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Thread: What Is The Process Of Buying A Gun Out Of State?

  1. #1
    Member Sharpshooterassassin's Avatar
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    Default What Is The Process Of Buying A Gun Out Of State?

    What is the process of buying a firearm out of state? This may be a noob question but I've always bought my firearms in Alaska. Also, if I was to buy a gun from a private owner out of state, what's to say that he won't keep my money and NOT ship the gun to an FFL up here?

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    Member Sharpshooterassassin's Avatar
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    Like for example Privatley off of "Arms List".

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    You give him the address of the FFL you want it sent to and your FFL sends a copy of his info to the FFL that the is doing the transfer. Also, if the person does not send you the gun, he gets in a lot of trouble when you call the ATF, FBI, cop or who else you want to call. IIRC, it becomes a federal crime because it is across state lines.

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    I "think" your FFL CAN accept a firearm from a non-FFL but some (most?) won't; mine won't. All the transactions I've been involved with went FFL to FFL and all those were from dealers.

    There is a huge trust factor when dealing with private parties. Most gunning people are great people and want both parties to be happy with a deal. We all hear horror stories where things went bad. Communication is key to having a good deal.

    At some time I need to sell off some of my things and will put them up for sale to a larger market. I want the buyer to be happy with the transaction, but I'm going to have the money in my bank before I ship! Being happy shouldn't be a problem with like new items, but it bothers me how to correctly describe a used item. Really it was used for hunting and it's 70+ years old...it's not LNIB! I've seen things called excellent with rust and scratches showing. I've bought other items from guys described as used that seem new in the box. Never know.

    Good luck.

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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Yes an FFL can take in a gun from a non FFL, I do it all the time but I want a copy of the senders ID to get the info for my book and file away if the gun isnít going back where it came from.
     
    For handguns the best to have an FFL ship it because it can go FFL to FFL in a cheap USPS flat rate box. Gunbroker.com has a good list of FFLs with their fees in the buyers tools tab, that is the best way to find a reasonable shipping price.
     
    There are seldom problems buying guns online, by and large gun people tend to be honest people but stuff does go bad sometimes. You can tell more by the level of communication than anything, you will just get a feeling as you converse and itís best to trust your feeling. If it makes you feel better have the seller drop the gun at his FFL to hold before you pay then his FFL ships after you pay, helps protect everyone.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

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    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    Like Andy says, most transactions go very well. Check and read the feedback on your seller. Look at the photos and read the description CAREFULLY. Most sellers will accurately describe any flaws in an item they are selling, but in the end, it is up to you to ASK QUESTIONS. Most sellers will answer honestly, but will generally not provide info that is not asked for. If the seller is not responsive, or the deal is "too good to be true", move on to the next deal. Fuzzy photos and poor descriptions make me go to a different seller. I've worked both ends, and sometimes the buyer is the "problem".
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    Member Sharpshooterassassin's Avatar
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    I think I'll just stick to buying firearms in state unless I buy from a reputable dealer out of state. I don't want to take the risk of getting screwed if I try and buy a firearm from someone Privatley out of state. Thanks for the input.

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