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Thread: trekking poles/ shooting stick

  1. #1
    Member Carlak2fl's Avatar
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    Default trekking poles/ shooting stick

    brand? style? one or the other, or both? much appreciated

  2. #2
    Member GDinAK's Avatar
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    Give us a little more info, what type of hunting are you doing and where? Some hunts I use only a petzl snowscopic telescoping walking axe which is a great tool to dig out a camp site for your tent, dig down for water, arrest a fall, anchor something to the hillside etc... If I am going in along way or crossing a lot of streams or carrying a lot of weight I will go with two, maybe one of each. If I need two poles to set up my tent/tarp then then I will take them so basically there are lots of variables. As far as brands I have had great luck with Black Diamond poles and my Petzl Snowscopic axe. There is another manufacture of axes named Stubai that gets great reviews..

  3. #3
    Member akgun&ammo's Avatar
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    I'm trying a trigger stick bi-pod this year. So far, it makes a decent walking stick/cane. And is not too heavy. I'll let youall know how works with handgun and rifle later this/these season(s).

    Chris

  4. #4
    Member AK Wonderer's Avatar
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    I swear by treking poles! I use them for neary every hike I do and even use them on flat ground. They've saved my arse more time than I can remember while climbing through the mountains. They give you a little extra pull when you're headed up the mountains which takes some weight off the legs. Coming down the mountain they take a lot of strain off my knees and ankles and make you much more stable. They also take some strain off your back by aiding you in walking more upright under a heavy load.

    For brand I like Black Diamond. They were the originators of the Flick-Lock connectors which everyone else now copies. I've been using the same pair for five years and they have proven tough and reliable. Don't get talked into wasting your money on the anti-shock feature. Antishock is absolutely pointless unless your hiking across asphalt. Dirt trails, grass, tundra, broken rock all have plenty of cushion when I plant my poles. When I plant my poles I don't want any extra give.

    Shooting sticks are nice in certain situations but definately don't take the place of treking poles.

  5. #5
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    I carry trekking poles for three main reasons: side hilling on the steep stuff, crossing streams and carrying out heavy loads. I have two places where I've crossed a steep side hill without them and it was a butt puckering experience. Bought the trekking poles and it was SO much better. Helps me to get where others can't.
    I have Leki's with the newer twist lock but have never tried the Black Diamond flick-lock. I like twist locks because there's nothing sticking out but they can be a pain to set up and they take a while when you're adjusting them. Flick-lock might be better.

  6. #6

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    I bought a fiberglass replacement tent pole at Wal-Mart. It was shock corded together, so I cut it into two pieces then lashed it together about three inches from the end. It will fold down enough to go in a pack, and when together it makes a good walking stick. Spred the legs apart and it makes a good shooting stick. Cost about five dollars and I been using it for about ten years.

  7. #7

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    I have this setup from Stoney Point but I think it might be discontinued now. It is a decent rig that is a mix of both world but only marginal as trekking poles. The gun rest unscrews from the two poles and the set comes with a monopod rest too. Overall though, I prefer to go with true trekking poles and I can always find a way to rest my gun. This big bipod is really only necessary if you think you will need to shoot from an elevated position or while standing/shooting over tall foliage.


  8. #8
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    Treking poles - for all the above reasons.
    You can use them as shooting sticks by looping the wrist bands over the opposite stick and spreading them against each other. Works as good as any bipod style shooting stick.

  9. #9

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    How bout just make a standard trekking pole a shoting stick? Not as good as a bipod certainly, but MUCH better than off hand...goes high enough for me to shoot offhand at 5'9...guys over 6' might not work so well for them though I guess. Can shrink it down to use in the sitting position as well.






    Not the best pics showing it them, but its all I got since they are 700 miles away right now. Again not as good as a tripod but I've taken a wolf off of one while shooting in tall brush that had to be a off hand shot otherwise and my wife took a caribou off of one. So they work well enough that we keep using them as they improve the off hand shots quite a bit. Its a compromise sure, but don't want to haul a separate bipod alonng on most of our trips so this is what we use.


    Also can be threaded off and put onto your tripod for your spotter for a real stable platform if you have the time which goes tall enough to shoot off standing up:

  10. #10
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I have a spare quick adapter plate for my tripod with a Stoney point v-rest minted to it that I carry above tree line. I like the idea of mounting one to the top of my BD poles but I tend to spend a lot of time with the top of the pole in my palm like a cane and wouldn't be able to do that with the v rest so I decided against it.

    I am a dedicated two pole user in the mountains and BD flick locks have earned my respect over the last 5 years. I have spent zero time trying "new" poles and won't until my contour elliptical aluminum poles finally die. I trust them which is key considering I have really leaned on them in pretty steep terrain where a failure could lead to a potentially fatal fall. I weighed in at 290 lbs last season and carried out a 110lb pack. I know of very few other people who will ever see a combined load of over 400lbs on the hoof.

    For bear and moose especially now that the kids are hunting with me I take a trigger stick monopod. I haven't used it beyond the range but it adjusts super quick and seems to lock tight. It doesn't meet my needs for real mountain hunting but for thicker brush, swamp land and tall grass it seems to be perfect. Hopefully we can put it to real field use in the next couple weeks and make up for the missed opportunity I had on a nice cinnamon last year when it walked out of the clearing while I struggled to find a suitable rest.

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