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Thread: One more from the lower 48

  1. #1
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    Default One more from the lower 48

    Hello all. I have been lurking through the site for a while and finally registered. Right now I am in Alabama, but will be moving up to Fairbanks in June. The wife and I really enjoy pretty much anything outdoors. While I was living in Washington state we would spend just about every long weekend exploring the cascades in my 4runner. A lot of what we know about Alaska is rumor and hearsay and a month I spent up there when I was ten, I am on here to try and make sense of it all and get a better idea of what to expect.
    Probably the biggest concern I have about the move is my dog. I am sure this has been covered in a forum that I haven't found yet. She is a Mutt that i found in Georgia. She has short hair and isn't a very thick dog so I am not sure how she will handle the extreme cold. I have joked that i will put leg holes in a sleeping bag and have her run around in that. How do people keep their dogs from becoming dogcicles other than not having a thin skinned dog? Another thing with her, I usually take her hiking with me but have been told that is likely to attract bears. Is this a valid concern?
    We are both pretty adaptable and find enjoyment in challenges. We are looking forward to the move and all that comes with it.

  2. #2
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    Welcome. I'm new here too, but it seems like there is a bonanza of information here.

    Search musher's forums and retail sites and you'll find dog coats and equipment.

    I've seen the bear issue addressed a few times on here and everything said reflects what I've heard in the past about bears. Don't sneak through the woods. Make noise. The worst thing you can do is surprise a bear. In most cases, they don't want a confrontation with you either. The exception is whether there are cubs to be defended. I wouldn't go out hiking unarmed though.

  3. #3
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Bring the dog and don't worry about the bears.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Cold Spot Feed is an excellent resource for everything dog in Fairbanks. Believe it or not most sprint mushers are running houndy-type dogs with thin coats. So, you've got lots of dog jacket and bootie options.

    It's a good idea to keep your dog leashed on the trail for a lot of different reasons. Bears is one of them. It happens very rarely but it happens that a dog wanders off too far from its human, attracts the interest of a bear, and then comes barreling back. Another reason is traps.
    Mushing Tech: squeezing the romance out of dog mushing one post at a time

  5. #5
    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    An unleashed dog is in far greater danger from porcupines than bears, IMOFO.....
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

  6. #6
    Member Tearbear's Avatar
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    I will agree with Hippie...encountering a porcupine on a hike with your dog, may end up like this...
    Porcupined Dog.jpg
    That porcupine must have been naked after this dog was done with him.
    "Grin and Bear It"

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tearbear View Post
    I will agree with Hippie...encountering a porcupine on a hike with your dog, may end up like this...
    Porcupined Dog.jpg
    That porcupine must have been naked after this dog was done with him.
    Man that poor dog. My dog would probably end up the same way if she saw a porcupine and was off a leash. She can hardly smell anything, but she can see what she thinks would taste good before anyone else. She is always leashed when I have her away from home.

    mlshore, thanks for the link and the info. I didn't know about the mushers running thinner coat dogs. I will definitely be getting her some booties and a good jacket. I am guessing that dogs are like humans, they are most susceptible to frost bite and such in their ears, noses and tails. the ears and tail seem to be pretty easy to protect, but the nose seems a bit harder. Part of me feels that I am way over thinking this and underestimating a dogs ability to adapt, but I really don't want her to get hurt.

    Thanks for all the info, Makes me feel more comfortable bringing the dog up. I know I will have more questions, but I will try and use the search before asking them.

  8. #8
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Dog + momma moose + narrow trails = trouble....keep your hound leashed in this situation.
    "– Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  9. #9

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    Happened to see this thread and timing was perfect. Just got done pulling about thirty small quills out of my German Shepherd's face. After about twenty it turned into a heck of a wrestling match.

  10. #10
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    I was working an environmental job in eastern Washington and some neighbors had pair of dogs that for some reason would never leave porcupines alone. They'd go roaming and invariably come back full of quills, over and over again. They never seemed to learn.
    Tomorrow's a mystery, yesterday's history, today is a gift, that's why it's called the present!
    Approach life like you do a yellow light - RUN IT! (Gail T.)

  11. #11
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    Did a short hop fly-in sharpetail hunt with the Drahthaar. Landed the cub and let the dog out. As I was grabbing the shotgun and shells, the dog (in less than 30 seconds) had found a porcupine and had 6-8 quills. That dog would never go near a porcupine again. Those Drahthaars are smart dogs.

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