Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Refinish on my Scott

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    12

    Default Refinish on my Scott

    I'm sanding off the old finish on the ash gunwale trim of my Scott Hudsonbay. I'm going to use Eiphanes for the refinish. My question is what do I use in the crack (if anything) between the two halves of gunwale? And if I follow the directions on the can, many coats will be enough?.
    I have one liter should I order another can??

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    553

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GOJOE View Post
    I'm sanding off the old finish on the ash gunwale trim of my Scott Hudsonbay. I'm going to use Eiphanes for the refinish. My question is what do I use in the crack (if anything) between the two halves of gunwale? And if I follow the directions on the can, many coats will be enough?.
    I have one liter should I order another can??
    I would recommend useing bedding compound between the hull and the gunwales as well as the the crack between them.
    If you weren't planning to remove the gunwales this adds quite a bit more work but the bedding compound keeps water from wicking between the wood and fiberglass and promoting rot.
    I would not go less than at least 3 coats of varnish with a few more being better yet.
    I think a liter is plenty of varnish if you are just doing the wales and thwarts.
    hope this helps

  3. #3
    Member bobmikk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    359

  4. #4
    New member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oyster View Post
    I would recommend useing bedding compound between the hull and the gunwales as well as the the crack between them.
    If you weren't planning to remove the gunwales this adds quite a bit more work but the bedding compound keeps water from wicking between the wood and fiberglass and promoting rot.
    I would not go less than at least 3 coats of varnish with a few more being better yet.
    I think a liter is plenty of varnish if you are just doing the wales and thwarts.
    hope this helps
    I'm not going to remove the gunwale trim, but I did remove the spray skirts, to made make sanding easier. What is bedding compound and how is it used?

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    553

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GOJOE View Post
    I'm not going to remove the gunwale trim, but I did remove the spray skirts, to made make sanding easier. What is bedding compound and how is it used?
    Bedding compound is a thick oil based product that is applied to the mating surfaces before assembly that remains flexible to seal the joint from water intrusion, and also does not adhere hard so the parts can be disassembled later.
    Jamestown distributors sells a few different ones.
    I have read where some people use window glaze or plumbers putty, I have no experience with that.

  6. #6
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    KP, the dingleberry of Alaska
    Posts
    1,750

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GOJOE View Post
    I'm not going to remove the gunwale trim, but I did remove the spray skirts, to made make sanding easier. What is bedding compound and how is it used?
    Sikaflex; basically a high-dollar caulk.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    553

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    Sikaflex; basically a high-dollar caulk.
    Hi cdubbin,
    I know sikaflex makes many products, but the stuff I used in the past had such strong adhesive properties that you would destroy the wales if you tried to remove them again for repair or refinish.
    Just a heads up.

  8. #8
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    KP, the dingleberry of Alaska
    Posts
    1,750

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oyster View Post
    Hi cdubbin,
    I know sikaflex makes many products, but the stuff I used in the past had such strong adhesive properties that you would destroy the wales if you tried to remove them again for repair or refinish.
    Just a heads up.
    Yeah it's pretty goopy stuff but if he's just sealing a small seam with it, it shouldn't adhere enough to cause any damage. Could prob just knife it for removal.

    P.S. (Oyster knows WAAAYYYY more about boatbuilding than I do)
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    553

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    Yeah it's pretty goopy stuff but if he's just sealing a small seam with it, it shouldn't adhere enough to cause any damage. Could prob just knife it for removal.

    P.S. (Oyster knows WAAAYYYY more about boatbuilding than I do)
    I think I'm with you, sealing a seam not bedding with it.

    P.S I know a train load of ways not to build a boat and only a thimble full to build a boat.
    My loving bride is convinced I was born dopey and been losing ground every since.
    But I'm sure I'm gaining ground.
    She ain't always right, HAH!!!

  10. #10
    New member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Why not loosen the two halves, varnish , and tighten the two pieces. And then proceed with the vanish? It's just a hairline crack.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    553

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GOJOE View Post
    Why not loosen the two halves, varnish , and tighten the two pieces. And then proceed with the vanish? It's just a hairline crack.
    It seems like the places that you can't see rot quicker on a boat, particularly where water can be trapped.
    If you are going go to the trouble of loosening the wales, why not go all the way and take them off?
    Then varnish all sides, then reassemble will some form of bedding.
    I don't know what kind shape the wood is in, but when take it apart you really get the whole picture of any rot that might be starting.

  12. #12
    New member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Thank you guys for the input. It should be done later this week and I can't wait to get wet!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •