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Thread: Purchase from locally owned or box store?

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    Default Purchase from locally owned or box store?

    Who would you prefer to purchase from? A locally owned business or a corporate box store.

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Prefer local but not willing to pay more.
    BK

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    All things being equal (same product, same availability), I go with whoever has the best price.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Prefer local and am willing to pay more if it comes along with expert knowledge and the ability to service/maintain/repair whatever it is I'm buying. As for butchering equipment, I'll admit that I was very skeptical when my brother was trying to convince me to go with a grinder and sealer from Alaska Butcher Supply. I'm a skeptic no longer. The up-front cost was steep, but the quality has led to us saving money in the long run and we get a far superior product. Better yet, when we need service, we can get it from folks who know these machines inside and out. Machines such as those that are sometimes at Costco may be nice, but Costco associates aren't going to be much help when routine maintenance is needed.

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    Member Doug in Alaska's Avatar
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    Just bought a MV31 from Ak Butcher Supply yesterday. I like to know if/when I need to have the machine serviced, I can get it done locally.
    Someday someone may kill you with your own gun, but they should have to beat you to death with it because it is empty.

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    I prefer buying local but living in on the Peninsula Anchorage isn't exactly local to us.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Prefer local and am willing to pay more if it comes along with expert knowledge and the ability to service/maintain/repair whatever it is I'm buying. As for butchering equipment, I'll admit that I was very skeptical when my brother was trying to convince me to go with a grinder and sealer from Alaska Butcher Supply. I'm a skeptic no longer. The up-front cost was steep, but the quality has led to us saving money in the long run and we get a far superior product. Better yet, when we need service, we can get it from folks who know these machines inside and out. Machines such as those that are sometimes at Costco may be nice, but Costco associates aren't going to be much help when routine maintenance is needed.
    ^^^ What he said.

    Furthermore, I'll not only pay more to support a local business for the same reasons Brian stated above, but I'll also pay more for a US made product, whenever one is available.

    There are limits to that, of course. Once a local business hits about 150% of the box store or internet, I start rethinking. However, it's been my observation in the past few years that, in most cases, the local retailer is within 10%, often less. The same is true when comparing US made to Chinesium.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    All things being equal (same product, same availability), I go with whoever has the best price.
    That's the concept I used to be required to teach in High School Economics. That concept doesn't take into account the elsewhere costs of driving out local businesses (who will almost always have a higher price, due to economy of scale) on a local economy and the downward pressure that puts on local wages, which in turn, outs downward pressure on the economy etc etc.

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    For example: I just bought a dipnet at B&J's for about $150 that I could have bought at Costco for about $120 (or whatever they cost), but by Buying at B&J's I supported a local company, that sells locally produced dipnets, thereby supporting a second local business in the process. Additionally, B&J's probably uses a local accounting firm for all of their accounting and tax needs, so I supported a third local business. All of those businesses hire local. Had I bought at Costco, I would have only supported a handful of clerks at that store only. Now THAT is trickle down economics.

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    Good Thread. The mindset to support your community and country has been lost over the years. People are looking for the cheapest price for a product, but don't pay attention to 1) Where it's made 2) The location they're purchasing from 3) The trickle down effect that results from buying everything from large corporations. Everyone here should watch the documentary "Walmart: The high cost of low prices"! Its a real eye opener.

    I for one, hate going to wally world because of all three of those reasons. For all butchering equipment, since i've been here, i've gone to Alaska Butcher Supply. I also reccomend them to others on a regular basis. I recommend them because of the quality of service, the attention they give their customers, the ease of having them right across town, and the fact that their store is all around fun to peruse. I know their prices are a little higher than online or from cabelas, but it is a local business, they own property here, they are trying to make a living like the rest of us. Sometimes, if i see a product that is made in the USA, ill buy it just because of that, whether i need it or not....

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FL2AK-Old Town View Post
    For example: I just bought a dipnet at B&J's for about $150 that I could have bought at Costco for about $120 (or whatever they cost), but by Buying at B&J's I supported a local company, that sells locally produced dipnets, thereby supporting a second local business in the process. Additionally, B&J's probably uses a local accounting firm for all of their accounting and tax needs, so I supported a third local business. All of those businesses hire local. Had I bought at Costco, I would have only supported a handful of clerks at that store only. Now THAT is trickle down economics.
    Where are the dipnets that are sold at Costco produced?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    Where are the dipnets that are sold at Costco produced?
    That's actually a good question, for which I don't have an answer. But even if they're made in the US or even in Alaska, buying from a national retailer still cuts out all of the other local businesses you can support when you by local.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gpaul99 View Post
    Sometimes, if i see a product that is made in the USA, ill buy it just because of that, whether i need it or not....
    I'm guilty of that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gpaul99 View Post
    Good Thread. The mindset to support your community and country has been lost over the years. People are looking for the cheapest price for a product, but don't pay attention to 1) Where it's made 2) The location they're purchasing from 3) The trickle down effect that results from buying everything from large corporations. Everyone here should watch the documentary "Walmart: The high cost of low prices"! Its a real eye opener.

    I for one, hate going to wally world because of all three of those reasons. For all butchering equipment, since i've been here, i've gone to Alaska Butcher Supply. I also reccomend them to others on a regular basis. I recommend them because of the quality of service, the attention they give their customers, the ease of having them right across town, and the fact that their store is all around fun to peruse. I know their prices are a little higher than online or from cabelas, but it is a local business, they own property here, they are trying to make a living like the rest of us. Sometimes, if i see a product that is made in the USA, ill buy it just because of that, whether i need it or not....
    Ive not been in to AK Butcher Supply's business, but I spent some time at their booth at last year's Sportsman's Show. Two things caught my eye:

    1.) There was only one pressure cooker/canner that was US made and it was something like $160, compared to something like $60 for Chinesium. As I said, there are limits to how much of a premium I'll pa. Subsequently, I have, as yet, not bought any canner at all as I still hope tofind the US made one at a more affordable price point. I'm hoping to find an antique at a yard sale (Which is rapidly becoming my only option for quality goods.)

    2.) Pretty much everything else in the booth was Chinesium. One of my policies is "Once you have to go Chinesium, you might as well go botom dollar because it's all junk." I don't recall specific items and proce points at the moment, but they're going to have to close the price gap between Costco some before I buy.

    In the mean time, I'm just waiting for thins to change.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FL2AK-Old Town View Post
    Ive not been in to AK Butcher Supply's business, but I spent some time at their booth at last year's Sportsman's Show. Two things caught my eye:

    1.) There was only one pressure cooker/canner that was US made and it was something like $160, compared to something like $60 for Chinesium. As I said, there are limits to how much of a premium I'll pa. Subsequently, I have, as yet, not bought any canner at all as I still hope tofind the US made one at a more affordable price point. I'm hoping to find an antique at a yard sale (Which is rapidly becoming my only option for quality goods.)

    2.) Pretty much everything else in the booth was Chinesium. One of my policies is "Once you have to go Chinesium, you might as well go botom dollar because it's all junk." I don't recall specific items and proce points at the moment, but they're going to have to close the price gap between Costco some before I buy.

    In the mean time, I'm just waiting for thins to change.
    I think my last sentence should have been a paragraph of its own... That's just something that i find myself doing lately.

    I would never associate 100% "american made" to AK butcher supply, or any store for that matter. I'm sure alot of their stuff is "Made in USA", but they are likely suffering from the same symptoms as the rest of the country: Cheaper to get if off the Maersk boat than to buy from Billy Bob down the road. "Billy Bob" being a reference to the way things use to be in this country... US Citizens supporting the US, not so much the case anymore.

    As for my reasonings to shop there, all still apply.

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    Back to the O.P.....
    I buy local and yes U.S. made as much as possible. Something's are simply better made else where. So I'm not 100% but for the most part I'm all local. My wife loves the simplicity of box stores and she shops at them. To each his own.

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    I wanna buy quality, so what ever I have to do to get the best quality my budget can afford. However not being able to speak to someone about a particular item and get their input kinda leaves it up to you. I like talking to someone in a store who can pass along their knowledge and may even save you money in the long run. There has been several occasions when i thought i needed a larger/expensive model, than after talking to the local shop I did not need such model

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    Member Doug in Alaska's Avatar
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    My son and I brought eighty reds back from Chitina on Thursday evening. Spent yesterday vacuum packing all eighty (except one for dinner) using the Minipac Torre MVS31X I just bought from Alaska Butcher Supply. All I can say is, "Wow! I should have bought one of these years ago. My wife is especially delighted!
    Someday someone may kill you with your own gun, but they should have to beat you to death with it because it is empty.

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