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Thread: What's the real reason

  1. #1

    Default What's the real reason

    I'm new to the state but the more I read some of the regulations the more I began to wonder why. For instance what is the purpose of limiting four wheelers or access to certain areas. The only thing it does is close the hunting to people who can't afford a plane ride out. Especially don't understand it on a management sense if that particular area is already a permit hunt. Maybe I'm missing the reason hear but it seems some if the regulations are almost made to produce commerce and not managment what's your thoughts.

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    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dakota boy View Post
    I'm new to the state but the more I read some of the regulations the more I began to wonder why. For instance what is the purpose of limiting four wheelers or access to certain areas. The only thing it does is close the hunting to people who can't afford a plane ride out. Especially don't understand it on a management sense if that particular area is already a permit hunt. Maybe I'm missing the reason hear but it seems some if the regulations are almost made to produce commerce and not managment what's your thoughts.

    Use the quads god gave you, comes to mind.


    Limiting access is a way of limiting crowds, wheelers in certain areas do a centuries worth of damage in a weekend to the tundra.

    Lots of folks still access areas on *gasp* foot, and if they cannot, there are other alternatives, and yes that includes ponying up for a plane ride. As the saying goes, if ya wanna play, you gots to pay.......
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dakota boy View Post
    I'm new to the state but the more I read some of the regulations the more I began to wonder why. For instance what is the purpose of limiting four wheelers or access to certain areas. The only thing it does is close the hunting to people who can't afford a plane ride out. Especially don't understand it on a management sense if that particular area is already a permit hunt. Maybe I'm missing the reason hear but it seems some if the regulations are almost made to produce commerce and not managment what's your thoughts.

    Some of us (Me 67 y/o) enjoy "WALKING/Hiking" in wilderness that does NOT look like a plowed field. Maybe park your dirt thrasher and hike in 40 miles. You asked for my opinion.........If it was up to me ATV's would be illegal everywhere in Alaska..........but in the town limits of bush villages.

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    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    Tried to rep you AGL, system say I have to spread some around. Great post.
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

  5. #5

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    I reffered to atv as an example I do understand they can be damaging but generally areas that limit atvs limit all motorized vehicles which include boats leaving you with generally no option but to fly out. Hiking a distance is generally not an option when hunting large animals such as moose. If damage is the reason I agree it is a **** good one to regulate its use but a boat as far as my experience goes does not cause a substantial mark to the area in which it enters. And we the regulations only limit the use of these for hunting recreational use Is still being conducted damage is still happening and the atv trails are already present in most of these areas.

  6. #6

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    For instance most states limit atv use to established trails or the same reason as mentioned to prevent damage but there is no regulation in Alaska like this as I know off. The regulations prohibit only use of these during hunting nothing keeps me from joy riding, not that I want too just saying what I've read in the regs

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    The number of acres of land set aside in a controlled use area is extremely small compared to the millions of acres where you can do what ever you want how ever you want. It makes whining about it rather pointless.

    In the Tangle Lakes Archeology area you can not ride off trails.

    The one issue with allowing people to ride on a trail, but not off a trail is that there is not enough inforcement. People are seriously lazy once a moose is down in a swamp and people will drive off the trail to go get it rather than pack it out. All too common and issue with humans. They are not trustworthy.

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    Member SkinnyD's Avatar
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    Are boats considered motorized vehicles? apparently planes are not.
    Passing up shots on mergansers since 1992.


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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Potential reasons for a CUA:

    -Quality of experience
    -Reduce crowding
    -Prevent habitat damage
    -Provide refugia for game populations
    -Reduce harvest
    -Protect archeological sites
    -Federal laws on fed-owned land

    There are others, but that's the basic gist of why some areas are restricted to ATV use.

    I own an ATV and use it sometimes, but I'm a big fan of CUAs in some cases.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkinnyD View Post
    Are boats considered motorized vehicles? apparently planes are not.
    That brings up a good question - are there any CUAs where boats are restricted? I know of a number where they are allowed while ATVs are not.

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    You can usually use horses also....

  12. #12

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    Dakota Boy................You will very soon learn something VERY horrible. That in truth there is NOT massive quantities of game animals in Alaska. Also a massive amount of Alaska is owned by Native Corporations, National Park Service, and The National Forest Service. My best advise is hunt as much as you can in the near future, because it is only going to get more and more like California. The Human population has nearly tripled in the last 50 years.

    In my opinion Fly-in hunts concentrate hunters on lakes and bush strips and for the most part it is NOT a quality hunt, this is especially true for moose and caribou. A fly-in sheep hunt is a good value. Just my opinion. There is good ATV hunting, but like all hunting in Alaska you really want to be at your camp two days before the season opens.

    You have never experienced hell till your ATV craps-out or drowns 14 miles in on a day hunt with no survival gear..

    And there is NO cheap hunting in Alaska.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    That brings up a good question - are there any CUAs where boats are restricted? I know of a number where they are allowed while ATVs are not.
    Ya the specific permit hunt in 20a I was looking at did. Stated closed to everything but a plane pretty much

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dakota boy View Post
    Ya the specific permit hunt in 20a I was looking at did. Stated closed to everything but a plane pretty much

    I have NEVER heard of a hunt in Alaska that was restricted to aircraft access ONLY.

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    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dakota boy View Post
    Ya the specific permit hunt in 20a I was looking at did. Stated closed to everything but a plane pretty much
    I assume then you're looking at the Yanert CUA or Wood River CUA. Yes... access by plane or horse or foot only. I know people who have killed moose in those areas. They all came out via supercub. $$$ My advice is to look into a different moose hunt if you don't want to pay.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    And there is NO cheap hunting in Alaska.
    So I take it you've never walked out your back door and shot a moose?
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    In my opinion Fly-in hunts concentrate hunters on lakes and bush strips and for the most part it is NOT a quality hunt, this is especially true for moose and caribou.
    If you know somebody with a cub and is good with it, you don't need a full fledged lake, or strip, to land in some VERY high quality hunting areas......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  18. #18
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    And there is NO cheap hunting in Alaska.
    Wrong. My wife's black bear cost us about $50 in fuel. My first moose cost me about $20 in fuel. I've taken two caribou on day hunts that cost about $40 in fuel. I could go on, but you get the point. Laying down some coin may provide for a more remote experience with better game populations, but there are plenty of less expensive options for those who seek them and are willing to put in some sweat. Yes, of course there were some other costs involved with the above hunts such as packs, knives, and boots, but those are things that I own anyways because this is a part of my lifestyle. Understanding that, you can certainly hunt for costs that are far less than many would have you believe.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wyo2AK View Post
    I assume then you're looking at the Yanert CUA or Wood River CUA. Yes... access by plane or horse or foot only. I know people who have killed moose in those areas. They all came out via supercub. $$$ My advice is to look into a different moose hunt if you don't want to pay.
    Ya I believe that is what I was looking at.

  20. #20
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Wrong. My wife's black bear cost us about $50 in fuel. My first moose cost me about $20 in fuel. I've taken two caribou on day hunts that cost about $40 in fuel. I could go on, but you get the point. Laying down some coin may provide for a more remote experience with better game populations, but there are plenty of less expensive options for those who seek them and are willing to put in some sweat. Yes, of course there were some other costs involved with the above hunts such as packs, knives, and boots, but those are things that I own anyways because this is a part of my lifestyle. Understanding that, you can certainly hunt for costs that are far less than many would have you believe.
    I hear you.... most of my hunts are less than $50 in gas (even at today's prices!).

    Fishing on the other hand....well, let's not go there.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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