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Thread: Anchor Size

  1. #1
    Member DownEastah's Avatar
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    Default Anchor Size

    Just got a 22ft sea sport, wondering what size anchor should i have and any tips for anchoring up for the night. Thoughts on two anchors?

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    Here is a good explaination, I recommend a Bruce; http://www.anchoring.com/article_info.php?articles_id=4

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    2 anchors, 1 as a spare.
    Enough heavy chain (at least as long as your boat). This is what actually keeps your anchor fast on the bottom.
    Secure all shackles with wire or zip ties so they don't vibrate loose (done it....tossed a perfectly good anchor over the side and pulled up the rhode and chain plus an open shackle in Ester Bay).
    Secure only to the bow, never the stearn.
    If using a Danforth, there is a trick to securing it so you can pull it from the rear if stuck. Potbuilder will show you how when you buy your shrimp pots.....oh yeah, you'll want shrimp pots too, LOL!
    We set our anchor and then back away to give a lil tug on the line to be sure it's set securely.
    Pick up a copy of Lethcoe's Cruising Guide to PWS.
    Set your GPS perimeter alarm to aleret you when you drift off anchor in the middle of the night.
    Set your depth alarm on the sounder to alert you when the tide has dropped too far and your about to run out of water in the middle of the night.
    Otherwise, it's easy stuff!

    BK

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by DEMainah View Post
    Just got a 22ft sea sport, wondering what size anchor should i have and any tips for anchoring up for the night. Thoughts on two anchors?
    I'd suggest a 12# bruce with about 12' of chain. 5-1 to 7-1 depending on the weather forecast. As far as anchoring up over night-make sure you know how to set your anchor-which is well worth the effort of not having to get up in the night to reset. We've used a double anchor system-we always set them about 30 degrees apart and of different lengths so that they don't tangle up. Cruising PWS has some good advice specific to PWS anchoring.
    Ruby at the end of a good day.

  5. #5
    Member DownEastah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkmail View Post
    2 anchors, 1 as a spare.
    Enough heavy chain (at least as long as your boat). This is what actually keeps your anchor fast on the bottom.
    Secure all shackles with wire or zip ties so they don't vibrate loose (done it....tossed a perfectly good anchor over the side and pulled up the rhode and chain plus an open shackle in Ester Bay).
    Secure only to the bow, never the stearn.
    If using a Danforth, there is a trick to securing it so you can pull it from the rear if stuck. Potbuilder will show you how when you buy your shrimp pots.....oh yeah, you'll want shrimp pots too, LOL!
    We set our anchor and then back away to give a lil tug on the line to be sure it's set securely.
    Pick up a copy of Lethcoe's Cruising Guide to PWS.
    Set your GPS perimeter alarm to aleret you when you drift off anchor in the middle of the night.
    Set your depth alarm on the sounder to alert you when the tide has dropped too far and your about to run out of water in the middle of the night.
    Otherwise, it's easy stuff!

    BK

    It came with five pots and the line, also a heavy duty davit and low geared pot puller. Spent alot of time on the big water but now its my boat haha

  6. #6
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    I bought a lewmar claw which is very similiar to a bruce.
    When I bought it they had them sized by what size boat they were made for. I bought one a size bigger than what the manufacturer said I needed.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

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    Member DMan's Avatar
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    Personally I like lots of ground tackle. I like to sleep well and having lots of weight on the ground allows you to do that. When I had my Hewes 22' I had a 22lbs Bruce with 26 feet of 3/8 chain. I would drag on occasion if I didn't have a ton of scope out. Its hard to stay on a halibut spot when you are anchored in 275 feet of water if you don't have the weight to keep the scope somewhat shor, even if you have 600' of rode its still only around 2:1. Anchoring overnight I always use lots of scope but during the day unless you want to swing on and off your spot you need lots of weight.

    In my current boat I am running 67lbs of chain and a 33lbs Bruce. I like it. I had to switch my chain out with 1/4 from 3/8 and had the option of going with less (old chain was 63 pounds) and instead decided to add a few more pounds since I have the windlass now. At night I try to anchor in 40-60 feet of water with 90 feet of 1/4" chain (used to be 40 feet of 3/8 chain) and 100-200 feet of rode out. Crank up the espar and get my sleep on!

    My 2 cents......
    ... aboard the 'Memory Maker' Making Memories one Wave at a Time!

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    We anchored our 22 C-Dory all over BC and SE AK with a 5kg (11 lb) Bruce, 16 feet of chain, and 300 feet of 7/16" double braid rope (handles nice if you have no windlass). Our current much heavier 26-footer came with a 7.5kg Bruce and 40 feet of chain spliced to 300 feet of 1/2" rope.

    A genuine Bruce is super sturdy and lasts almost forever. In many hundreds of overnights our Bruce anchors performed well, but were difficult to set in kelpy or grassy bottoms, and did not hold well in soft muddy bottoms. We replaced our 7.5kg Bruce with a 10kg Rocna for the last two summers, and the difference was remarkable. Sets almost instantly in most bottoms, and has significantly greater holding power.

    For your boat, if I were planning to anchor overnight more than a few times, I'd have at least a boat-length of chain, and more is even better for holding power, especially on shorter scope. We usually anchor with 4x1 or a bit less, unless wind is likely to be fairly strong and/or we're not in a very sheltered cove, and then we go 5 6 or 7x1.

    For main anchor, I'd have either a 6kg/13lb Rocna (or for overkill 10kg) or a 15lb Manson Supreme, a similar design. Both are well-proven now - that anchoring.com writeup is rather dated. They're expensive, but for both safety and convenience this is one area in which I would not scrimp.

    For second/backup anchor I'd have a Fortress (light weight Danforth style) FX-11, or a Bruce (sturdier, but harder to stow away).
    Richard Cook
    New Moon (Bounty 257)
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    Member NewMoon's Avatar
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    Since it seems you may be fairly new to anchoring, here's a writeup on the basics of anchoring from my book:

    Anchoring

    In the cruising guides you’ll find detailed descriptions of a great many anchorages along the way. Rather than discuss the anchorages themselves, we’ll discuss anchoring issues and technique (much of which you may already know), with emphasis on the nature of the Inside Passage. If you’re experienced at anchoring, there’s not much magic to it, but recognize that you will need to take into account really big tides, deep water, and potentially tough weather conditions. If you’re less experienced, anchoring safely is not that tough to learn – and it’s an essential skill for the Inside Passage.

    Tidal range varies greatly from place to place, and from one time of the lunar month to another. When the sun and moon are aligned, or directly opposite each other (new moon and full moon), their gravitational effects add together, making “spring” tides which are especially large. When the moon is at ¼ or ¾, the “neap” tides are smaller. PNW tides can be as small as 6-8 feet, or as large as 20 and more. You could find yourself high and dry if you don’t know where the tide is when you anchor, and how much lower it will get over the whole time you’re there. Modern chartplotters with tide tables make this easy to figure out – but make sure you get it right.


    We usually anchor in 25-55 feet, and put out 90-180 feet of rode. We start by listening to the weather forecast, so we know how much wind to expect, and from what direction. Then we figure the tides, and thus the minimum depth we need. If we aren’t already quite familiar with the anchorage, we make a circle 200-400 feet across, checking depths in the area where we’ll be swinging on the hook. We do this slowly and carefully, to avoid suddenly coming across a very shallow spot – particularly where detailed charting is not available. We did wreck our props on one dark day, circling too casually in 25 feet of water, and running into a pinnacle we didn’t see, only 2 feet below the surface.

    If depths look OK within the circle, and we set the anchor solidly in the center of it, we’re fairly sure we won’t wind up aground. A good way to ensure we have covered the right area, and we’re anchoring in the center of it, is to zoom way in on our chartplotter. It shows the scale of the view it’s presenting, so by looking at our track we can see quite accurately the size and shape of the area we’ve checked out.

    We point into the wind, come to a stop, lower the anchor, and after the anchor is on the bottom we back slowly, letting out more rode. After letting out the appropriate length of rode, we shift into neutral, cleat off the line, and let the boat put some tension on it. When the anchor seems to have set, we pull gently in reverse, while feeling the line for signs of dragging. Usually it’s easy to tell whether the anchor is well set or dragging. More often than not, it sets solidly right away. If it drags, we retrieve and re-set. The more wind we expect, the longer our rode, and the harder we pull to test the set.


    If the wind is strong, and we’re not sure of the holding quality of this particular bottom, we leave the chartplotter on and zoomed in. If it’s really windy, we might leave both chartplotter and fishfinder on for quite a while. As we swing on the hook, our track on the chartplotter shows as a crescent, centered on the location of the anchor. If our position moves beyond the initial position of the crescent, we know we have been dragging. Occasionally this happens soon after we anchor, usually because thick kelp or soft mud has prevented good holding. Then we retrieve the anchor and re-set, successfully in most cases without moving very far.

    Ideally we choose a relatively small cove with protection from several angles. If we know where the wind is coming from, an anchorage that’s open for some distance in a different direction may be just fine. But suppose our anchor spot is open to the west for a mile or two, and west wind is forecast – we’re going to feel it when even a moderate west wind blows. On the other hand, if we anchor where there’s only a few hundred feet of water surface (fetch) for the wind to work on, and even more so if higher ground blocks the wind somewhat, we can ride out a pretty stiff breeze without bouncing around much. This is not just a comfort issue, but also one of safety: if waves have us pitching heavily, on the upward bounce there’s much greater strain on the rode. It could jerk the anchor out of its set and allow us to drag.

    We research anchorages with cruising guides and charts, and decide before we travel which ones will probably work for us. When we head out for the day we have our next stop already in mind, but always have others picked out along the way, in case weather worsens and we need to duck in somewhere.
    Richard Cook
    New Moon (Bounty 257)
    "Cruising in a Big Way"

  10. #10
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    It's hard not to, "overthink" it, especially when trying to go to sleep on the hook
    and there's some good advice here,...I'd just add my "Must Haves," for your simplification

    - Go one size bigger than is recommended for your boat size, (which sounds like a 33lber I think, but find the chart somewhere)

    - use plenty of Chain, as that is really what does the work of surge absorbtion,...keeping the anchor biting in, in all material

    - always use plenty of scope, understand the tidal factor,... the scope you thought you had, can disappear over time
    but if you've always got plenty out there, you'll never get surprised that way
    (for example, I have 12 fathoms of chain, and always look for the 5 fathom mark,...so after my chain is out
    I know I'm already 2:1, then my line is marked, with Black Tape every 5fa, so it's easy to throw out at least that much more,
    once I'm at 5:1, for a protected area,...I'm usually walking inside, with peace of mind

    and maybe I'll throw in, "sleep in the bow,... and be suspect of what you hear,..."
    (on second thought, don't do that last one,..grin)

    Set yourself up with Really Good Gear, One Time, so you don't have to worry,....
    I'm a Bruce Fan also, but the knock off's work fine, I also have a 44lb Lewmar now, same style
    48ft of 3/8 chain, for my 36 fter,....I don't worry at all

    considering all the hassle, of the two anchors, I wouldn't mess with that, use one that's Good Enough
    and tho I usually have a spare,...in something like 30 yrs of close to year round work, I've only lost an anchor once,.....
    and I was totally dinking around, trying to anchor in an 8 ft swell in a crazy Tide Rip zone, Commercial Cod Jigging
    I don't think i could even duplicate that day,...if I wanted to
    but spares are always nice
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  11. #11
    Member DMan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kodiakrain View Post
    I don't think i could even duplicate that day,...
    Murphy's Law! Better order a new anchor now!
    ... aboard the 'Memory Maker' Making Memories one Wave at a Time!

  12. #12
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Anchoring is something where going undersize can really bite you, and you'll only realize your undersize when you need your anchor the most.

    If it was my boat, I'd go with a minimum of a 16# bruce or lewmar, 25-30' of 1/4" chain and 600' of 1/2" rode, and I'd consider upsizing the anchor to a 22# and going with 3/8" chain. I'd also carry a backup anchor and rode.

    Thoughts on overnighting, make sure you have well and goodly set the anchor. Some bottom types won't allow a solid anchor set, so make sure you put it in reverse and put some power to the engine to make sure you aren't moving. I prefer extremely well protected anchorages and am more than willing to burn more gas to hole up in a good spot.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  13. #13

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    NewMoon,

    Great write up on anchoring.

    Interesting information on the Rocna anchor too. While I use my Bruce anchor 95% of the time, I have had to use my backup Danforth if there is eel grass or flat shale type rocky bottom.

    Doug

  14. #14
    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    22lb bruce or lewmar with 30-40' of chain is what I would run with that boat. I had a similar size glasply and a 16lb bruce with 20' of chain would not always hold in cook inlet. I went to a 22lb with 30' of chain and it didn't drag after that. I have a 16lb bruce with 20' on my 22' ocean pro that sticks most of the time, sometimes I need a lot of scope, but when I am doing overnight trips I like to drag my 33lb bruce along with and extra 30' of chain.
    Responsible Conservation > Political Allocation

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    Member DMan's Avatar
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    DEMainah,

    After all these opinions curious what you decided to go with?
    ... aboard the 'Memory Maker' Making Memories one Wave at a Time!

  16. #16
    Member DownEastah's Avatar
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    16 pound Bruce anchor

  17. #17
    Member DMan's Avatar
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    Gotcha, Decide on chain?
    ... aboard the 'Memory Maker' Making Memories one Wave at a Time!

  18. #18
    Member DownEastah's Avatar
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    20 ft pretty heavy chain can't remember the actual size

  19. #19
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Is that what the Bruce size chart said, for your boat length ?

    Bruce style is good
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  20. #20
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    No I went the next size bigger, just for good measure.

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