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Thread: what would be your "holy grail" of old rifles if money was no object?

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Default what would be your "holy grail" of old rifles if money was no object?

    if you were in the market, and found the ulitmate used rifle what would it be? What makes it irreplaceable?

    if you already found that gem.....what is it and why?

    I'm always intrigued by older hunting rifles, the craftsmanship put into them, and equally interested to hear some opinions.

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    Member highestview's Avatar
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    Definitely a pre-64 in 300 Winchester.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    My boss has the Grand African model Colt-Sauer 458 Winchester. I would really dig the Grand Alaskan 375 H&H version of one of those, but those are still somewhat plausible possibilities. If money was seriously no obstacle, probably either a John Rigby bolt action in 375 H&H or a Holland and Holland 375 side-by-side.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    one like this 1924 add (groovy choice btw)?:

    Attached Images Attached Images

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    I'm a fan of Newton. He was a guy way ahead of his time in cartridge development, and he designed a fabulous double trigger, but Newton rifle stocks were notoriously weak wristed for the level of recoil the were subjected to, and existing rifles are too valuable as collectables to use as daily shooters... I'm not much of an old gun collector tho; I prefer to keep just a few shooters. Thus, I think it would be cool to have a nice pre-64 M-70 chambered in .30 Newton. That would be a fine combination.
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    A mint Remington 14 in .35 rem with a tang sight....that'd be a sweet lil brush gun.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    An original Hawken, circa 1835-1855. Hallmark rifle of its day and much imitated even today.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    one like this 1924 add (groovy choice btw)?:

    Yes, but the 375 H&H version that they made later on. Even more rare and I already have a 416.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    An original 375 H & H side by side express rifle with ejectors made and custom fitted by Holland and Holland .
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

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    bsa_06.jpg
    A sweet old gun that I have a soft spot for are the Birmingham Small Arms 30-06's. They are post-war (most of them) British made, carbon copies of the pre-64 model 70. They have the 98 Mauser style controlled round feed, good stocks and comparable quality and craftsmanship to the pre-64's (hand cut checkering, etc..). They were cheaper than the model 70 but not as available in America, especially compared to all the 1903 and 1917 sporters that hit the market after the war.

    I do have a major soft spot for them because my great-uncle had one of each, a pre-64 model 70 in 270 and a BSA in 30-06. Those are the only 2 rifles he used in 4 decades of guiding out of Fairbanks. Holding them side by side, they are practically the same rifle. The neat thing about the BSA then is they have no 'originality' value like the pre-64's. I'd feel better about dragging a BSA through the brush and the weather, because you can refinish the stock and metal without ruining any 'value' like the pre-64's. I intend to pick one up when I can find one. I like the idea of running around with the same rifle that my family used for so long up here. Cool guns for sure and sometimes people dont think they are worth any more than a 1903 sporter and you can get a steal on one.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    This is a loaded question... there are a pile of them from around the world I'd love to have.

    At the moment a minty and original Winchester '71 would scratch the itch....of course a deluxe model with the receiver sight since money is no object.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
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    I would be after a double rifle prefferably a H&H or Rigby chambered in 500NE. Why? just because!

    An 1866 winchester would be my second choice, I've got a soft spot for winchester lever guns.
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  13. #13

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    One each of predominant rifles used by the 7th Calvary and the Plains Indians Warriors at the Battle of the Little Bighorn actually used in the battle.

    Model 1873 Springfield Trapdoor Carbine

    1860 Henry (Repeater) Rifle

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-NoNxG2z07c

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DYM2eA6NqQo
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    An original Hawken, circa 1835-1855. Hallmark rifle of its day and much imitated even today.
    If it were possible to identify and obtain, the Hawken 50 that Jeremiah Johnson pried from the "cold dead fingers" of Hatchet Jack in the mountains of Montana, that would be the one "holy grail" rifle ever that I would want to own.

    I, Hatchet Jack, being of sound mind and broke legs, do hereby leaveth my bear rifle to whatever finds it, ...... It is a good rifle, and killt the bear that killt me. Anyway, I am dead. Yours truly, Hatchet Jack.
    "You will never know how much it cost my generation to preserve your freedom. I hope you make good use of it."
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    Quote Originally Posted by highestview View Post
    bsa_06.jpg
    A sweet old gun that I have a soft spot for are the Birmingham Small Arms 30-06's. They are post-war (most of them) British made, carbon copies of the pre-64 model 70. They have the 98 Mauser style controlled round feed, good stocks and comparable quality and craftsmanship to the pre-64's (hand cut checkering, etc..). They were cheaper than the model 70 but not as available in America, especially compared to all the 1903 and 1917 sporters that hit the market after the war.

    I do have a major soft spot for them because my great-uncle had one of each, a pre-64 model 70 in 270 and a BSA in 30-06. .
    That would be the rifle for me as well- I foolishly sold one to a friend before I left Texas and I miss that rifle. It just had something about it that made it special!

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MontanaRifleman View Post
    If it were possible to identify and obtain, the Hawken 50 that Jeremiah Johnson pried from the "cold dead fingers" of Hatchet Jack in the mountains of Montana, that would be the one "holy grail" rifle ever that I would want to own.

    I, Hatchet Jack, being of sound mind and broke legs, do hereby leaveth my bear rifle to whatever finds it, ...... It is a good rifle, and killt the bear that killt me. Anyway, I am dead. Yours truly, Hatchet Jack.

    I can hi jack my own thread for a brief moment......right?


  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    I can hi jack my own thread for a brief moment......right?

    That was one of a bunch of great scenes in that movie... I like how he runs across the top of that mountain snow... LOL
    "You will never know how much it cost my generation to preserve your freedom. I hope you make good use of it."
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    I've had a need for a Bren Mk1 for a long, long time.bren.jpg
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    There are a lot of really neat rifles in the world, many of which would be neat wall hangers. A rifle owned and used by Bell from Africa or a gun that had belonged to Thomas Jefferson or the rifle of Tom Horn. The list goes on and on of guns with a neat history. I hunt big game with a pre64 M70 in 300H&H, small game with a 92Win in 25/20. I have my dads M8 Rem in 35Rem that shoots cast very well. There are only a couple of rifles that I would really like to have and they may not exist anymore. They have special meaning to me. My dad was a recon officer in WWII. 24th Armored Engineers ,4th Armored Infantry. In the army from 1932 until the end of the war. In 1937 he won the Engineers Individul at Camp Perry using a star gauged Springfield. That rifle I would like to have. One other is the rifle a German sniper was using to try to kill my dad. The German lost and dad took the scope from the rifle. I have the scope and would really like that rifle to put it back on. It was a 10 shot semi auto in 8mm very similar to our M1 Garand. GW 43 maybe? Neither of these have real monetary value but they would hang on my wall till the end.

  20. #20

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    Just rifles? A "one of one hundred" Winchester, 1873 or 76. Or any gun, this one.http://neveryetmelted.com/categories/walker-colt/

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