Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Chinook Habitat

  1. #1
    Member Sobie2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    1,039

    Default Chinook Habitat

    Ok lets talk about Chinook and where they can be found.

    I have read over time that the big ones can should be fished for in no more than 60' of water. I have caught plenty of smaller 28" feeder kings in many places, out in the open in 125' feet of water.

    I have heard of kings being teased off of reefs...

    I have heard of big kings being caught while halibut fishing.


    Anyone else?

    Sobie2

  2. #2
    Member JR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,129

    Default

    My experience is only in the salt around Deep Creek but we used to catch the big late run kings in 10-20 feet of water. Literally trolled just outside the breaking waves.

    Sent from my HTC One X using Tapatalk 2
    2007 Kingfisher 2825 - Stor Fisk

    Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top. -- Hunter S. Thompson

  3. #3

    Default

    My rules are follow the food, watch the light, and look for cover. They can come real shallow when the food is there with some cover, especially in lower light. A couple of years back we pulled a 60+ pounder out of a kelp bed in 13' of water- early in the morning on an overcast day. Bait was moving past the kelp bed, and apparently it would come slashing out through the bait. Looking back over the last 10 years, I can only remember one 40+ pounder that came out of water deeper than about 45'.

    When you start out early in the morning and find them shallow, you can watch them move deeper as the sun comes up and the light gets bright. In bright sunshine we almost never catch them in water less than about 30', and then only fairly early in the day. They go right out from there as the light level keeps rising. By midday, I expect the same fish to be deeper than 60'.

    And when lots of guys are trolling out in open water without luck, we can often smoke them by playing chicken with the edges of deeper kelp beds. Same goes for deep reefs. About where the guys chicken out for fear of losing their downriggers, we start catching them by mooching. Kinda fun to listen to the whining on the radio while looking into the fish box!

  4. #4
    Member Sobie2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    1,039

    Default

    I think 270ti is too busy out fishing/catching to reply to this thread. Awesome info BrownBear. I have been wanting to up my game. I can catch regular Kings like nobody's business yet, I have never been able to catch the big ones like others. And when you look over time at various derby results, you see the same names, and often you see the same names in the leader positions.

    There is definately an art or skill to consistently catching big kings, and I believe that habitat is one of the biggest elements.

    Sobie2

  5. #5

    Default

    I wish I was busy fishing..(grin) I actually start on the 26th of this month, and get done Oct 20th. Long season this year. I've got over 70 charters on the books, I'll be powertrolling out of my own boat in Sept, and shrimping out of my boat in Oct. I went "all in" for commercial fishing this year, with a boat, a powertroll permit, and a pot shrimp permit.

    All I know are the spots that I traditionally catch big kings. Several different features exist... Shallow flats, with a kelp line, sometimes on the inside of points, seem to hold big ones. Then you have wash rocks. Generally a wash rock, 50-100ft of water, and the savvy charter boats fight for position in the "sweet" spots in front of these rocks. Usually at a tide change, they'll be a little snap, and a big one will jump on somebodies cut plug. Then you have points. And then, some guy floating around, drops down a herring for halibut and pulls up a 60lb'r.. (grin)

    So in other words, they could be on several different kinds of structure. Typically, your odds increase when you identify areas where they like to be, and know when they like to show up. Trolling downriggers isn't as effective as mooching, as far as parking on those spots. You can and will catch some big fish on 'riggers, but it's hard to stay in that sweet spot when you are downrigger trolling. Trolling kelp lines though with downriggers can be very effective though.

    I'd say though that the common denominator to all the spots we pull toads out of is that you are usually fishing pretty close to structure. Open water fishing can be very effective for catching those 15-30lb kings, but being more keyed on to areas, sometimes smaller than the area of an average house, can put you face to face with a toad.

    Good luck this season guys.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    1,098

    Default

    I can only speak towards what works for me and the areas I have fished. Petersburg has a lot of hand trollers that spend the winter doing pretty darn well. Ask any of them and they will tell you the same thing whether it's October or May. Get into 40-50 ft of water and troll right off the bottom. That being said, the biggest king I have caught was in 150 ft of water fishing about 60 ft down.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

  7. #7
    Member Sobie2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    1,039

    Default

    So the next logical question is, do they hang around structure hovering like a bass, or are they constantly moving like a shark? If you could plunk a camera down in a known King hidey-hole would it be circling or stationary?

    Sobie2

  8. #8

    Default

    They move in and out with the tide, IMO. They'll be some hanging there at first light (hint), but it's a tide deal, IMO, during most of daylight hours. We'll float there for several hours in a hot spot, marking feed on the sounder with no bites. Then, like magic, rods start bending and nets waving, with fish showing up on the sounder It'll get hot for a bit, and then slow down. Sometimes you get a slow pick were fish trickle in a few at a time. When there is a bunch of kings around, they'll be a steady bite all day.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •