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Thread: C182

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    Member BARTFRNCS's Avatar
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    Default C182

    I currently live in Colorado east of the mountains but will be working 450 sm to the west. What do you think of using a Cessna 182 to commute? I will have to cross 4 passes depending on weather. The highest one is 11500 above sea level. It will just be me and my son some laundry and thats about it. Is it worth the extra fuel and costlier operation to justify a C182?

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    They are fast, stable in bad air and able to climb up enough to help avoid hitting solid objects. There is nothing wrong with a good C-182.
    Years ago I BS'ed my wife into believing I needed to fly back and forth to work in the old PA-12.... Of course since there was an hour of preflight and an hour of post flight.... I really lost time... But who cares.... ?
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    Is it worth the extra fuel and costlier operation to justify a C182?
    Compared to what?

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    Mr Pid compared to say a 180hp 172.

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    Is this trip a daily commute, an occasional commute, or something in between? In any event there will be weather days, mountain wave days, turbulence days etc. In my opinion, even though a 182 can climb high enough, there will be times that the trip will be impossible.

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    Member BARTFRNCS's Avatar
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    Monguse Planning on once a week or 3 or 4 times a month. Yes there are days when crossing the entire range will not be possible especialy during the spring.

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    As long as you have some kind of reasonable scheduling leeway and understanding people at your destination, or the option to fly via airline jet, it can be done. The main consideration is to not let some kind of urgency to get there, result in trying to get there in marginal conditions. A 182 at 12,000 feet is not as responsive as it is at 5000. As you already may know, you're operating leaned out at full throttle with drastically reduced power.

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    why dont you get a 206, thoes are super nice. Could probably get a nice used one for around 100k, full IFR rated with lots of power. If I ever bought a cessna I would get a 206, I heard you can get some of them with a turbine, not sure if thats true or not though.

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    A 450 mile regular commute has a lot of what-ifs and changing weather...

    Is there a commuter airline that folks usually employ?

    I DO NOT know about av-gas prices down there,,,, but around here that would be $500 in fuel alone...one way....
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    I buy Avgas at $6. so looking at 250 one way. the time I would gain would be priceless.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rppearso View Post
    why dont you get a 206, thoes are super nice. Could probably get a nice used one for around 100k, full IFR rated with lots of power. If I ever bought a cessna I would get a 206, I heard you can get some of them with a turbine, not sure if thats true or not though.
    rppearso, if you can find a "nice" used C-206 for $100k, let me know. I'll buy it !!!!!

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    I buy Avgas at $6. so looking at 250 one way. the time I would gain would be priceless.
    Figure 14 gallons an hour for a C-182. ( yes I know it could be less but plan on 14), X 130 mph average means a 3.5 hour trip... So you would burn 49 gallons of av-gas one way, $294 so about $600 for a round trip.

    You sure would build some time...
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    14 gph is way high I know lots of guys getting way less one guy claiming 10 although Im not beliving that one.

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    Flight planning for 14 GPH for a TCM 470 is what I always used. 16 for the 520. It may be a little on the safe side but that's kind of the idea. Fuel consumption high in the Rockies might be a little less but not much. Flight plan for 10-12 and we'll be reading about you soon enough. Good luck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Flight planning for 14 GPH for a TCM 470 is what I always used. 16 for the 520. It may be a little on the safe side but that's kind of the idea. Fuel consumption high in the Rockies might be a little less but not much. Flight plan for 10-12 and we'll be reading about you soon enough. Good luck.
    A little grim, maybe, but right on target !!!

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    For flight planning purposes its always better to fudge your fuel consumption a bit, since its better to have fuel in the tank than not. Call it good operating practice. The airplane over time will tell you how much you are actually burning. I do have a question for you are you Instrument rated? If not you should consider getting that one done. As for the Airplane in question, those are fine flying machines. A friend of mine owns one a Q model, been flying it for 30 years pretty much with out much of a hick up. That here in the Northeast, your situation is a little different but just as demanding. You might want to look at a turbo charged version, for the performance stand point at the altitudes you will be flying. As others has said there are going to be days when its going to be no go charlie, and some days we wished you decided to drive instead. But that is what the earning process is, with flying we learn over a life time by gaining experience, and you still can't get that from a book or the internet. You only get it by doing and over a long period of time, the trick to it is to not hurt yourself or anybody else in the process. Easier said than done for quite a few pilots. There is going to be a lot of things to consider cost wise, fuel is going to be one of the cheapest things in that equation!

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    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    While you might be able lean back to 12 gph or maybe 11 in a 50% cruise... that does not take into account fuel consumed during taxi , run-up, take-off and climb to altitude. Not to mention pouring the coals to her when you find out that you need to get around a cloud system and you are already late due to your trying to save a gallon of gas here and there...

    A friend to mine ran a injected IO-470 on his old C-210 (1960 I think) with GAMI injectors. Each injector tuned to the particular cylinder. He was / is cheap and always ran the motor at 50-60% and liked to run lean-of-peak... Our mutual mechanic was going nuts because of what he was doing to the valves. I think the lowest we ever had that plane was 10 gph... Something you could never due with a normally aspirated 0-470 engine.
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