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Thread: Alyeska auction for tow rig?

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    Member Grayling Slayer's Avatar
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    Default Alyeska auction for tow rig?

    I'm thinking about bidding on one of the many Duramax's at the upcoming Alyeska auction. There are some older 2004-2006 trucks with low mileage/hours. Is this a bad idea?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grayling Slayer View Post
    I'm thinking about bidding on one of the many Duramax's at the upcoming Alyeska auction. There are some older 2004-2006 trucks with low mileage/hours. Is this a bad idea?

    Are they 5500 or 4500 ????

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    They sold a bunch of slope fords at a richie bros auction in the valley last year. I thought the diesels went quite high. I think people get a little excited at these auctions.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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    Member Grayling Slayer's Avatar
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    Most of them are 2004-2006 2500HD crew cabs that I'm looking at. All together there are over 300 vehicles up for auction. I guess it would be a bit of a gamble but there might be some good deals.
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    Keep in mind even with very low miles most of those trucks run nearly 24/7 from what I have heard so there are lots of engine hours on them, However they are pretty well maintained.

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halibut Chaser View Post
    Keep in mind even with very low miles most of those trucks run nearly 24/7 from what I have heard so there are lots of engine hours on them, However they are pretty well maintained.
    If the battery is hooked up you hold the odometer button while the truck is off and you will find the hours. This works on GM products.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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    Most slope rigs don't idle as long as they used to as fuel is so expensive they don't like wasting it. Might be a sticker on the truck that says "idle exempt" or something similar, Avoid them as they are run continously.

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    Member Grayling Slayer's Avatar
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    There is a smaller auction tomorrow with about a dozen oil field Duramax's. I have two picked out with around 100,000 miles and under 10,000 hours. We'll see how much they go for.
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    Nice, I've got 162 an 02 it needs injectors to stop it from smoking at idle but it still pulls the 14k trailer great.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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    Member Grayling Slayer's Avatar
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    Well I got a great deal on a Duramax 2500hd at the Hicks Creek auction last weekend. I went thought it bumper to bumper and the only issue was a worn tie rod end which has already been replaced. Got it for $8500 with 115,000 miles. Blue book is around $23,000. I also had to order a replacement keyless entry remote as it was missing.
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    Quote Originally Posted by JR2 View Post
    Most slope rigs don't idle as long as they used to as fuel is so expensive they don't like wasting it. Might be a sticker on the truck that says "idle exempt" or something similar, Avoid them as they are run continously.

    Sent from my phone while I should be working.
    The Pipeline starts in Prudhoe bay and runs to Valdez.. its a very low likelihood these are North Slope Rigs and depending on what section of pipe these trucks have spent their working career its almost a certainty they are run continuously...mostly because the majority of these trucks are not subject to any north slope ban on idling.
    Ive been driving Alyeska rigs for 13 years.... before the new Eura systems I can tell you when it got past 30 below my work truck never got turned off. it was cheaper to pay the extra fuel then paying the manpower lost productivity and Possible safety issues of a truck frozen up. Most of the pipeline is remote and far from the resources of Prudhoe bay.

    The worst problem with these newer Diesel rigs is that the exhaust Filters and emissions are clogging due to excessive idling and improper cleaning procedures as well as frozen Urea systems....
    Its not uncommon to see ignorant guys running their trucks at 50 MPH in 3rd gear for extended periods trying to unclog these....(on these newer systems the higher RPMS don't help clean them its just abuse to the Vehicle) These trucks have computers that regulate the cleaning cycle Thus the additional RPM's mean nothing ...They have to come to temperature and be driven long enough at least at 45-55 MPH to run through this cleaning cycle.. Thats why the newer diesal engines and the haul road have a conflict of interest right from the start .... once it starts clogging in the cold your screwd
    Excessive idling around a job site at 10MPH and not driving down the highway enough...I gaurentee your screwd

    Ive even seen goons trying to add fuel or other additive to their urea tanks to stop them from freezing ...Once they do this and the on board computer detects it...it opens up a plethorea of other issues.

    This is just some of the abuse I've seen to these rigs......The mechanics work full time in the winter just trying to keep them on the road. Ignorant drivers don't help them out any.

    You could get lucky......but for the most part they are .....a work truck issued to any joe shmoe with a drivers license and alyeska badge. outside of work 90 percent of these guys never touch a diesal much less know anything about properly maintaining one.

    cross your fingers and bid knowing what your getting

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    Solution: buy something that predates EGR, DPF and Urea...

    I've driven to PS04 in a truck like what's being discussed. We turned it off and plugged it in at the bullrail. Temp that week: -30F.

    If I still lived up there and wanted a rig with an auto trans, I'd be taking a hard look at one.

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