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Thread: Does anybody know the worth?

  1. #1
    Member roughneck6883's Avatar
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    Default Does anybody know the worth?

    I have an old bear recurve bow it's a 1953 bear polar it's in decent shape my the only thing that makes it stand out is the serial number #007 I don't have a book that can appraise it I doubt the price will more than the sentimental attachment but it would be cool to know thanks
    "Horns make pi$* poor soup"

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    Not sure what it's worth, but I'd hang on to it just for a conversation piece.I have a 1950 polar longbow with unidirectional glass, and aircraft aluminum laminate that bear had problems with.I been shooting the heck out of it and the late Frank Scott told me it should be a wall hanger.I just enjoy it too much to hang up, so when it blows up...so be it.

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    Member pa 5-0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roughneck6883 View Post
    I have an old bear recurve bow it's a 1953 bear polar it's in decent shape my the only thing that makes it stand out is the serial number #007 I don't have a book that can appraise it I doubt the price will more than the sentimental attachment but it would be cool to know thanks
    You might be shocked at what they go for. Check Ebay. If you have what they want, u may get enough for a couple new Bowtechs.

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    Member roughneck6883's Avatar
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    Not seeing too much on eBay I don't think I want to sell it anyway I just want to know what I have.
    "Horns make pi$* poor soup"

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    Member pa 5-0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roughneck6883 View Post
    Not seeing too much on eBay I don't think I want to sell it anyway I just want to know what I have.
    And yours looks to be much older.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/LH-CLASSIC-1...item460dfa9e2e http://www.ebay.com/itm/1964-Vintage...item4172a2dba0

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    Member Hughiam's Avatar
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    I acquired a Bear Kodiak Magnum a few years ago and wanted to know as much as I could. I contacted Bear Archery directly and they told me the year it was produced, etc etc and even hinted as to the value. While bear is now part of a larger corporation, you may want to just call and ask.

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    Member roughneck6883's Avatar
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    Well I have been asking around called bear they couldn't tell me anything they recommended a few forums...... I most people said the serial number and year will determine the value but nobody has said anything beyond that . I am stumped
    "Horns make pi$* poor soup"

  8. #8

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    Try calling the footed shaft in mn. I think Lamont is still around. He has a shop full of bears. If that doesn't work email Tj at traditional bowhunters mag or on Facebook. They may not know but can get you to someone who does. Tbm at one point did a good write up of bear bows and values and I believe someone had a web site devoted to bear bow and info. Whoever told u age a number is spot on. Along with condition. That means do not shoot it till u figure it out. Joe or Jay St Charles would be another place I'd call. You can get Suzanne (sister) at northwest archery. She's still building arrows. Lastly. Bob button or bob Wesley are both approachable as is Ron laclair.

    If Tj or Lamont don't help ya holler. I have some buddies who may get ya in the right direction.


    Last this stuff is really what someone will pay. And watch the forums. Lots of talk! You'll know when you find someone who knows that bow and its value!

    I'm curious is it backed with a metal lam?

  9. #9
    Member roughneck6883's Avatar
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    No it isn't in pretty good shape thou the only thing damaged is the leather arrow rest but thank for the info I will give them a ring
    "Horns make pi$* poor soup"

  10. #10

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    This thread on another forum by an authority on old Bear bows may help you identify what you have: http://tradgang.com/cgi-bin/ultimate...;f=14;t=003321

    Forgive me for asking, but how do you know it's a 1953 version? That's also the year for a patent held by Bear that appears on many bows, and it's commonly mistaken as an indication of the year it was made. (My apologies if you know this already.) Here's a picture of my 1958 Bear Kodiak showing the location of the patent mark on the lower limb:
    Attachment 71273

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    Member roughneck6883's Avatar
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    "Horns make pi$* poor soup"

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    dunno if this applies or not but I got the itch to look this up a little, ok I got bored and was tired of digging dirt lol. I remember the bear polars having aluminum from WWII era planes in them as a buddy had showed me one and filled me in years back. I dont know what happened to him he's quitea bit older and moved back to the east coast (in case your a collector, I havent heard from him in years now). He had one in mint shape along with a host of other collector bows. I managed to buy one of the bows that interested me, I never could get his asbell era bighorn takedown. Someday maybe.

    The Wade mentioned in Eid's link is Wade Phillips. couple posts down. I've bought some collectors goodies from him over the years though I've been out of the hunt for awhile now.

    I have the Al Reader articles on dating Bears bows he did a number of years back now. I didnt think about it before as I'm not much into collectiong Bear bows. If you cant find info I can dig them up...between all the articles we should be able to nail it.

    Anyways. here's what I found.

    http://www.stickbow.com/stickbow/Collector/beararchery/

    The Aluminum Laminated Bows

    The first new bow model which was introduced in 1949 after Nelsí departure was the Grizzly. The Polar and Kodiak were introduced in the following year, 1950.

    These bows of 1949, 1950 and early 1951 can be recognized by the lamination of aluminum in the limbs. This aluminum was scrapped from B-17 bomber airplanes of WWII, the purchase of which was arranged from the government by Glen St. Charles. The aluminum lamination on the Kodiak and Grizzly is found only in the inner lamination, surrounded by layers of maple and glass. However, on the Polar, the aluminum is found both under a layer of maple and glass, and on the outside lamination.

    In 1949 and 1950 Bear was using a bi-directional glass on their bows which looks somewhat like a basket weave pattern. Then in 1951 Bear began using a new Uni-Directional glass in which the glass fibers all ran lengthwise to the bow limbs. This is a good way to tell the difference between the 1949/50 and the 1951 models. The 1951 Grizzly also began production with the aluminum lamination, but very early in 1951 the aluminum was dropped due to the high reported breakage problems of these aluminum bows.

    The Kodiak was introduced in 1950 with the bi-directional glass and the aluminum lamination. Then in early 1951, just as with the Grizzly, the new uni-directional glass was introduced but the aluminum lamination was still present. This glass change apparently occurred around serial number 5000. Then in mid-1951, the aluminum lamination was dropped. So for 1951 you will find Kodiaks with aluminum and bi-directional glass, aluminum with uni-directional glass, and no-aluminum with uni-directional glass.

    This aluminum laminated caused two problems. First, the bows had quite a bit of handshock when shot, and as a result were not comfortable to shoot. Secondly, the large amount of shock contributed to a large number of bows delaminating. This warranty problem caused a substantial strain on the companies finances, but Fred insisted that all bows be replaced if returned broken.

  13. #13

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    That's cool. I still have a 26 lb bear polar my dad got for me back around 1965. It was a big deal because he had to work pretty hard to keep us 5 boys fed and clothed. Value is priceless

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by roughneck6883 View Post


    That is indeed the year of the patent. We'd need to see a lot more of the bow to help identify the year. The serial number may not be much help in this instance until we get that narrowed down.

  15. #15

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    This was a interesting thread. This is the worst I have saw one sidetracked. I have a Kodiak magnum that I have had for a lot of years and still enjoy shooting it at times.

  16. #16

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    side tracked? in order to figure out value first you need to find out when it was made. Which in turn will tell you IF its a rare bow or not, and than give you a educated idea of where to go with value. Not all bear bows are created equal. Not so many years ago people were finding extremely rare bows/broadheads and letting them go for nothing unknowingly. Not so much anymore! welcome to the kelly blue book for traditional archery gear of our past.

  17. #17

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    Went to get my Kodiak magnum and found another bear bow I forgot I had. It says super magnum 48 inch with fascor. Serial # kx15188 amo 48 inch 45 lb pull. How can you tell the age and value of these bows?

  18. #18
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    Hadd a Bear Kodiak II. I think I was the first white man to take a caribou withi a bow and that was it. That was in 1953 up Hicks Creek. Gave that bow away in 1954.

    I still have a Grizzly Static Recurve, 65# at 28", Serial No. K-4-6848B, and another that I can't find even mentioned: A Bear Cub, marked 62" at 46#. The Serial No. appears as R. TP 5554.

    I have no idea of the value of either of these two Bear bows that I still have in my collection. These, among others, iunclude a Ben Pearson 65# hickory one-piece recurve, a 65# Woodcraft Eauipment Co. rawhide backed lemonwood longbow, and my favorite Howard Hill laminated bamboo longbow, 70# at 28", Serial No. C-6000. Great memories stay with them all.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by TradBow View Post
    side tracked?
    There was a spam message that snuck in here for a while and has since been deleted. That may be the reason for that "sidetracked" reference.

    As for dating and valuing old bows, one of the best places to start is here: http://tradgang.com/noncgi/ultimateb...ubb=forum;f=14

    The most current and comprehensive source for values is found by searching for a bow in question among the "Completed" listings on a certain worldwid auction site. Just be aware there was something of a bubble a few years ago that has since deflated somewhat after the downturn in the economy.

  20. #20

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    no joke! I was looking for an old school quiver to turn into a side quiver (apache style, not hip quiver like the old chuck adams style) and was floored by the prices of bear anything!!! If you only knew what my buddy paid for a signed pope arrow..or the bow, quiver arrow, photo and letter of authenticty from Mel Johnson, along with a host of other goodies. now its crazy spendy to even think of buying stuff!

    There's another site with some old timers on it, pirates of archery is one some of the more well known guys went too after someone got a big head on TG lol. They are all good and there's people who know their stuff on all 3 of the big trad sites...At is another though I cant vouch for them I havent been on in years. I dont mess with bears so I cant give you a value Cast, but if you follow the links eid and I posted it will narrow down your age search. From there you can find out what its worth. The reality is, the value is what someone is willing to pay. The more rare(r) it is the more likely you're going to bring in a higher bill. The better you can prove its rarity the more likely you are to bring top dollar based on its scarcity and condition.

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