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Thread: Warming up boots

  1. #1
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    Default Warming up boots

    How do you warm up your boots in the morning when you are winter bivy camping? I have tried putting hand Warner's in my boots while cooking breakfast, but that didn't work. Any suggestions?

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    Do your boots have liners? Sleep with them

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    Member tzieli22's Avatar
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    Liners or not, sleep with them if you have to. But - these days I use better socks and my feet have been warm almost as soon as I boot up.
    Tony

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    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
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    Take left foot and move it 3 feet forward, then take right and move 3 feet forward, and keep repeating.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Abel View Post
    Take left foot and move it 3 feet forward, then take right and move 3 feet forward, and keep repeating.
    Now thats funny, I know it works too.

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    No liners. I have lowa hunters gtx boots. The last time I was camping it was 5 degrees and blowing 30 mph. I walked until i could feel my feet and that was 2 mountains 4 miles and 6 hours later. I guess I will just have to start putting them in my sleeping bag.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Worst case knock the snow off them then toss them in a dry bag at the bottom of your sleeping bag. Personally when I am winter camping I just put em next to the stove for a bit!

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I have bivied with a stove (a wood stove) but it is sure a lot of work! (I have a kifaru and 12 man tipi (22 pounds total - heavy bivy bag)).

    Sometimes I wrap them in my coat and use them as a pillow to keep them semi-warm, but a liner boot is the way to go for sure.

    What you do not want to do is put rocks in them that you heated up on the fire (to dry them out) - my brother and uncle got the wise idea to do this last year on a drop hunt in the Brooks - my uncle was planning on throwing his away after the trip, but my brother was not...both did!

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    Thanks for the help I guess I will be making room in my sleeping bag.

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    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    I warm up frozen bunny boots all the time by pouring hot water into them, then dumping it out. Your feet are gonna sweat anyway. Works pretty good. Takes a long time if you put on -40 bunny boots for your feet to warm up. No way would I put them in the bag, too bulky. With mukluks it doesn't really matter if they are cold.

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bushrat View Post
    I warm up frozen bunny boots all the time by pouring hot water into them, then dumping it out. Your feet are gonna sweat anyway. Works pretty good. Takes a long time if you put on -40 bunny boots for your feet to warm up. No way would I put them in the bag, too bulky. With mukluks it doesn't really matter if they are cold.
    +1, after day one more often than not my leather boots are wet. I always carry a a pair of goretex Rocky waterproof socks. I boil some water and pour it into the boots to warm them up and pour it our and put them on using my goretex socks.

    This is one of the main reasons I have started using plastic boots. The shells stay outside and I keep the liners in my sleeping bag, no more cold wet feet.
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    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    In below freezing weather I put hand warmers into my boots when I take them off for the night and stuff dry socks in after. Then I sleep with the boots between my sleeping bag and sleeping pad with the boot soles facing to the outside and the rest of the boot usually under the backs of my knees in order to keep them from getting "cold soaked" which often means "frozen stiff". This is for when I do not have a stove in the tent. This has produced satisfactory (tho not necessarily pleasant) results for me down to -20 with high altitude early winter hunts. Remember, it is easier to prevent frost bite than treat it!!! Good luck.
    "Actions speak louder than words - 'nough said"

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I suspect a couple Nalgene bottles full of near boiling water would heat them up in short order as well. Added benefit with using bottles is that you wouldn't have to throw it out once the boots are warm.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by stickslinger View Post
    How do you warm up your boots in the morning when you are winter bivy camping? I have tried putting hand Warner's in my boots while cooking breakfast, but that didn't work. Any suggestions?
    ZIPPO hand warmers. Downside is you can't transport lighter fluid on commercial flights so arrange for fluid on the other end. Chemical hand warmers are a no go. Too unreliable. You never know how long a pack will last and or if they'll generate enough heat. Treat your boots like they're family. Don't leave them outside your 'sleeping' tent. Placing them under a tent tarp doesn't count. I actually place my boots at me head just above my make shift pillow. After all, these items will carry me 10+ miles the next morning. If you 'sleeping' partner complains about you bringing your boots inside the tent tell them to smooch your butt Nothing is more important that gear management and that includes your boots. Take the liners out and sleep with them at the bottom of your feet in sleeping bag. But DON'T leave your boots outside laying sideways on the ground so the overnight rain can keep them nice and moist.
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