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Thread: Cold, cold water....

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    Member AKCAPT's Avatar
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    Default Cold, cold water....

    I am not sure what it all means but I was reading surface water temperatures from Cape Ailiak to Nuka Bay at or below 39 degrees. I don't ever recall see temperatures that low in the spring. I know the water needs to be about 10 degrees warmer for the Kings to really start biting.....We better get a bunch of warm, sunny days soon or salmon are likely to be very late this year.
    If you coming to Seward this weekend, you better dress warm!!!

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    Andy - I saw the same temps out around the Cape a week or so ago and thought the same thing. Last week I noted the temps up to 42F but still a lot colder than normal. Now it's snowing in Anchorage! Where's our good spring weather?

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKCAPT View Post
    We better get a bunch of warm, sunny days soon or salmon are likely to be very late this year.
    Haven't the majority of the runs all over the state been later and later the last few years?
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKCAPT View Post
    ...at or below 39 degrees....
    That makes me wonder about upwelling, or if your sensor is shallow, freshwater runoff. Our temps are actually a little higher than I logged last year.

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    You know why it's so freaking cold, right?:

    Global warming. Yup, that's right:

    http://www.wunderground.com/news/sea-ice-loss-20130326

    Ideologies die hard..............

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    Member cod's Avatar
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    I like this part....... "The hypothesis that wind patterns are being changed because melting Arctic sea ice has exposed huge swaths of normally frozen ocean to the atmosphere would explain both the extremes of heat and cold, say the scientists."
    I guess that pretty well covers it!
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

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    Member AKCAPT's Avatar
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    My temp sensor is 6 feet below the surface. I just return from the "Managing the Nations Fisheries" conference in Washington DC and the big topics were Climate Change and Ocean Acidification, there is no doubt that the climate if changing right before our eyes. The northeast has seen the highest waters temps ever recorded for the last 5 years.
    It seems like our water and weather has been getting colder and yes the salmon have been later every year in Seward.
    Glad I have three heaters in my boat.

    Good luck out there

    AM

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    I'm talking about 39F out in Blying Sound no where near surface runoff. At first I thought my Furuno was showing me something else, being my first trip out for the year so I checked the manual and sure enough it was water temp. To make sure it wasn't off, I plugged in my old Garmin and it had a consistent, low, reading with the Furuno. About 10 years ago I noted PWS water temps up to 60F, quite a bit above the 55F I was used to in teh summer. It returned to 55F last I was boating in the sound several years ago so there are normal cycles but this is really low. Hope that warm water back east makes it around to us! I've got a feeling this could be a really cold summer if the water doesn't warm up.

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    Any thoughts on how this might affect salmon runs? Does anybody have any historical knowledge about water temps and salmon migrations?

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    We had 39-41 in PWS when we were out shrimping recently. I was telling the guys on the boat it's going to be a while for the halibut to make it closer in on the sound this year. We were around mid to upper 40's the middle of June last season when I noticed a significant increase in the bite closer in near Crafton Is. Looks like we just might have to run farther out when we take our Airmen from Eielson for this season's Airman Appreciation trip. We are hitting the water with them June 20-22.

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    Member Mel Roe's Avatar
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    Only 38.9 on the water in Kodiak today. When I seen these temps last week I thought my sensor might be off too but it is working correctly.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brain View Post
    Any thoughts on how this might affect salmon runs? Does anybody have any historical knowledge about water temps and salmon migrations?
    Salmon require a very narrow temperature range of water to spawn in, that's why so much habitat can be ruined so quickly by dams, backed up water warms up too much. Likewise water which is too cold is said to delay spawning however I don't think too cold is as critical as too warm. Back in Washington we were always dealing with too warm. I'm no biologist but that's my college biology understanding...

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    Member Jack in Alaska's Avatar
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    I saw 42.5F water temp Sun. trolling south of Deep Creek. Also........one king in the boat. My wife caught it.

    We saw 3 others caught during the tide. One boat had a double. It isn't fair sometimes.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by limon32 View Post
    Salmon require a very narrow temperature range of water to spawn in, that's why so much habitat can be ruined so quickly by dams, backed up water warms up too much. Likewise water which is too cold is said to delay spawning however I don't think too cold is as critical as too warm.......
    Thanks for that, and I've read that such temperature studies in the fresh water rivers have been looked at. What I was wondering was about the ocean temps before the salmon enter the rivers. Specifically, I'm wondering if the ocean hasn't warmed up, perhaps the salmon will stay out there and not be triggered to run to the rivers at all?

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    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
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    I've been fishing from Ugak Bay to Chiniak Bay everyday for the last 2 weeks, been 42-44 on the surface.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brain View Post
    Thanks for that, and I've read that such temperature studies in the fresh water rivers have been looked at. What I was wondering was about the ocean temps before the salmon enter the rivers. Specifically, I'm wondering if the ocean hasn't warmed up, perhaps the salmon will stay out there and not be triggered to run to the rivers at all?
    My thought would be it would have to do more with the condition of the rivers releasing their unique "scent" into the ocean than ocean temps. I.e. a late breakup with a river or low rainfall early in the season may be of a bigger concern than the ocean temps. Then again I could be completely off base. It may be more related to whatever drives the bait fish (herring, euchelon) closer to the rivers.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    My thought would be it would have to do more with the condition of the rivers releasing their unique "scent" into the ocean than ocean temps. I.e. a late breakup with a river or low rainfall early in the season may be of a bigger concern than the ocean temps. Then again I could be completely off base. It may be more related to whatever drives the bait fish (herring, euchelon) closer to the rivers.
    I could have heard wrong, but for years I've also heard that fish will wait offshore for the water to get to the right temp before entering. That also makes me wonder if it has anything also to do with why fish have been arriving later and later the last few years.......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    ......That also makes me wonder if it has anything also to do with why fish have been arriving later and later the last few years.......
    My thoughts exactly........

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    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
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    Friday afternoon I had 48 in Chiniak, cooled down that night, was 46 all the Way to Ugak Island on Saturday.

  20. #20

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    That matches mine. Lots warmer than last year, but close to the year before. By my log, it was 41 degrees this day last year. Brrrr. And the fish were really late for us.

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