Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Moly?

  1. #1
    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Maryland...not by choice
    Posts
    2,058

    Default Moly?

    Molybdenum disulfide dry lubricant is what I'm asking about. I have a buddy who had a bunch of rounds moly coated, and claimed his rifle shot better with it. He said it's basically a coat of lube that causes less friction when the bullet is moving through the bore so the bullet shoots straighter and faster. Well, I'm always willing to try new things so I made an impulse purchase today while I was going to various gun shops in search of the fabled H4831. When I got it home I read the can, and it said you can either spray your bullets with it, or you can just spray it straight in the bore. This kinda scares me because I have always been told things left in the bore can cause pressure issues and possibly turn your rifle into a shoulder mounted pipe bomb. Has anybody coated their bore with moly? If so did it make it perform better? Did you have any pressure issues? I'm new to the whole Moly coating thing and won't try it until I learn more about it. Is there truly a benefit to the performance of your bullets by spraying this stuff on them?
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
    "Swans are a gift" -DucksandDogs
    I am a shoveler's worst nightmare!

  2. #2
    Member 907pride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    488

    Default

    Which shop carries it? If your rifle doesn't turn into a pipe bomb I wouldn't mind trying it. Sorry if I couldn't help with any info. I was just wondering where it can be picked up at. Thanks.

  3. #3
    Member 907pride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    488

    Default

    I found this on a page dedicated to coating bullets. Interesting-

    If coating bullets with dry lubricants can reduce friction/heat, extend cleaning intervals and, possibly, make barrels last longer, then why doesn't everyone shoot coated bullets?
    Well, there is no free lunch. By reducing friction, bullet coating has the effect of reducing pressures in your barrel. This means that you'll get less velocity with coated bullets than naked bullets, given the same powder load. Anti-friction coatings are Speed Robbers. You can expect to lose 20-80 fps after coating your bullets, maybe more with large cartridges and bullets with long bearing surfaces. In order to get back to the velocity you had before coating your bullets, you'll need to adjust the powder load upwards--perhaps a half-grain or more. That's not a problem ... IF you have extra capacity in your case. If you've already maxed out your case capacity, you may need to change powders, or just accept the slower velocity as the "price" of coating your bullets.


    Here is the link to the site. http://www.6mmbr.com/bulletcoating.html

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula
    Posts
    69

    Default

    So, I up my powder charge to regain the velocity...then the moly rubs off carrying the rounds for a time in the field......
    Anyone with experience feel free to correct me, I have no experience with the stuff.
    Don't want no one to get hurt, but if yore gonna have a wreck, I wanna watch.

  5. #5

    Default

    I played with it waaaay back when- commercial loaded ammo as well as commercially coated bullets and self-coated bullets for handloading.

    The only moly on the bullet that's going to make any difference is what's on the bearing surface, where the bullet meets the bore. The problem is the scraping while seating the bullet into the case mouth, then scraping again as the bullet leaves the case. Try it yourself. Use a bullet puller on a loaded round and see how much moly is remaining on the bearing surface.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    AK
    Posts
    4,034

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I played with it waaaay back when- commercial loaded ammo as well as commercially coated bullets and self-coated bullets for handloading.

    The only moly on the bullet that's going to make any difference is what's on the bearing surface, where the bullet meets the bore. The problem is the scraping while seating the bullet into the case mouth, then scraping again as the bullet leaves the case. Try it yourself. Use a bullet puller on a loaded round and see how much moly is remaining on the bearing surface.
    Not to mention any remaining is gone in the first 1/4" of barrel?

    Seems there was a thread on this in the re-loading forum a while back and several respected members agreed it was essentially a marketing tool.

    I think if your worried about how smooth your barrel is, fire lapping makes more sense, at least in my crazy head!

  7. #7

    Default

    And if you wanna wear latex gloves all the time, I've thought about Doin the same. But to do it properly u must clean the crap out of your barrel. Thought, about it, and for someone like myself who doesn't shoot more than 100 rounds a year, it's not worth it to me. My triple shocks shoot just fine w/o moly

  8. #8

    Default

    The biggest gain I see to moly is that barrel cleanin is not really needed any more.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hunt/trapak88 View Post
    The biggest gain I see to moly is that barrel cleanin is not really needed any more.
    Huh. Never heard that.

    I went through all the prelims and used moly's over a couple of days prairie dog popping. Call it around 1k rounds through 3 rifles. Lotta cleaning needed.

  10. #10
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,055

    Default

    I always thought it was a marketing gimmick. I tried them... didn't reduce cleaning, made accuarcy worse. So I kinda just forgot about them.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,462

    Default

    I tried coated bullets as well...maybe ten years ago or so. Nosler's Failsafe was a coated bullet. In addition to other manufacturers, Barnes was producing an odd looking, bright blue-coated version of their X bullet (this is preceding the TSX). The old X bullet was a bore fouling monster, and my rifles either liked them or not and there was no changing that chemistry. The coated X's fouled less and some guys found the coated X's to shoot better than the original X's, but I personally didn't find that the coated X's were any better for my handloading applications. I also didn't like the idea of the coating being stripped-off in the bore as the bullet moved down the barrel (and it did). BTW, you still had to clean your rifle when using coated bullets. Barnes published different load data for their coated bullets during that time frame, i.e., usually a grain or two higher for the coated X as compared to the X for that same caliber and wt.

  12. #12
    Member Alangaq's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hey! If I look thru this empty beer bottle, I think I can see Russia from here!!!
    Posts
    1,232

    Default

    I have always wanted to play with it, but on some cast bullets to see if I could drive them a bit faster with a harder alloy... never got around to it..
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    62

    Default

    Forget the spray on stuff entirely. It is good as a dry lube for moving parts, but there are other dry lubes.

    Moly coating or plating of bullets is real. It will not make your rifle more accurate, nor will it increase your velocity. It will not make you run faster, jump higher, or improve your SAT scores. It will not make your girlfriend more attractive. It will reduce friction, and reduce (not eliminate) the frequency of required bore cleaning.

    You do need to clean your barrel before you start shooting moly. You will want to be sure that you get all the copper out of your barrel before you start shooting moly bullets, as layering moly and copper will not help anything. JB bore paste is your friend there.

    Moly will reduce friction, and as such, pressure. You will lose velocity given the same powder charge. You can safely add to that powder charge and regain the lost pressure.

    BrownBear makes a good point that the only part of the bullet that matters is the bearing surface (as far as moly is concerned). I have pulled lots of moly coated bullets from loaded rounds. I find that very little, if any moly is removed by the case neck. That being said, I don't crimp, and I've never pulled a moly coated bullet from a factory loaded round. I've gone over 1K rounds in a 223 before accuracy dropped off and I had to clean the bore to get accuracy back.

    The one big drawback of moly (aside from the very cool silver thumb and forefinger) is that it will not do a CM bore any favors. It will collect moisture and encourage corrosion in chrome moly barrels, in my experience. Just another reason for stainless barrels.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Veneta, OR
    Posts
    1,156

    Default

    cwh describes allowing moly coated bullets into one's "world" perfectly .... I've pushed many, many thousands of moly coated bullets through my rifles with not so much as a gliche or problem - "IF" you are looking for a clean patch when cleaning "post moly" then you will be cleaning for a long time ...... I learned the hard and expensive wasting bullets way that the spray moly lube is not the right stuff and actually goes on unevenly enough to imbalance the bullets and spoil accuracy - step 1) wash bullets in HOT tap water with a little "Dawn" detergent then rinse thoroughly with more HOT tap water and dry completely step 2) put in the vibrator tub with 1/4 to 1/2 tsp of moly powder (no need for ball bearings or such as the bullets with impact each other) step 3) after 90 - 120 minutes take bullets out (use goggles and do it in the FRESH AIR as the dust isn't good for "us") 4) put the bullets in clean corn cobb (does not need to be new each time, use your common sense) step 5) sort the bullets, they will be nice and shiny AND won't rub moly residue onto your fingers now, and load - the moly does attact moisture so be aware of that with CM barrels - I have had many 400 - 500 round days in PD towns and just push 4-5 wet patches followed by 6-8 dry patches then treat with a quick dose of TETRA oil and ready for another day ..... As far as losing pressure and adjusting your loads, the only real time there is "work" involved is when you have a load that fills the case 100%, you will probably need to drop back to a little faster powder and advance CAREFULLY - Works great .......

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •