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Thread: Orvis LA Battenkill V, Fly line Backing

  1. #1

    Question Orvis LA Battenkill V, Fly line Backing

    What is the overall opinion on the Orvis Battenkill Large Arbor V that was discontinued a couple of years a go? I spotted one being blown out for $140 new at an Orvis dealer.. No spare spool, and I understand that the backing capacity is limited. Worth getting? Pros Cons?

    Fly line backing. With the reels I am getting, and the spare spools, I would like to order a bulk roll of backing. Any opinions on who makes some good backing?
    One dealer told me his line, mfd by Angler's connection is waxed. In comparison to Teflon coated by Sci Ang, and Cortland. I am looking for the 30# backing for Kodiak fishing, is that too much?

  2. #2
    Member BlueMoose's Avatar
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    Default Orvis 2 Cents

    Joe,

    I have been using Orvis products for 25 years and for the most part tell you that you can not go wrong however the large arbor battenkill is not the best choice or shall I say bang for the buck " Great Warranty" and Orvis will back, but just not up to specs compared to other products on the market.

    Your statement of the capacity for backing is true!!!! not to mention the lack of a strong strong drag.

    I would look at the New TFO reels, Cabela's " Although" that one makes me cringe, and even the Okuma's same price range better drag more backing capacity. If your looking for more of an acceptable Brand Name name look into the many of the models Ross or Lamson makes however the price range goes up to about $180.00 - $220.

    Most fly lines test out to about 30 LBS that being said I would stick to 20 LBS backing and save a buck or two. Concerning manufacture stick with Cortland and check out the pricing at Hook and Hackle located in PA. Ask for Ron you normally get 20% off your first on line order and will be one of the best deals you find. Tell him Mousseau Sent you.

    I am sure others will provide additional choices.

    Tight Lines and Best wishes

    Richard "Moose" Mousseau
    www.bluemooserafting.com

  3. #3
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    Wink

    You can always use gel spun backing, the disadvantage is that with that type backing a big fish will burry the backing deep through the backing layers as the drag is tightned. The Orvis reels do NOT
    carry the same warranty as their rods!
    ; for them that honour me I will honour, and they that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 SAMUEL 2;30

  4. #4

    Default Gel Spun Rumors

    Quote Originally Posted by LongHunter7 View Post
    You can always use gel spun backing, the disadvantage is that with that type backing a big fish will burry the backing deep through the backing layers as the drag is tightned. The Orvis reels do NOT
    carry the same warranty as their rods!
    Some tropic island guides do not allow you to use it becuase of the cuts it can cause in its handling with a fish online. Two, it can cut you when you handle it. The fine braided line is very dangerous.. Gorrila wire/line is probably the same way. I used it for backing once. What did I know!!

    You have me wondering about that V LA.. The price difference isn't so great between that one and a Teton Tioga for the same wt class.. Any deals on Tiogas?

  5. #5
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    Default Buy Two?

    Joefishin, the largest fish that I"ll use my reels on are Kings, and they will test you! With that said, I own a few LA Lamson, velocity, litespeed that have held up well. The older lamson lp, a large spey reel broke, the spool post stripped, It had a LIFETIME warranty, well guess what, the company went under, Sage bought them out. The reel was sent to Sage at their request, and months later I got the reel back in the same condition! I ended up repairing myself, with JB weld. The point is some lifetime warrantys are not worth the paper there printed on! If you can get a well made reel cheep, buy two that way you will have a spare for parts, spool, ect. in this fast changing market! I have two Redington AL type LA reels that keep on tickin, and believe me the salmon try to destroy them every year! Bill
    ; for them that honour me I will honour, and they that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 SAMUEL 2;30

  6. #6

    Default Make it three!!

    [Warrantees, some not worth SQUAT!!]
    That being said, no joke, I am not going up there without suitable backups.
    I will have at least two fly reels, more than likely three with some extra spools with line. Have three new Shimano baitrunners ready to go too!! Normally, I would have bought Penns, but since they are now made offshore then I want the other reel with a good rep.

  7. #7

    Default Cortland salwater backing 30#

    Be careful with this material. I have loaded a bunch of reels lately and found about three defects in the product. How it will effect the quality of the 30# high vis backing won't be proven until I catch something big to test the line's strength. Frayed sections about a half to 3/4" long inside of a 2500yd reel. Not acceptable at various footage. Maybe it was not prime material, it is suppose to be. These are the ones that I caught,, hope I didn't miss any serious blems while I loaded the spools.

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    Default

    If I wanted an inexpensive large arbor fly reel I'd buy a Redington. Their reels are pretty darned impressive for the price. American Classic makes some anti-reverse reels that are a good value. If you want an lifetime reel look at Van Staal or Abel.

    Regardless of the reel I rarely see my backing. I've certainly never given it much thought.

  9. #9

    Default if I get lucky, I'll let you know

    I hope I can stay out of the backing too, but I am not an experienced fly fisherman.. Need practice, school starts Wednesday.




    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    If I wanted an inexpensive large arbor fly reel I'd buy a Redington. Their reels are pretty darned impressive for the price. American Classic makes some anti-reverse reels that are a good value. If you want an lifetime reel look at Van Staal or Abel.

    Regardless of the reel I rarely see my backing. I've certainly never given it much thought.

  10. #10
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joefishin View Post
    I hope I can stay out of the backing too, but I am not an experienced fly fisherman.. Need practice, school starts Wednesday.

    You're in for a treat. Fighting fish with a fly rod is more fun than you can imagine. Most Alaskan streams require quick control of the fish. If it runs, try to turn it. The amount of force you can put to the fish is determined by the leader or tippet. Fly lines are tough. So is backing. If you lose a fish it's almost always at the leader or a knot. If you happen to get a King on a light rod? Put the tip down and allow it to break off at the leader earlier than later. You'll quickly learn to recognize the difference between a catchable fish and one that has you at a disadvantage. If you do intentionally let a fish break off, reach forward and grasp the tip section of the rod. It'll often get pulled loose by the snap of the line. Once the line breaks the tip is free to go and it happens quickly. That'll ruin your day, trust me. That is, unless it happens to your buddy who's been out-fishing you all day!

    A fly rod might just be a life changing experience. Enjoy it.

  11. #11

    Default

    If it's a warrenty you want. I've used Scientific Angler reels since I've moved up here along with one ross g3. This summer I blew the drag on some kings (had a great day in the salt). I emailed 3m, the makers of SA and they sent me a complete drag mechanism FREE, no questions asked, no shipping charge nothing.

    I've landed some awfully nice kings on my system 2 10-11, ross g3, and even my system 2l's 5-6's.

    There is no point in buying into spare spools with the versitip lines. I wouldnt go without a back up reel and some backup backing and fly lines, but spending 50% the price on a spare spool anymore is foolish imho.

    The advantage of a large abor is to pick up line quick. Have the right sized reel or one size larger and you can do the same thing with enough backing to fill the spool off with your fly line. And you end up with more backing then you know what to do with to boot! Better to have then to need in this case!

    I also stick to 20lb backing and typically just use cortland. Start out behind the fly line with bright orange, then the second spool I go to the yellow. Both very visible and the color change is nice for the pucker factor ! Typically salt kings are about all that will get you past the first 100 yds of backing. Unless of course you snag a king in say the klutina in the tail Then ya just hope ya can breakem off before you loose everything....KEEEEEEERRRPOW

  12. #12

    Default

    Lots of opinions, no "right" answer. Every situation calls for different equipment. As to the original question...I don't like large arbor reels of any make. I use Power Pro #30 as backing on all but my light wt outfits. Yes the PP can cut your fingers but why would you be trying to finger your line with a hot fish on it anyway. The advantages of PP and other like lines are strength, longevity, and small diameter allowing more backing to be loaded on your reel. I regularly find myself into the backing with the fish I pursue here in Florida. After loosing more than one flyline to oversized fish due to backing failure I switched to PP and have solved that problem. I found myself having to change out the Courtland backing sometimes twice a season before I switched to the PP. The sun and salt combination is brutal on all but the very best of equipment and I have found that I can get as many as three seasons out of the PP. Works for me and I'm sticking to it!

  13. #13

    Default What a putz!!! Lessons learned on my vacation

    A few observations.

    I am back on the East Coast. Alaska was a lesson in fishing and economics, and I guess humility.. I bought/brought way too much stuff for the fishing I did. Never used the twelve weight, nor the 10wt, could have shipped the 9wt back,, caught my few reds, pinks, dollies on the 8wt. Love the Tioga 10wt reel, and never got into the backing. SOB!!!!!!! Most of the lures I scored wholesale were the wrong size for Kodiak, too big. Would not bring 80% of what I did.. Loved the guide pants, never used my Neoprene Hodgmans.

    I am still having nightmares about traveling and the TSA.. Also, about being stranded at airports... Never needed my gun, it was nice to have, but a liability against freedom of shipping luggage back. The biggest hassle wasn't the SW500 mag, but the Sony digital 8 handycam.. Also, never use Fedex Standard overnight for fish if you live on the East Coast unless you never worry. I would use Island Seafood again in a heartbeat. One of the few things I did right.

    I met the Alaskan Author and enjoyed his book signing.












    Quote Originally Posted by floridafisherman View Post
    Lots of opinions, no "right" answer. Every situation calls for different equipment. As to the original question...I don't like large arbor reels of any make. I use Power Pro #30 as backing on all but my light wt outfits. Yes the PP can cut your fingers but why would you be trying to finger your line with a hot fish on it anyway. The advantages of PP and other like lines are strength, longevity, and small diameter allowing more backing to be loaded on your reel. I regularly find myself into the backing with the fish I pursue here in Florida. After loosing more than one flyline to oversized fish due to backing failure I switched to PP and have solved that problem. I found myself having to change out the Courtland backing sometimes twice a season before I switched to the PP. The sun and salt combination is brutal on all but the very best of equipment and I have found that I can get as many as three seasons out of the PP. Works for me and I'm sticking to it!

  14. #14

    Default Good tip.. We might try it again next year

    OK, let me start over now. I will start reading more and thinking I already know the answer already less...


    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    You're in for a treat. Fighting fish with a fly rod is more fun than you can imagine. Most Alaskan streams require quick control of the fish. If it runs, try to turn it. The amount of force you can put to the fish is determined by the leader or tippet. Fly lines are tough. So is backing. If you lose a fish it's almost always at the leader or a knot. If you happen to get a King on a light rod? Put the tip down and allow it to break off at the leader earlier than later. You'll quickly learn to recognize the difference between a catchable fish and one that has you at a disadvantage. If you do intentionally let a fish break off, reach forward and grasp the tip section of the rod. It'll often get pulled loose by the snap of the line. Once the line breaks the tip is free to go and it happens quickly. That'll ruin your day, trust me. That is, unless it happens to your buddy who's been out-fishing you all day!

    A fly rod might just be a life changing experience. Enjoy it.

  15. #15
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    Default

    Don't feel bad. I'm sure most of us show up with 5 times the gear we really need when visiting a new river. I know I do. It gets cumbersome but it beats not having the right stuff.

    It sounds like you had fun. That's good to hear. Kodiak is one of my favorite places, and my most favorite place to fly fish. I hope you get a chance to come back, so you can utilize your experience and zero in on more good times.

  16. #16

    Default If I had to guess

    I saw a lot of critters, both in the water and on land. Loved the mountains, and welled up when I saw the Travel channel last night and that new show on Alaska.. I love the place, and I do miss it already. But, you are right, I learned a few things that will save me some grief and money the next time.. Thanks for the words..

    Joe

    ((0ne bad thing, my left hip is acting up because of the flying time ARGH!!))


    quote=Mr. Pid;125621]Don't feel bad. I'm sure most of us show up with 5 times the gear we really need when visiting a new river. I know I do. It gets cumbersome but it beats not having the right stuff.

    It sounds like you had fun. That's good to hear. Kodiak is one of my favorite places, and my most favorite place to fly fish. I hope you get a chance to come back, so you can utilize your experience and zero in on more good times.[/quote]

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