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Thread: Brown bear by bow

  1. #1

    Default Brown bear by bow

    For the bow hunters out there who have taken a brown bear with a bow...

    I'm looking at a brown bear hunt this spring. I will be shooting from a tree stand and so I know the distance of the shot will be at 20 yrds from 16' up in a tree. I'm hoping to see a particular bear I've seen for the past couple of years and he is at least 9' if not pushing 10'.

    Now for the question. What is the average distance a brown will go after the shot (assuming a double lung hit)? The reason I ask is the the area I will be hunting is thick with alder brush and other ground cover. I will probably lose sight of the bear after he goes 10 yards. I'm not really wanting to track a wounded brown for a mile. The blacks I've taken have only gone about 20 yards and then piled up. Is a brown much the same or do they go farther?

  2. #2
    Member 0321Tony's Avatar
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    I think it depends on the bear my wife shot one with a rifle and got both lungs I gave him an hour before picking up the bloodiest trail I have ever seen. Trailed him for about 450 yds before I jumped him and had to hit him again with the ultra mag, she was shooting a 300 win mag. I have also seen them fall where they are hit. I don't think you will get an average distance traveled just make sure he is hit good and give him plenty of time to die.
    Good luck
    Tony

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Have you thought about the string tracker they use for turkey ? In heavy cover I'd be all about using one on a brownie! Bears are funny, you may stick him and he'll just
    Back up and look around then tip over dead in ten seconds or he could do 40mph for twenty seconds which puts him wayyy out there. Let 'er rip and tell us what happened.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    Have you thought about the string tracker they use for turkey ? In heavy cover I'd be all about using one on a brownie! Bears are funny, you may stick him and he'll just
    Back up and look around then tip over dead in ten seconds or he could do 40mph for twenty seconds which puts him wayyy out there. Let 'er rip and tell us what happened.
    BRWNBR is right on. It's been proven time and again a true double lung and the animal has 20-30 seconds. the question comes down to what that animal is going to do in 30 seconds. Also you have to keep in mind, did you get a solid double. Every animal that I have harvested with a bow that went more than 30 seconds did not have both lungs cut.

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    I agree with Fergy all of my bow harvests that were double lung was 5 to 20 seconds until they were down. Good shot placement is the key. I also think that shooting them with an arrow does not get their adrenaline going like a rifle shot does at least this is what I have seem on black bears never shot a brown bear.

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    I think it's the lack of shock and not noise that changes the bears
    Reaction. I really doubt they even hear most
    The rifle shots. But a quick razor slice is pretty calm and quiet....
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    I think it's the lack of shock and not noise that changes the bears
    Reaction. I really doubt they even hear most
    The rifle shots. But a quick razor slice is pretty calm and quiet....
    I think you hit the nail on the head there Jake. I have seen more then critter shot with a bow and go back to feeding then do a little wobble and fall over. I do like the stringer idea and we used to use them but I wonder how well they would hold up in the alder... Now we just need to figure out how to attach them to a bullet for those less then perfect shots that hunter make on Occasion... op a good double lung shot the bear shouldn't go far but the one thing with bears I have seen consistently is thier ability to be inconsistent...

  8. #8

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    Mine made it less than 40 yards before it died in site. A double lunged bear won't make it far. A single lung bear probably won't die. I tried the stringer on my bow for shooting geese on the ground on the tundra. The arrows flight was affected too much, so there is no way I would ever consider using them on a big game critter, especially a brown bear.

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    Even at 20 yards your arrow was to messed up?
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  10. #10

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    Yup, about 10 yards out and it was dropping fast. Was hoping to be able to find the arrows that snaked into the tundra, but I couldn't hit anything with it installed so I took it off and started killing again.

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    hmmm now I am interested we used to use them deer hunting back in the day and never had those problems at closer ranges,our only problem was cleaning up the mess of string in the brush..gonna have to pick one up and do some experimenting

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    Maybe need a bigger bow with heavier slower arrows. Bows were slower back in the day and more forgiving, bet these new fast light arrows are touchy.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    Maybe need a bigger bow with heavier slower arrows. Bows were slower back in the day and more forgiving, bet these new fast light arrows are touchy.
    Touchy is all in the set up ...lol. I' ve got several different bows in my garage from heavy hunting to a spot target bow to an alpha burner pushing 320 plus just need to find the stringer now... Haven't seen one in years...

  14. #14

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    Thats interesting on the string trackers...I know a bunch of guys using them on turkeys before the guillotines and now magnus head choppers came out and they worked fine. I have a design for a velcro'd holder for my stickbow I'm sure would work on any bow if there's room (bow quiver might get in the way). Buddies are using it with great success and noticing 0 deflection out to 25/30 though most are shooting much much closer.

    One thing they did talk about was where it was mounted, though most of the guys were using them with trad gear there were some wheelie bow boys using them also with good success.

    The string itself is getting hard to find and at this point the higher 30lb line is all but gone. If you find the heavier string tracker line let me know I'll be buying a couple! The lighter line is pretty much junk but when its all you have?!?!?!?!

    My grizz made it 75 or so yards and went for the only thick spot in the woods like a laser guided bomb. It didnt make it thankfully. But I have tracked more than a few threw the thick stuff, no fun! Put the arrow in the right spot and you'll be fine but expect to track them through the thick crap!!! plan on it! I'd have a shotgun and slugs in hand for the stand/trail job and really look at my backup buddie with a close eye! I've been in front of a few posse's that I was more worried about getting leveled from behind than mauled from in front.

  15. #15

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    Thanks for all the input. I'm not worried about the hunting partner. He can drill the size of a quarter at 100 yrds all day long and I do plan on taking a rifle with me (along with the .44 mag pistol), just trying to decide on .44 mag carbine, shotgun with slug or .375H&H.

    If we can actually get out on the river and hunt (blasted no breakup) and I get him, I'll post pics.

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    A 44 carbine is not a backup gun if
    That helps you narrow it down.
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  17. #17

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    I have saw this problem with the string trackers when mounting them in the stabilizer hole. I moved my mount above the arrow and it did not change anything under 25 yards. They worked very well.

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    Dont even worry about having to encounter a live bear. if you put that arrow with any razor blade through the animal where it is supposed to be hit, it is going to die. nothing can live without oxygen to the brain, and if you cut out the supply of oxygen (double lung shot) then the animal cannot push very far. i have had bears go 10 yards and walk in a circle and lay down calm as day after taking a broadhead to the lungs, and i have also seen them go onto their back legs as soon as the arrow hit them and they take off like bats out of hell. i have never seen any animal go farther than 60 or so yards when double lunged. Like i said, just make sure that arrow hits them lungs and it will all work out. Good luck!! oh and btw, a 45-70 is a **** good brush gun.

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    What's a "brush gun"?
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    Brush gun is a slang term that i have heard used. It is a gun which is easy to maneuver through the thicker stuff like alders. For example, if you are tracking a wounded bear through alders, a long barreled rifle is harder to keep on point than a shorter barreled rifle. I like my 45-70 for that exact reason. The barrel is shorter than most other rifles, and it packs a large amount of punch so when i do have to track wounded bears in the brush, I prefer my 45-70 over my 375 H&H. Does that make sense or do i sound like a complete idiot??? I didn't coin the term, just used it.

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