Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Proper hide prep??

  1. #1
    Member AK Fishkiller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Soldotna, Alaska
    Posts
    123

    Default Proper hide prep??

    So I have skinned out lots of game for food, but have never skinned a bear, planning on a PWS trip next week, I know I can skin the hide, but have never done paws or skull, so I've heard chop them off and let a taxidermist do it?? Do I salt the hide?? Please help, I have searched the forum and have found bits and pieces if info.... Any ideas??
    It's better to burn out than fade away.....

  2. #2
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    KP, the dingleberry of Alaska
    Posts
    1,750

    Default

    It's not difficult really; small knife, small strokes....just takes time. I like a nice sharp fillet knife for cleaning fat and meat off the hide. I would definitely take 5 pounds of salt minimum.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  3. #3
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    It's not difficult really; small knife, small strokes....just takes time. I like a nice sharp fillet knife for cleaning fat and meat off the hide. I would definitely take 5 pounds of salt minimum.
    Don't salt unless it's fleshed well.......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  4. #4

    Default

    Keep it as cool and dry as possible. Heat makes hides slip.

  5. #5
    Member akgun&ammo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    983

    Default

    I prefer using something like a Havalon knife. Scalpel sharp, and easy to use. Short and thin enough to get eyelids, lips, ect.
    Swing by your taxedermist and ask him how he wants pads on the feet, and how much hide you need. More is better, but too much is extra weight and insulation (holding in heat). And get any advice he's willing to pass on.

    As a humorous note: Me being left handed.... first time I did front feet (toes and pads), I cut the pads from the "wrong" side. Wasn't a show stopper, just got a good laugh from my Taxy...


    Plus, if you are going to be out for an extended time; proper fleshing and temperture control is important. And Don't salt if you're going to freeze the hide either...

    Chris

  6. #6
    Member akgun&ammo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    983

    Default

    lips: take gums all the way to the teeth. Eyelids- should be self explationtory. Rest of hide, remember: more hide is better than not enough. Your taxy can trim excess off, but it is a pain in the rear trying to stretch something that ain't there to cover a form!

    If you can keep it cool and dry, and you are getting to taxy quickly- let him do the head. But ask if you can watch. It is not hard, just takes time and patientence

    Chris

  7. #7
    Member akjeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    788

    Default

    The last two bears my wife and I shot in the sound came home whole (minus guts). I skinned than in my barn once I got home. I had the taxidermist do the head and paws. I put one piece of glacier ice in the cavity and another on top of the bear. Meat and hide are cold even after a few days. The first one we did that way had the ice frozen to the fur after we arrived at home in Palmer, three days after we shot the bear. Meat and hide turned out great. It is a great way to protect the meat. With the temps the way they are, you shouldn't have any trouble. Here is a pic of last years bear. My wife shot it on Memorial Day and we came home the next day. I skinned it at home. And you can see the fur turned out great. ImageUploadedByTapatalk1367405523.298141.jpg

  8. #8
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    I know you said you know how to skin a bear, but I'm posting these photos I took last year of my Son skinning his first bear. The job is much easier with a few extra tools.

    Havalon Knife with the tough blades makes the fine work go faster. The blunt tip blades prevent cutting through the hide.

    Utility knife with roofing blades makes the long cuts a breeze.

    A small hook really helps hold onto the slippery legs, much safer for the helper.

    Gloves are a must, helps prevent cuts and possible "bear finger infections"

    If the bear can't be skinned right away before rigor sets in, make sure to position the bear in a spread eagle pose to make it easier to make the cuts even when ready to skin.

    Lots of snow and ice this time of year so use that to keep the hide cool and dry and try not to use salt unless you must. A salted hide that is not fleshed is very difficult to flesh later. The salt dries and hardens the hide and the salt dulls blades.

    Turning the lips, eyes, and nose while not hard, does take some practice and mistakes on the face tend to make your mount not come out as good. most taxis prefer to do the head as opposed to trying to fix mistakes.

    A product called "stop rot" is a great way to protect a green hide and can be applied to the hair side.

    Make sure to not make the rear leg cuts too far inside the leg, this will give your rug that "big but" look when the hide is laid out flat.

    If doing a rug the pads can be removed for easier toe removal. make sure to leave the last joint attached to the claw.

    If you do remove the head use your finger in the ear to ensure you cut the ear butt at the base of the skull and don't cut it off too far back.

    A pair of pliers makes removing the toes much easier as well as some cord and a means to hang the foot.















    Make sure to leave proof of sex, I attach the tag through the penis sheath or vaginal opening, this makes it easy to find proof of sex when getting it sealed and also the tags often get ripped out during tanning and if attached to the face, it can rip the skin.



    Old snow can be used to cool the hide.







    Have a great hunt, hope this helps.

    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula
    Posts
    231

    Default

    Excellent photo's Steve ... was that Brooks Range grizz in your last photo?

  10. #10
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Truenorthed View Post
    Excellent photo's Steve ... was that Brooks Range grizz in your last photo?
    Yes Sir.

    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  11. #11
    Member AK Ray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    South Central
    Posts
    2,541

    Default

    One of the things I was told by an old trapper when skinning a bear for a rug was to open the legs up with a spiral cut starting at the mid point of the paw pad and then slowly sprial the cut inside of the leg so that by the time the cut gets to the thigh you are at the mid point of the thigh front to back. Finish the cut near the willy.

    This is supposed to create rug with legs that look equally tappered from the claws back to the main body.

    Since I have yet to spend much time bear hunting to be successful - 10 minutes during lunch while at work does not count for much - so I have not had an opportunity to skin one out.

  12. #12
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    4,836

    Default

    IF you are going to turn the lips and ears and pull the bones out of the feet, a small square razor blade - or 3 will be a world of help to you. I preferred them over my brother's havalon last year on 1 caribou and 2 Griz and 1 black bear that I did.

    Also a stick wittled and tapered to look like the tip of the bear's ear helps a lot in turning the ears.

    If you are in PWS, I would not even skin the head out myself. I do that a home. If you are stuck in camp with rain and nothing to do, then I would go ahead and skin the head out, but I probably wouldn't try to flesh and turn it unless for some reason it was hot outside - volcano maybe! LOL.

    I don't see much for cost breaks on my rugs when I give them to the taxi either way......sometimes she will cut me some slack...but it takes me several hours (8 - 12) to completely turn and flesh a 7 foot bear........why not let the taxidermist do it if they are going to charge you the same amount.

  13. #13
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    4,836

    Default

    IF you do skin the head out.... Make sure that you stick your finger inside the ear - fairly easy to cut it too short. Also - do the same with the eyes - put ur finger in there and make sure that you get enough of the eye so that it'll hold the marble.

    You can skin out the head and not turn the lips and ears - and it'll be good for a couple days if kept cool. Use a game bag and not a plastic bag for the hide.

  14. #14
    Member cjustinm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Kotz
    Posts
    1,004

    Default

    first off..leave evidence of gender attached to the hide, they will get you for not doing that!! i take the paws off at the wrist and ankle and then split the pad (you can cut the pad off or cut around it depends what you are doing with it) then cut off the last joint with the claw attached. pretty easy actually make sure you get between the toes real good or it will make holes. the eyes and nose are easy to mess up the skin is thinner there so go real slow. i take the head off with a knife and slowly pull the hide down as someone holds the head. ears should be cut flush with the skull. you can feel them when you get close. when you get the eye off go striaght dwon and youll hit the corner tof the mouth and make a vertical incision. put your finger in the hole in the mouth and pull forward cutting along the teeth to get as much as possible. take as much cartilage off the nose as possible or it'll spoil. as was said only salt if you have really fleshed it well. the pictures provided here by stid are great.

  15. #15
    Member Antleridge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Southeast Alaska
    Posts
    395

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    I know you said you know how to skin a bear, but I'm posting these photos I took last year of my Son skinning his first bear. The job is much easier with a few extra tools.

    Havalon Knife with the tough blades makes the fine work go faster. The blunt tip blades prevent cutting through the hide.

    Utility knife with roofing blades makes the long cuts a breeze.

    A small hook really helps hold onto the slippery legs, much safer for the helper.

    Gloves are a must, helps prevent cuts and possible "bear finger infections"

    If the bear can't be skinned right away before rigor sets in, make sure to position the bear in a spread eagle pose to make it easier to make the cuts even when ready to skin.

    Lots of snow and ice this time of year so use that to keep the hide cool and dry and try not to use salt unless you must. A salted hide that is not fleshed is very difficult to flesh later. The salt dries and hardens the hide and the salt dulls blades.

    Turning the lips, eyes, and nose while not hard, does take some practice and mistakes on the face tend to make your mount not come out as good. most taxis prefer to do the head as opposed to trying to fix mistakes.

    A product called "stop rot" is a great way to protect a green hide and can be applied to the hair side.

    Make sure to not make the rear leg cuts too far inside the leg, this will give your rug that "big but" look when the hide is laid out flat.

    If doing a rug the pads can be removed for easier toe removal. make sure to leave the last joint attached to the claw.

    If you do remove the head use your finger in the ear to ensure you cut the ear butt at the base of the skull and don't cut it off too far back.

    A pair of pliers makes removing the toes much easier as well as some cord and a means to hang the foot.















    Make sure to leave proof of sex, I attach the tag through the penis sheath or vaginal opening, this makes it easy to find proof of sex when getting it sealed and also the tags often get ripped out during tanning and if attached to the face, it can rip the skin.



    Old snow can be used to cool the hide.







    Have a great hunt, hope this helps.

    Steve
    Steve, what model of Cutco knife is that?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •