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Thread: What do you garden?

  1. #1
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    Default What do you garden?

    When I was living in Anchorage, I grew a veggie garden, consisting of corn, Peas, Potatoes, lettuce, onions, tomatos, carrots, cucumbers, & Peppers, all with in a small 20' x 4' plot...within different years, the exception of peppers & tomatoes being grown in pots & brought in during the cool nights...I was amazed that my corn stalks grew over 6', but didn't look like much of a going concern but produced rather robust ears, as my neighbors (who were sourdough if you can call los anchoragites that) said my tomatos, peppers, cukes & corn wouldn't grow, but they did...

    I wish I could've expanded my garden but someday when I get my own land I will start again...

    What all do you garden here in AK?

    Ps. them potatoes were some of the largest spuds I ever did see in my enitre life!!!

  2. #2
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    I grew up in Anchorage, my family has been here since 1914. My great Grandparents had enormous gardens up and down what is now E st. and a hog farm down to what is now third ave. They grew very good corn, tomato's, spuds and every kind of cold climate cruciferous veggie you can think of. I grow enormous spuds, cabbage, carrots, beets, radishes, currants, raspberries, rhubarb, strawberries, broccoli, cauliflower, and horseradish. Whew! it can be a lot of work but those fresh veggies sure to pickle up nice and taste so good.

  3. #3
    Mark
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    We like fresh brussel sprouts, kalarabi, turnips, and peas.

    Our garden plot (about 25' x 60') has a "scab" in the soil that will attack potatoes, so we don't grow them anymore.

    We've toyed around with tomatoes with some success, but our hothouse blew down a few years ago, and I haven't built the wife another one.........

    Yeah, it's on "the list"............

  4. #4
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    I live up north, just below the Arctic Circle, and the frost free growing season is about 1 month shorter than down toward Anchorage, so there are a few things that just donít grow up hereÖlike corn. They need the extra days. But we can get quite hot in the summer time so greenhouse plants like tomatoes, peppers, squash and cucumbers do very well. I also grow some herbs such as oregano, sage, lemon basil, dill, mint and thyme in pots either in the greenhouse or in the bay window. Mr. Kitty loves to browse his very own catnip plant that I have inside on the window sill too.

    In the garden I have good luck with cabbage, broccoli, turnips, carrots, cauliflower, kale, Swiss chard and of course various leaf lettuce, romaine lettuce and radishes. Sugar snap peas grow very well along the back fence and are excellent pickled for winter use as well as the usual stir-fry or fresh in a salad. I also have a chive patch and a rhubarb patch that comes back from their roots year after year. Got to love those plants that you donít have to start indoors in the late spring and then transplant into the garden. They just grow!

    I havenít had a whole lot of luck with potatoes because even in July we can get a frost when the weather comes from the north. Potatoes canít handle temperatures near freezing even if I cover them at night. I have a small Swedish peanut potato I am going to try this year. Hopefully this variety will be a little tougher and can handle a cold night now and then.

    Canít wait to get thing outside and into the ground, but last year I jumped the gun and planted a week too early. We had 3 nights of 20 degrees the first week of June and I lost more than half of my plants. I learned my lesson and wonít rush it this year.
    Good luck to all those green thumbs out there!

    Happy gardening,
    Grandma Lori
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

  5. #5
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    Currently in our hydroponics...tomatoes, cucumbers, celery, basil, and parsley. My wife is quite the hydroponic gardener so we have abundant tomatoes, peppers, and cucumbers year-round.

    In dirt....beets, zucchini, assorted squash, beans, peas, carrots, spinach, cabbage, kale, swiss chard, broccoli, cauliflower, celery, and a few potatoes. Last year we had luck with artichokes. We've had no luck with corn. Herbs include basil, oregano, parsley, and rosemary. The gardens are surrounded by nasturtiums to keep the bugs away, and for use to brighten up salads.

    The best taste improvement for our home-grown veggies compared to store bought? Celery, without a doubt. The difference is amazing.

  6. #6
    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Currently in our hydroponics...tomatoes, cucumbers, celery, basil, and parsley. My wife is quite the hydroponic gardener so we have abundant tomatoes, peppers, and cucumbers year-round.
    Gosh, I have always wanted to learn more about hydroponics...could you tell us more about it? Got any pictures?
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

  7. #7
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    Lori,

    I don't have any pictures handy but I'd be happy to snap some. We have quite an impressive tomato crop on the vine currently, and at least a dozen ripe tomatoes sitting on the counter!

    Our current system is technically an aeroponic system. We used the typical flood-and-drain hydoponic systems for years. In those you use a rock wool cube that contains all the root growth and holds moisture in between flood cycles. With aeroponics the seed is started in a very small cube and the roots grow in the open air inside the aeroponic chambers, which in our case are about 4'"x4" square PVC tubes. Nutrient is constantly misted on the roots 24/7 by perforated 1/4" semi-rigid tubing that runs through the bigger tubes. This system has been more productive, resistant to disease, immune to over feeding and under feeding, and requires less water than our old hydro setups. Our system consists of three tubes that are probably 8' long that are set aside each other on sawhorses. The tubes are fed by a 30gallon reservoir with a submerged pump and the tubes drain directly into the reservoir. The system is very efficient for a small space. Tomatoes and cucumbers that start in a 1"x1" cube will easily grow to 10' tall with some tying off for support. We use two 400 watt grow lights that operate on an automatic timer. Between the two lights and the aeroponic system we have more fresh tomatoes and cucumbers than we can eat. The trick to this kind of gardening is learning to time new plant starts to maintain consistent fruit production.

  8. #8
    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    Pid, thanks for that info, I am going to do some research and give it a try someday. Is it pretty spendy to get started on a modest setup? Winter would be tough since I am out of the grid (the lights would probably be the killer), but in summer I have extra power from the solar panels. Only seen the old fashioned version and that was years and years ago. Would love to see some pictures when you have time to snap a few.

    Thanks again,
    Lori
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

  9. #9
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    Lori,

    Here's a site you'll find interesting.

    http://www.generalhydroponics.com/ge.../products.html

    My wife's system is the Aeroflo 30. For your part of the world check out the EcoGrower unit. It sounds like they're coming out with a solar powered version. That'd be pretty cool for off-grid gardening. The growth rate is pretty incredible with these systems. That may serve you well with your long days / short season.

    Here's an e-bay link for an ecogrower.
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ECOGROWER-DRIP-H...QQcmdZViewItem
    Last edited by Mr. Pid; 05-15-2007 at 16:58. Reason: added link.

  10. #10
    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    Mr. Pid, thanks for the links. I enjoyed checking it all out and was pleased to see that the prices are not as bad as I expected for a small starter system. I suppose with all the extra's that one would need the dollars would go up. But hey, it looks like it might be do-able someday. Sure would be fun to give it a try!

    Thanks again,
    Grandma Lori
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

  11. #11
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    Currently I live in town, in a rental so not much space for gardening. I did use a flower bed for 6 tomato plants last year though. Normally I have green beans, tomatoes, onions, a variety of leaf (lettuce, spinach, mustard) carrots, squash, and peas. I normally have some of this and that in addition but those are my staples.
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    Don't leave anything in a greenhouse that looks good to moose in there over the winter They WILL access it and eat it and not be concerned about what kind of a mess they leave behind. I learned that one the hard way

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