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Thread: how long is your line??

  1. #1
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    Default how long is your line??

    i was wondering how long a trap line your guys run?
    and how many traps you set out an average?
    this will be my first year trapping and trying to get an idea of how much gear i need, how far apart to set traps and snares?
    any info would be great.
    thanks

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    Every bit of country is different so the answers you get will probably vary widely. It depends on target species and populations. I run 2 lines 1 is approximatley 120 miles the other is around 45 that is round trip from the house on my snowmachine. On the longer line I have over 2 dozen otter sets in the first 20 miles but no marten sets on the upper 20 miles I have a couple dozen marten sets so using our answers to determine what you need is not very practical. You will need ot get out there and see what types of animals are available for you and how much and make some determinations on your own. Once you know what types of fur bearers are there then you can decide what types of traps and how many you need in the meantime prepare for what you believe is there and the length you plan to make your line
    meats meat don't knock it till you try it

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    well the senerio is i am gonna be at remote location and just trying to get an idea on where to start as in how much gear , this ia not a spot i can just drive up to everyday. .. i figured its gonna be a trial and error situation , just trying to get a head of the game as much as i can..
    and i think getting as much information from whom ever wants to share is practical. for the fact if i already knew this info or opinions i would not be asking. the more info and peoples opinion i can get the better idea i can have into gearing up and being some what prepaired if only just a little.
    would suck to go all the way out there and not have enough traps or snares, or spend all seasion in a short line when i could have gone longer.
    so i do thank you for your input..

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    Can you provide some more info? With a little more information folks may be able to provide some helpful advice/thoughts. Are you experienced in remote alaska winter travel and living? What area of the state is this remote location (don't need GPS coordinates from you but just give us an idea of where you'll be)? How will you be accessing the area and how hard is access? What is the terrain and vegetation like there? Lots of snow or not much? Coastal or interior? Up in the mountains or down low in the flats? Does the area have high or low numbers of moose or caribou? Do you already have trails to use for trapping or will you be blazing out new ones? Who owns the land (ie. state, federal, native corp etc)? Are you aware of any other trappers or folks that own property or live in nearby or adjacent areas? One good place to start would be to get in touch with whoever the fish and game wildlife biologist is for that area. Many are trappers or at least very familiar with trapping and what is going on in their respective areas. They'd also likely know if there are other trappers that may trapping in that area as well. Another possible source of good information would be air charters and hunting guides that work in that area. They may be able to provide some very good info about numbers of animals in certain areas where you may be trapping and also potential access routes. Do you have a cabin to work out of or will you be commuting or camping out of a tent? Any villages or towns nearby?

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    bairdi is right for us to help you effectively we need more info and that was what I was getting at. I was in no way trying to be unhelpful. Alaska is so diverse in the type of country you will find. An idea of where you will be would be helpfull. I have seen several guys over the years go out to watch various lodges around here thinking they would have the country all to themselves only to find they were right dab smack in the middle of an established line. More info on where you will be might have someone on here say that is right along my line.
    If you have a lot of timber you are most likely going to have marten if you have a lot of open tundra you are not. Not sure where you currently trap or live but it is kinda like trying to compare lines between the farm country of Iowa and the western Rockies and that is why to best help you we need more info
    meats meat don't knock it till you try it

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    So your going to trap and need some education, right? The length of our lines, and the number of traps we use may, or may not help you. Like Otter said, the type of country you will be in is important.
    Also, what do you have to transportation? Dogs, your 2 legs, snogo?
    What furbearer species will you be targeting? Marten require different traps than lynx, which is different than fox, to some extent. Wolves are even more different.
    Additionally.............how much money you have to spend?
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    ok dont have alot of money . Lot is north of traper lake. Will be walking the line unless i get a good seal on a sled. Not shure what furs will be out there but there is plenty of water own some land and will build a cabin just dont wanna over do it or under do it as well

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    well...at least we didn't run him off...lol

    That area is tough without a sled to trap..tough walking and unless you can find a ridgline or wooded area and stay with it..pretty much marshland...

    Going to be tough but doable for a few different species...
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    Thanks for the reply. Since you are walking, weight becomes an issue and since you mentioned money was limited, you should look into getting some snares for fox, coyotes, and lynx. There is a bit of a steep learning curve to snaring, but once you get the hang of it I think you probably get more bang for the buck than with traps. Martentrapper on here put up a nice tutorial on here on snaring foxes some time ago. You should try to find it. I'm not super familiar with the area around Trapper Lake, but I'd guess there are a variety of critters available. Maybe someone with more experience in that area will chime in and provide more info. For marten, since you are walking, you might think about using #0 or #1 longsprings on leaning poles. By using longsprings you don't need to carry extra traps as any marten you catch can be removed from the trap at the set vs. having to bring most marten caught in a body gripper back to someplace warm to remove as they are often frozen to the trap. You also mentioned that there is alot of water around where you think you'll be trapping. If there is water, there is likely beaver, otter, mink and muskrats available. If you know where the beaver lodges and food caches are beaver can be caught in snares set under the ice. A good all around beaver, fox and lynx snare is the Northern Fox and Beaver Snare that is made by the Snare Shop (approx. $20 for a dozen snares). The 1/16" cable they use is usually too light for coyotes though. I've had a couple of coyotes chew out of 1/16" cable when they've accidentally blundered into cat or fox sets.

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    Like baradi says learn to use snares and smaller traps for what you have the one exception you may run into is otter though they can be taken with footholds & snares if it is done on top of the snow and ice you can see a lot of singe not always but on occasion, so you may want to haul in some 220 conis they are as small as you would want to go with otter if there are in in the area.
    If you have wolverines in the area you can set snares for them off the ground on leaning poles and avoid buying the more expensive traps required to hold them. I wouldn't recommend intentionally snaring them on the ground they roll and twist and fight probably harder than any critter out there and can make short work of even 1/8 cable if there feet are on the ground.
    One trick I use to do a lot when walking extensive lines was to carry some good skinning knives one or two should do the trick skinning as you go or stopping and skinning in a given spot to lighten the load and add bait to a bait pile that you have snared up for canines can save your back especially if trapping any beaver or anything much bigger than mink or marten for that matter. Being it is marshy I am thinking possibly mink and rats those #1 & #0 long springs will do well for them as well as the marten. The nice thing about the long spring is you can find them fairly cheap for someone that doesn't have a lot of money to put out for them. Do not pass up any cheap jumps of the same size they are a tad bit lighter than the long spring but generally a bit more expensive. As for the number of traps or sets to expect honestly that is something that going into a new line I have always gone over prepared for without seeing the country during the season and spending some time out there it is almost impossible to tell. Just use your best educated guess by what you have seen so far and then add a little extra just in case . After all a guy can really never have too many traps
    meats meat don't knock it till you try it

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    no not scared away. Just no internet at the cabin im at so i get on line when i go to town one or twice a week i have be collecting snares. I learned how to build them so i have some 1/16 5/ 32 and 1/8 . i am hoping to have a snowmobile befor winter but if not i have a pull sled to help with the load. My land out ther has lots of trees and there is plenty of woods between the marsh also. I will be looking for used 220 coni and see what i can find. thanks for all the info. Helps alot with me tring to get prepaired. If there anything else i need to know please dont hold back lol

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    Can you access the land year round? If so you could start cutting trails or exploring places to trap now and by late fall have all the traps in place just not set. That and places picked for bait piles for snare sets saves a lot of time and back ache when one doesn't have to try and do it all in a day. It is nice to pull up to a place you want to set and all you have to do is walk up open the trap and place bait and walk away
    meats meat don't knock it till you try it

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    im trying to get out there this summer to start on the cabin , but hard finding a float plane that will land on a small lake. but thats a good idea, on scoping out the place in the summer, will try to do that,

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    well hello again everyone, was not able to make it out to my land to build my cabin, instead i bought land here in soldotna, so will be hoping to do a little trapping here this winter ,, or at least i can help some one out so i can learn the ropes, if any one needs help or wouldend mind showing someone the ropes let me know...

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    Now you're in a whole different ballgame (road system competition). Try contacting the Kenai chapter of the Alaska Trappers Association for guidance. Good luck with your season!

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