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Thread: Halibut setup

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    Default Halibut setup

    Looking for opinions on favorite halibut bait setup (from boat at anchor). I have seen sinker on slider above hook setup and ones with sinker on fixed swivel below the hook setup. I noticed B&J's selling wire spreaders but I have never tried.

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    I run my weights above my hooks on a corkscrew swivel.
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    ImageUploadedByTapatalk1369628863.018397.jpg Kodak jig is all you need...
    Do I give my friends advice? Jesus, no. They wouldn't take advice from me. Nobody should take advice from me. I haven't got a clue about anything..

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    I agree about the Kodiak Jig, I jig most of the time but my friends and family like to bait fish and I like them to chum the hole for me!,!

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    No more input?

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    Member NeverLand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NORTH2AK View Post
    No more input?
    I hook a leader (500lb test) to the same corkscrew swivel that I put the weight on. I use a 16/0 circle hook with as much herring as I can put on the hook. Put the leader on first, THEN the sinker. I run 400yds of 100lb Tuf line off of a Penn International 16 VSX attached to a 6' standup rod with roller guides. I rarely anchor. Usually I drift over my spots. I adjust the drift based on the action.

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    Member MRFISH's Avatar
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    Default lazy man's fishing

    I fish the weight (usually a 12 or 16 oz cod loaf attached on the same corkscrew swivel from the main line that also connects a 12 or 16 inch mono leader to a circle hook). But, I think this is an interesting question. I know some folks work hard for their fish, they drift or jig hard (and I'm sure they catch more fish than I), but a big part of my fishing experience is relaxation, so sometimes that involves soaking bait while at anchor, and the rod in the rod holder. I've found most of my fish come while the weight (and bait) sits on the bottom --assuming i'm not likely to snag up as the weight&bait moves around as the boat swings on the anchor. But I'm curious if folks think having the bait up a few feet from the bottom is a better way to go (assuming the rod is in the holder and otherwise unattended).
    "Fishing relaxes me. It's like yoga, except I still get to kill something." --Ron Swanson

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    Member Rob B's Avatar
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    I like having my bait above the weight. That way it's up off the bottom.
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    Member AKluvr95's Avatar
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    I look forward to bringing my new crimping pliers and terminal gear by Friday. You can school me on those with the weight on the bottom and bait up higher. Are those the triangle ones you showed me?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob B View Post
    I like having my bait above the weight. That way it's up off the bottom.

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    Run everything. Start off running jigs like Gibbs Cod, diamond jigs, leadhead/grub, Kodiak Custom, etc. More fun to connect with the fish with the rod in your hand. Once I get bored or tired, I'll anchor and throw a circle hook with bait and throw it in the rod holder and kick back with a beer. All methods catch halibut, they're not picky creatures.

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    I make all my terminal gear and use items such as bobbers, scented line, inline scent canisters, and even flashing lights. Jigging for me produces the bigger fish too. Nothing excites me more than a new found jig creation.

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    Member captaindd's Avatar
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    The info is from my log book on the the 27th of May I was using bait and jigs while anchored. 27 May low tide 9:46 Am -3.3ft High Tide 4.20PM 9.8 ft drop anchor 9:45 am in 152 ft water Had on board 6 people 3 guys and 3 gals fishing. Put out 1 jig pole on Stern port side and another jig pole Stern starboard side. Other 4 poles where set up with herring and squid. Jig poles had herring and one had Berkley Rootbeer 8" power bait. 9:50 1 quill back Berkley Power Bait,10:00 Yellow eye Port Jig Pole, 10:05 1 Quill Back Bait Pole 1020 35lb Halibut Berkley Power Bait 1045 70 Pound Halibut Bait Pole, 11:05 90 LB Halibut Jig Pole, 11:35 35lb Halibut Bait Pole, 11:50 90lb Halibut Berkley Power Bait, 12:15 40lb Halibut Bait, 1300 35Lb Halibut Bait 1330 40Lb Bait 1400 90LB Halibut Jig Pole 1405 60 LB Halibut Bait 1445 70 lb Halibut jig and 1450 50lb halibut bait. The other jig was a 16 oz pink and white Walley Whale from Walmart.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    When I fish bait, which is rarely, I run a slider sinker setup made up of gangion line. I start with approximately a 6' length of line and tie on the hook. Then a form a loop with the tag end about 18" long and slideon a 4/0 barrel swivel and either a 4/0 corkscrew swivel or 16 oz teardrop sinker. Then the loop is tied off. The main line attaches to the barrel swivel and the corksrew swivel or sinker is free to slide on one leg of the loop.

    Nine times out of ten jigs will outfish bait, and ten times out of ten a jigging rod is more fun to use than a bait rod. The only times I use bait is for people who aren't comfortable jigging or if we're on the hook for a food break or taking a nap and not really actively fishing.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    While I do prefer jigs we do use bait a lot.
    My bait setup is a corkscrew swivel on my line then to that I add a spreader bar. I attach my weight to the short arm of the spreader bar and my leader to the longer arm.
    For leaders I tie my own using gaignon twine and a gaignon knot on each end. On one end I attach a large swivel and the other gets a hook either a circle or J hook. Sometimes I will use a setup with a bead on each side of a Jumbo Spin-n-glo and that has worked awsome for me.
    I used to buy the store bought crimped mono setups but after loosing a few fish including some smaller ones to crimps pulling out I now stick strictly to the gaignon twine. Halibut aren't line shy and I never have to buy crimps or mono and don't own a crimp tool. I have never had a gaignon knot come out or the twine get fraid. I use either 200# or 300# Tuna chord I bought at the gear shed in Homer.
    When the tide slacks and I can work my jigs again it is as simple as taking off the spreader bar and putting on one of my homeade jigs. It takes mere seconds to switch back and forth this way.
    I will never use those crimped mono rigs again EVER. Longliners don't use them either and they ought to know a thing or two about catching Halibut.
    I bought my spreader bars from John Beath at Halibut.net. They work good for me.
    Sometimes in Cook Inlet the tide is moving too much for jigs and heavy weights are neccessary. You can't always pick good tide days with work and the weather against us.
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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskanhidalgo View Post
    I make all my terminal gear and use items such as bobbers, scented line, inline scent canisters, and even flashing lights. Jigging for me produces the bigger fish too. Nothing excites me more than a new found jig creation.
    I wonder what is different about how we fish, or the location, how big is "bigger", or ???

    When it comes to big fish, bait has been the hands down winner for us; 90% of the fish that we have caught over 100# were caught on bait.

    I still prefer jigging, in part because we always catch twice as many fish using jigs as we and others around us catch with bait, and sometimes three or four times as many.

    Big_E

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    Dang I might have to try jigging more. I've been experimenting with rigging for bait.
    Right now I'm using a weight at the end of the leader with a dropper loop tied about 8 inches or so above it. Then I attach a short leader and hook to the dropper loop. My only problem with it is that the bait can get wrapped around the leader in the way down. I minor that by using big bait and slowly letting the bait fall.

    Definitely getting more violent bites with this setup

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    Member AKCAPT's Avatar
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    Funny I would say 80% of the really big fish I have caught, over 200 have come on jigs. With that said, i rarely drift, always have bait and scent in the water and usually jig two rods at a time. I also have two deckhands and an anchor winch, which make anchoring and chumming much easier for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by vaaler View Post
    I wonder what is different about how we fish, or the location, how big is "bigger", or ???

    When it comes to big fish, bait has been the hands down winner for us; 90% of the fish that we have caught over 100# were caught on bait.

    I still prefer jigging, in part because we always catch twice as many fish using jigs as we and others around us catch with bait, and sometimes three or four times as many.

    Big_E

  18. #18

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    My ol' standby for years for big halibut was a Berkley power grub (tail cut off to keep the little un's from pulling it down the shank of the jig) and a strip of salmon belly. Put lots of 100lb+ hali in the boat with that set-up and a handful over 200.

    I haven't been putting jigs down when at anchor, which I do almost daily.. sounds like I need to. My partner boat and I have observed over the years when "weirdness" starts happening to our bait.. (hard to explain) and if we drop a jig down, a big one usually pounces right on. I'm not sure what those big ones (talking 200lb+) do when they come up on a baited circle hook.. but often it weird rod shakes, soft mushy feeling bites, etc.. I often wondered if they lay on the bait or if they are chasing off the smaller halibut brushing the lines as we get a lull in the action too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKCAPT View Post
    Funny I would say 80% of the really big fish I have caught, over 200 have come on jigs. With that said, i rarely drift, always have bait and scent in the water and usually jig two rods at a time. I also have two deckhands and an anchor winch, which make anchoring and chumming much easier for me.
    The pieces of the puzzle may be coming together here! I am almost always drifting when I am jigging, but my biggest jig fish was caught at anchor. I also never use bait on my jigs because it attracts lots of rockfish, sculpins, etc. in the places where I usually jig. This year I will try spending more time jigging at anchor, and sweeten my jigs.

    The charter captains I have fished with in Icy Strait often have three guys fishing bait and one jigging.

    Big_E

  20. #20
    Member Boreal's Avatar
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    +1 on the Kodiak jigs. Fished different weights a colors last weekend vs other jigs and bait. Kodiak jigs outfished the others 3:1 on all three days.

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