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Thread: Jamis or Redline, 26 or 29er?

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    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
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    Default Jamis or Redline, 26 or 29er?

    Howdy folks,

    I have been out of the bike scene for about 8 years, and I'm about to dive back in so I thought I'd get some thoughts from folks who have recent experience.

    I'll be buying mountain bikes for my 13 year old son and I in about a month. I like supporting local businesses, so I'm buying from a small bike shop in Wasilla. They sell primarily Jamis and Redline bikes. I don't know anything about either of them though, so your experiences and opinions are welcome. My total budget for both bikes is around $1200 - $1500. Both will be hard tails.

    I'm also considering a 29er for myself, and wanted to get some thoughts on that for an all - around MTB. I'll be riding it recreationally for the most part, but may also use it for my work commute (20 miles round - trip) on mostly paved bike trails when the weather is nice enough.

    Thanks in advance for the info!

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    Member ak_cowboy's Avatar
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    I haven't dealt with the bike guys in Wasilla, but Backcountry bikes in Palmer has great customer service. They carry Trek and Kona (I'm partial to Konas).

    If you're over 6' get the 29er. I would get a decent hardtail for your son, it'll teach him to ride better than a full-squish bike. he can then get a full suspension bike when he's older and done growing lol.

    Any decent shop should let you test ride them and get it set up properly for each individual.

    check out this site
    http://forums.mtbr.com/forum.php?

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    I've used the shop in Wasilla, and those guys really know there stuff...but I will say they are **** proud of their bikes. YIKES!!!!!

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    I switched to a 29er a couple years ago.... never going back to a 26"....ever.

    I looked long and hard at a full suspension, but I ride too much on roads and hard pack trail to make it much count. Really prefer the hard tail.

    Other than that- no experience with either of those makes or the retailer. Most of the frames I've seen are pretty decent- just look at the quality of the components and it should give you an ideal about the overall quality of the bike.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info guys. hodgeman - thanks for the 29er endorsement. I've read that they are better for handling bigger obstacles, and that's the reason I was considering one.

    I am not considering a full suspension rig at this point, primarily due to price. If I were to buy a full suspension bike, it would have to have a lockout shock, and that is a feature that drives the price up beyond what I have to spend. I've always had hard tails when I rode before anyway, so I'll stick with them. My last MTB was a Giant Rincon.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    AKsoldier- the 29 smooths out the lumps and bump a whole bunch. You wouldn't think 3" of wheel diameter would make that much of a difference, but it does.

    The additional diameter usually results in a different feeling gear set- in low, mine feels like a ground eating tractor, especially pulling my Bob trailer. On pavement in high range I can cruise along and click off the miles. I guess the best way I can describe it is that it feels each gear has a wider band than my 26 had.

    When you go to your shop- spend a few minutes riding around (preferably off pavement), just a quick loop around the parking lot won't really do the difference justice.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
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    Thanks for the additional detail, sounds like 29" wheels are an improvement in more areas than just rolling over obstacles. Now I need to research Redline and Jamis 29ers in my price range and determine which package I like best.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

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    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
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    I thought I'd update everyone here - turns out the shop in question also carries KHS. He had a 2012 KHS Tempe 29er in stock in my price range, and it has the features I was looking for - hydraulic disc brakes, lockout fork... Also picked out an entry - level KHS hardtail for my son. I pick them up Saturday. Now to get this rain to stop.....

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

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    I have always preferred Hard tail over full suspension. Been years since I rode last (Hoping to get a cheep bike this year) but always hated when trying to climb hills feeling like the suspension was absorbing to much energy with every heavy pedal. how every I have always had and used Cheeper mountain bikes, nothing fancy.

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    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
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    I like the lockout fork on my KHS. It essentially prevents the suspension from functioning when you don't want it to - eliminating the issue with absorbing energy. It's ironic that this is the most expensive MTB I've ever owned, but it's still considered to be an "entry level" bike by most.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKsoldier View Post
    I like the lockout fork on my KHS. It essentially prevents the suspension from functioning when you don't want it to - eliminating the issue with absorbing energy. It's ironic that this is the most expensive MTB I've ever owned, but it's still considered to be an "entry level" bike by most.

    Haha, ya. I think the most I ever spent on a bike was $200 when I was 14 lol. They can get expensive, especially now days.

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    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AllAlaskan View Post
    Haha, ya. I think the most I ever spent on a bike was $200 when I was 14 lol. They can get expensive, especially now days.
    You aint joking! When I walked into the shop for the first time to browse, I saw a hardtail on the top rack, and thought "that one looks pretty nice". Then I looked at the price tag. For just under $6K, it's WAY too nice. The thing had a carbon fiber frame. It probably weighs less than my rifle.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

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