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Thread: cabelas alaskan guide tent - pole type?

  1. #1

    Default cabelas alaskan guide tent - pole type?

    I am looking at getting a cabelas alaskan guide model 4 or 6 man tent for a moose float hunt and later a bou hunt and a spring bear hunt.

    Which poles are best - aluminum or finerglass? I always thought aluminum since it is lighter and stronger but after looking here some think the fiberglass is better since it can take continuous wind. I do not mind spending a few dollars more and weight is an issue.

    This tent will be used, at most, every other year for 1-2 weeks.

    Thanks
    DonV

  2. #2

    Thumbs up Alaskan Guide 4-man

    Only spent 7 days in the 4-man model, but was pleased with the performance. Fairly easy set-up and if you do a good job anchoring the rainfly wind will be a non-issue. Roomy enough for 2 men with cots and gear.

    The newer fiberglass poles have a higher strength-to-weight ratio than aluminum and you can carry a couple spare pole sections and shock cord without adding much weight.

  3. #3
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    I do not know which are better. Mine has fibreglass poles and it has worked well. Tie it down to brush with shock cords and it can hold up in a gale. J.

  4. #4

    Default

    How bad would it be to not be able to stand up in the tent (4 man version)? I am wondering if it is worth the weight savings vs. getting a 6 man (which you can stand in).

  5. #5
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    Default tent

    I have the 6 man model with the fiberglass poles and the full size vestibule. I was out at my moose camp a few years back and I am not sure how hard the wind blew that night but the weather reports siad close to 100mph in Delta so I bet we had 60-80 mph gusts that night. At one point it almost lifted me and my dad off the ground when the wind blew under the tent! I think the fiberglass would work just fine.

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    I have the 4 man version and love it. I also have the aluminum poles, but the savings in weight doesnt mean a lot when the tent weighs a lot anyway. Go with the poles you want, as both will hold up.

    Wind? My tent was set up about 60 feet from where an air ambulance came in (UH-60 helicopter) and landed to rescue an injured hunter last year out by Chicken. It didn't BUDGE! Awesome tents!

  7. #7
    Member cusackla's Avatar
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    Default aluminum poles in my book

    I spent 4 days in a storm in my tent out in Cold Bay and the fiber poles weathered the storm but they looked like feathers and the end of 4 days of slapping me in the face and bouncing back into position. The aluminum poles are lighter, but also designed for severe weather. I have found that to be true. Either choice you make you will be glad you purchased the guide model I know I am

  8. #8
    Member EricL's Avatar
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    I have used the 4 man with aluminum poles for 3 years now without any issues. Well Dad is coming with brother this year so I ordered the 6 man with aluminum poles. We do flyouts so I like the idea of weight savings. I like the fact of the 6' 3" center height of the 6 man!! EricL

  9. #9
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default ? tent poles

    I would recommend the aluminum poles. The fiberglass are prob'ly OK most of the time....but when they aren't, that's when you need to have the al. poles. There is a reason other than weight savings that mountaineers use al. poles and not fiberglass. In addition, a broken al. pole is generally easier to repair than a shattered fiberglass pole.

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    I think about making repairs when a pole gets broken. With aluminum it's easier to make field repairs with out taking extra poles and shock cording. My partner's Cabela's Guide tent has a cut off cartridge case slipped over one broken pole, that was put in place 8 years ago and he has never gotten around to replacing it. Works fine.

  11. #11
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    Several years back I had my Cabelas Alaskan guide 6-man tent destroyed. It had the fiberglass poles and they all broke and then ripped the hell out of my tent.

    We had very high winds on Hinchinbrook that fall, so maybe the aluminum would have done the same?

    I have went to the aluminum and haven't had any problems yet, but I also haven't been in high winds either.

  12. #12
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    Default My vote... and a trick!

    Aluminum.

    Leave three of the poles threaded through the top mesh guides, poles collapsed inward toward the mesh guide. Store the tent in this manner and it is a breeze to set up:

    Just flop it open, extend the three stored poles already threaded, clip the pole to the tent side, anchor the pole ends at the anchor points and it's in the air!

    Additionally, the clips will slide freely over the aluminum poles, but get hung up in the process of setting up the tent if it has fiberglass poles.

    Taylor

  13. #13
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Wow. Marc!

    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Taylor View Post
    Aluminum.

    Leave three of the poles threaded through the top mesh guides, poles collapsed inward toward the mesh guide. Store the tent in this manner and it is a breeze to set up:

    Just flop it open, extend the three stored poles already threaded, clip the pole to the tent side, anchor the pole ends at the anchor points and it's in the air!

    Additionally, the clips will slide freely over the aluminum poles, but get hung up in the process of setting up the tent if it has fiberglass poles.

    Taylor
    Marc,

    That's a scary look right there! I saw your photo on your post and turned into a pile of quivering jelly... I take back all the mean comments, real, perceived, accused or otherwise and resolve henceforth to keep to the straight and narrow, if you will just quit lookin' at me like that!

    I agree on the aluminum. Glass splinters too easily and you end up with a lacerated rainfly, as one poster pointed out. You won't find fiberglass poles on climbing tents, and it's not just because of the weight. Easton aluminum is the industry standard and it's hard to beat.

    Peace, friend!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
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    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
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  14. #14
    Member Queen of Kings's Avatar
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    Default Aluminum

    I too was in Cold Bay one Spring and the first night out the winds blew and blew, I had the 4 man bomb shelter and it tore it down and broke the aluminum poles. That AM we stood on the bluff and I swear we could lean over 45 degrees into the wind and not fall over. Must have been 80 plus. Some days nothing will hold up. Luckly we had a cabin to get shelter. It was small so that is why I stayed in the tent, short lived though
    2003 220 Hewescraft Sea Runner 115 Yam'y, Soft Top "Schmidt Happens"

  15. #15

    Default

    Don,
    I have the 6 man tent and I'm glad I picked up that one rather than the 4 man. But to be quite honest, I don't pack it around on my back going up the mountian so weight wasn't a big issue with me. I do spend about a week at a time in it every year and it has held up great. After a few days the extra room and ceiling height was nice.

  16. #16
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Default Save those...

    ...broken aluminum poles.

    Oh the joy of wind strong enough to snap the poles. I kept a bunch of the sections and not only do I have a means to repair the next one, but they make great tent stakes.
    If you've ever camped in the cinder or on the sand it is impossible to hold a normal stake. Those long sections sunk deep into the sand hold well and are always handy.
    Live life and love it
    Love life and live it

  17. #17

    Default have that tent

    have had two of those tents used in unit 13 heavy winds two weeks a year moose camp and have broken the poles fiberglass on both of them if the break they just split and it is no fun

  18. #18

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    Good info guys, thanks, great idea leaving poles in for fast setup and great idea using a cartridge casing for a repair - really great idea, now if I can just remember it!

    I can get a good deal on a 4 man aluminum pole, I will buy it, weight is an issue since many times it will be flying with me and I can only take 100 lbs, every pound I save is another pound of something else I can take.

    Thanks

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    Default 6 man Alaskan

    I have used the 6 man Cabella's tent here in Arizona for about five years. I purchased the aluminum poles because of my experience with fiberglass poles (broken, unrepairable). I have not been in any really nasty storms, but several rain, hail and snow storms. NO FLAPPING = GOOD NIGHTS SLEEP. Go with the aluminium, especially since weight is an issue for you.

    Generally I just set my cot up under an lowered EzUp, but when the rain is horizontal, I set up the Alaskan Guide tent.

  20. #20
    Member cusackla's Avatar
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    Default Proper Set-up

    I think the key to having a tent still standing after a Big Storm all boils down to proper tent placement and setup. I always try to find something to setup near or around that will help break the wind. I have even went as far as to stack drift wood in front of the tent to help provide a little wind break. I also always try to use all of the tie-down points and each one on a seperate stake if possible. I had my tent slap me in the face for four days in Cold Bay, the wind blew so hard that it bent the metal rings that hold the pole pins (Thank God For Duct Tape) but at the end of four days, she popped back up a little battle scared, but we were high and dry for the remainder of the 10 day trip

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