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Thread: The New Way of Doing Medicals - FAA MedXpress

  1. #1
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    Default The New Way of Doing Medicals - FAA MedXpress

    Well I did my medical today, took me an good hour to do the thing on line then another good hour and a half with my AME of 25 years. He dose not like the new system one bit. Can't say that I blame him. But there is an up side to all of this, for the first time ever in my flying career such as it is, I have no vision restrictions on my medical!! I have some other issues but my Eye Balls are in good shape. As for the rest of me, rode hard put away wet. Have a great Memorial Day weekend guys!

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by BH206L3 View Post
    Well I did my medical today, took me an good hour to do the thing on line then another good hour and a half with my AME of 25 years. He dose not like the new system one bit. Can't say that I blame him. But there is an up side to all of this, for the first time ever in my flying career such as it is, I have no vision restrictions on my medical!! I have some other issues but my Eye Balls are in good shape. As for the rest of me, rode hard put away wet. Have a great Memorial Day weekend guys!
    So is this just to minimize the paperwork that has to be done in the office? Or is the FAA slacking back on some of the actual medical standards?

    Not sure how this is going to help pilots.

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    Member Sierra Hotel's Avatar
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    Maybe it's my natural paranoia, but methinks this is another way for the FAA to gather data and maintain it, with the potential for that data being used against some pilot who doesn't answer questions consistently over the years.




    Or it could be I'm just being cynical . . . .

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sierra Hotel View Post
    Maybe it's my natural paranoia, but methinks this is another way for the FAA to gather data and maintain it, with the potential for that data being used against some pilot who doesn't answer questions consistently over the years.




    Or it could be I'm just being cynical . . . .
    I wonder how many are flying with expired medicals anyways, once you fail a medical your up the creek but if its simply expired there is more leeway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rppearso View Post
    I wonder how many are flying with expired medicals anyways, once you fail a medical your up the creek but if its simply expired there is more leeway.
    You are a fount of misinformation. Where in the world do you get it all ???

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzly 2 View Post
    You are a fount of misinformation. Where in the world do you get it all ???
    I talked to a guy who was trying to get his light sport licence and he could not because he failed a medical, had it simply expired he could have still flew light sport, now he has to go through the FAA medical dog and pony show to get his medical back if he even can. This leads to a lot of die hard pilots simply flying without medicals.

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    New way for medicals? The MedXpress thing is nothing more than an electronic 8500-8 form. The identical form you've filled out in carbon triplicate for years. It's about time.

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    Google the changes to the Aeromedical rules or look it up on AOPA's website. Cardiac issues have more relaxed SI requirements. Several former SI conditions are now classified to allow your AME to issue an unrestricted medical in his office. Several more are supposed to be added in the coming year. The FAA has done pilots a significant service with the recent changes.

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    I have nothing but good to say about the services I have received from the FAA over the past several years.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    I have nothing but good to say about the services I have received from the FAA over the past several years.
    Given that I've had the FAA folks in my headphones for the past 58-years, you won't hear me complaining about them, either. It's been quite a service , no question about it. My tax dollars well spent.

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    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    I lost my registration into a lake a couple years back , just before a client need a check ride.
    I called a nice lady in OK city and within 1 hour I had a permission letter faxed to my wife's office.

    A few days later the new registration arrived in the mail.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
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  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Google the changes to the Aeromedical rules or look it up on AOPA's website. Cardiac issues have more relaxed SI requirements. Several former SI conditions are now classified to allow your AME to issue an unrestricted medical in his office. Several more are supposed to be added in the coming year. The FAA has done pilots a significant service with the recent changes.
    That is great to know, I thought the 155 bp requirement was kind of restrictive.

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    Member Sierra Hotel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rppearso View Post
    That is great to know, I thought the 155 bp requirement was kind of restrictive.
    There are still limitations in place -

    the FAA disqualifies pilots with a systolic (higher number) blood pressure at or above 155 or a diastolic (lower number) pressure at or above 95.
    Blood Pressure Optimal Normal High Normal Hypertension FAA Limit
    Systolic (top #) <120 <130 130-139 140 or higher 155 or higher
    Diastolic < 80 < 85 85-90 90 or higher 95 or higher

    . . . and if your BP is in the hypertension range or above, please see a doc - there are longer term issues that can be dealt with with fairly easily by your doc that will not preclude you getting or keeping a medical - if you treat now. Wait, and you're facing kidney issues, eyesight issues, or even death. If one does have hypertension, treatment can be combinations of up to 3 of the following: Alpha blockers, Betablockers, ACE inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin II receptor antagonists, and/or diuretics. NOT acceptable: Centrally acting antihypertensives

    (Although 155/95 is acceptable for certification, the airman should be referred to their primary provider for further management, if the blood pressure is above clinical practice standards).

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