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Thread: Multiday trip - how do you keep your fish fresh?

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default Multiday trip - how do you keep your fish fresh?

    How do you multidayers keep your halibut or rockfish/ling when you are staying out on the water?

    Head and gut, keep whole, fillet and leave the skin on - each on glacier ice??

    If you fillet them (must leave skin on per regs) what do think about the skin slime getting on your meat?

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    wrap in clear wrap , then pack in ice works graet don't soake in water leave shin on [ for the regs] never had a problem

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Don't keep anything till the day or two before you depart.
    Glacier ice on everything.
    Have some friends that run a generator to power the small freezer (5 cu/ft) on board and it doesn't count against your limit once it's processed and frozen.
    BK

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    Quote Originally Posted by bkmail View Post
    Don't keep anything till the day or two before you depart.
    Glacier ice on everything.
    Have some friends that run a generator to power the small freezer (5 cu/ft) on board and it doesn't count against your limit once it's processed and frozen.
    BK
    Correct for rockfish, lings, and salmon. Possession rules for halibut are different - 2 days of limits, processed or not, with strict rules on processing - no more processing than cutting each fish into 4 fillets plus 2 cheeks with skin on.

    Big_E

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I usually fillet the fish, leave the skin on and put the fillets in gallon ziplocks on ice in a large cooler. Larger fillets go in trash bags.

    If I had a bigger boat I'd get a mini freezer and run it off a generator.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

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    I like getting glacier ice if i can and 1gal zip locks work great for keeping fillets until your home.

    Sweepint
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    Member AKluvr95's Avatar
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    I was wondering about larger halibut fillets since they're required to have the skin on. We've used gallon bags with great success. My issue was anything over ~25# and you're not going to get the entire fillet in one gallon bag. A friend recently brought jumbo [2.5 gal] sized bags on his first shrimping trip because he heard how big AK Spots were. He donated the leftovers to the boat and I plan on making sure there added to our checklist so they're always available. Now for you guys who like to kill those bigger fish it looks like they've got you covered too with the new XL bags @ 10 gallons. http://www.walmart.com/ip/Heavy-Duty...-Bags/14089250
    On a side note: since I don't have an ESPAR I'm forced to deal with the excessive moisture that comes with a propane heater. The jumbo sized bags work great for protecting paper items such as the PWS Cruising Guide and operator manuals for our electronics.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    I usually fillet the fish, leave the skin on and put the fillets in gallon ziplocks on ice in a large cooler. Larger fillets go in trash bags.

    If I had a bigger boat I'd get a mini freezer and run it off a generator.

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    Halibut skin: my understanding is that if each fletch has some skin on it, so that you can tell if it's white or dark, it's OK. You don't have to leave all the skin on. Keeping the fletches whole and leaving some skin on is so that they can easily count how many halibut you have. Tougher for us small boaters when we catch a large one.
    Richard Cook
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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I like that approach New Moon. That would make sense to keep them so that you can tell which side the fillet came off of.

    On day trips, I will fillet them onboard (small boat = don't need the head and guts weight) and bag the bigger ones into trash bags and get them on ice....but I really would like to get rid of the skin altogether - it slimes up.

    I always use gallon and 2.5 gal bags for salmon (sometimes the bigger reds/silvers just won't fit a gallon bag). Usually putting flesh to flesh with 2 fillets per bag - or maybe 4 per 2.5 gal bag.

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    If you leave em whole and just gut em and keep on ice they will last longer.

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    sluch ice is best, head & gut.....bleed as soon as you can then get into sluch ice. once you open the flesh your exposing to any bacteria & whatnot...wait to fillet till your on your way back to dock.....how long you talking for 2-3 days? i'd let hang overboard to bleed out then get into slush ice till i was ready to fillet....i use 150 qt coolers too

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    It'll just be for 2 days or so. I headed and gutted a bunch or reds last year and took them back that way. They kept better, but I did not like filleting them after being headed and gutted. Halibut I could do that with for sure.

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    do check the regs on the Butt , on how to cut your fish up as I don't agree with what was said here an I could be wrong so do check the regs before you do it because you pay for your mistakes not this forum ,

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    Quote Originally Posted by vaaler View Post
    Correct for rockfish, lings, and salmon. Possession rules for halibut are different - 2 days of limits, processed or not, with strict rules on processing - no more processing than cutting each fish into 4 fillets plus 2 cheeks with skin on.

    Big_E
    RE: Possession you are spot on. Remember that once stored permanently (i.e. freezer - even if on board), it's out of your possession. Period. Possession limits are "reset".

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    Member NewMoon's Avatar
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    The halibut regs:

    28. Sport Fishing for HalibutóAreas 2C, 3A, 3B, 4A, 4B, 4C, 4D, 4E
    • (1) In waters in and off Alaska:
      • (a) The sport fishing season is from February 1 to December 31;
      • (b) The daily bag limit is two halibut of any size per day per person unless a more restrictive bag limit applies in Federal regulations at 50 CFR 300.65; and
      • (c) No person may possess more than two daily bag limits.

    • (2) No person on board a charter vessel referred to in 50 CFR 300.65 and fishing in Regulatory Area 2C shall take or possess any halibut that:
      • (a) With head on, is greater than 45 inches (114.3 cm) and less than 68 inches (172.7 cm) as measured in a straight line, passing over the pectoral fin from the tip of the lower jaw with mouth closed, to the extreme end of the middle of the tail, as illustrated in Figure 3; and
      • (b) If the halibut is filleted the entire carcass, with head and tail connected as a single piece, must be retained on board the vessel until all fillets are offloaded.


    (3) In Convention waters in and off Alaska, no person shall possess on board a vessel, including charter vessels and pleasure craft used for fishing, halibut that has been filleted, mutilated, or otherwise disfigured in any manner, except that:
    • (a) Each halibut may be cut into no more than 2 ventral pieces, 2 dorsal pieces, and 2 cheek pieces, with skin on all pieces; and
    • (b) Halibut in excess of the possession limit in paragraph (1)(c) of this section may be possessed on a vessel that does not contain sport fishing gear, fishing rods, hand lines, or gaffs.
    Richard Cook
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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    So how much skin on each piece?

    I usually pull my cheeks off without the skin - old habit, have to keep that in mind.

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    The State Police and other officials I've talked with didn't say what the absolute minimum amount is - but they said the small patch I leave on (maybe 2" by 2" or even less) is fine.
    Richard Cook
    New Moon (Bounty 257)
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    • (2) No person on board a charter vessel referred to in 50 CFR 300.65 and fishing in Regulatory Area 2C shall take or possess any halibut that:
      • (a) With head on, is greater than 45 inches (114.3 cm) and less than 68 inches (172.7 cm) as measured in a straight line, passing over the pectoral fin from the tip of the lower jaw with mouth closed, to the extreme end of the middle of the tail, as illustrated in Figure 3; and
      • (b) If the halibut is filleted the entire carcass, with head and tail connected as a single piece, must be retained on board the vessel until all fillets are offloaded.






    I am not grasping the meaning of the red text......Maybe I just need more coffee this morning.

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    There is a size limit in 2C fishery. Does not pertain to us in southcentral.

    BK

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    It's a reverse slot limit for the charter guys. A few years back they limited the SE charter guys to one halibut less than 35". Problem was that took away the chances at a trophy fish for a guided fisherman. Who wants to pay $250/day for a 35" fish? So they redid the regs to allow for a small halibut or have that chance at a "trophy" over 68".
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

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