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Thread: Found a little Internet gold.

  1. #1
    Member highestview's Avatar
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    Default Found a little Internet gold.

    Can't say exactly how I came across it, but I found a transcripted interview of my great-uncle Chuck Gray, archived by the UAF. It's full of all kinds of interesting stuff about game enforcement, guiding, market hunting, subsistence hunting, predator control and all the transitions that such things have gone through from the 1950's on. A fantastic read for anyone who wants to hear about the way it used to be and how things have changed. It is remarkable how so many of the issues surrounding hunting are basically the same issues re-hashed over and over again for decades. It's also neat to think about how far enforcement, ethics and game management have come over the last century here. Anyway, here is the link to the article for those who care to read.

    http://www.alaska.edu/files/uajourney/Gray.pdf
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    Member Lone Wolf1's Avatar
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    fun read! Thanks.

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    Member highestview's Avatar
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    I have to say, there are few men on this planet earth whose opinion I respect more than this guy. At my grandfather's funeral last spring, he recounted how our family even got up here in the first place. I'm simply amazed at men like this. In 1942, my great grandfather got a job based in Fairbanks, basically doing the infrastructure construction on the Alaska end of the highway while it was getting built. My Grandpa was 13 at the time, Chuck was 15. Their dad basically said: 'Alright, they're flying my up there, you guys get up here as soon as you can.' The responsibility fell on Chuck, as a 15 year old, to get the entire household packed up and freighted to Seattle, so it could be barged up and put on the railroad, while Chuck drove his brother and his mother from Peoria to Seattle. Literally, the 15 year old drove and had the 13 year old navigate, because their mom had never driven a car in her life (different era, for sure). They had to stop more than once and work odd jobs to get enough money just to get to Seattle and then to Anchorage.

    He was drafted by the Army during the Korean draft, but was sent back to Fairbanks to work military Fish and Game enforcement, then with the US Fish and Wildlife department when he was discharged. He got licensed as a guide in 1951, in the Territory of Alaska, and guided from then until 1994, flying his own super cub most of the time.

    I'm so glad they preserved this. I'm going to have to do some digging next time I'm up in Fairbanks and see what else the university might have stashed of him and other people that pioneered so much up in the interior.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    You just gotta love reading this stuff.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Just incredible reading. There is no duplicate for the real stuff. Thank you so much for sharing that, +1. Please, more, anytime.

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    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
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    Fascinating read, thanks for sharing! I've read Alaska's Wolf Man about Frank Glaser three times, once aloud to my wife and kids. The early Alaskan pioneers had some pretty incredible lives.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

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    Member highestview's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKsoldier View Post
    Fascinating read, thanks for sharing! I've read Alaska's Wolf Man about Frank Glaser three times, once aloud to my wife and kids. The early Alaskan pioneers had some pretty incredible lives.
    I didn't know that uncle Chuck was mentored by Frank Glasier. I certainly have got to get that book and read it now. I'm sure Chuck has a lot more stuff either written down or recorded. After working enforcement, guiding and working at the newspaper for decades, he certainly had the habit of taking meticulous, detailed records of anything that could be of use later.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by highestview View Post
    He got licensed as a guide in 1951, in the Territory of Alaska, and guided from then until 1994, flying his own super cub most of the time.
    Wow.......I can only imagine what an incredible ride that was. On second thought, I bet I can't EVEN imagine...!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by highestview View Post
    I certainly have got to get that book and read it now.
    Oh yes, be sure to....you'll love it. My all time favorite so far....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by highestview View Post
    I didn't know that uncle Chuck was mentored by Frank Glasier. I certainly have got to get that book and read it now. .
    The book is easy to find locally, but if you want I'd be happy to loan you my copy. Just let me know. It would be worth it to me just to chat a bit with the nephew of an Alaskan legend.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

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