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Thread: Time to fly

  1. #1
    Member gusuk1's Avatar
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    Default Time to fly

    first off,have not been behind the stick/yoke on my own,but have been flown all over kingdom com and stuffed in to many cubs.have and still kinda have the fear of heights.stems for a couple bad falls.semi retired crab fishermen,now guide lodge owner,due to the high rates of flying in and out of the village i need to get my own plane.i feel i can do this but still a bit ifie,what i would like to know is a couple things-i see the cub a super plane but the stick kinda spooks me,i like the taylor craft yoke /handle,will a guy get over that once he starts flying the cub?as for a first kinda bush plane what do you guys suggest and where to look for one that is air worthy and not so high priced in ALASKA?i am serious in buying some thing by mid summer.would only be used as personal transportation for now.would i be better off in waiting after summer for better prices?will be heading out the door in the morning for another ten day hunt.thanks in advance for any comments and hope to join the group of AK fliers.

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    Moderator Adison's Avatar
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    Default Starting Off

    Well one thing you should know is that flying and being in control of your own airplane sort of cancels out the fear of heights and falling. At least it does for me. Kind of like driving a boat takes away my fear of drowning. Primary training will most likely use a yoke, but once you get the feel of a stick and the control it brings, you won't want to go back to a yoke again.

    Your choise of a plane will be a personal one. If it is for personal transportation, then fly whatever you feel comfortable in and will suite your needs best. Are you flying off of an improved strip? Paved? or Gravel? Do you need speed to get there and back in a few hours or is low and slow more your thing? Lots of variables and lots of planes to fill the bill. Prices wil vary according to your wants and avaliability. Welcome to the skies!
    Adison

  3. #3
    Member gusuk1's Avatar
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    Default understand was kina vage

    Adison,thanks for the repley,kinda in same cock pit in different fields,never had the fear of drowning although i should of few times when chaseing crabs,anyway back to starting to fly-would it be wise to just start off on a cub?have a few buddies that would train me.looking to fly into town and back to grub up-30 miles,now costs me 300 one way.seems i could pay for for costs in what it is costing me now.still looking for advise on what to use a a starter and best time to buy.

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    Member gusuk1's Avatar
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    Default gravel strip

    PS i have both a 1900 and a 1400 ft gravel strip in which i maintain,gets soft during break up,cubs can do fine on the big wheels,kinda of looking for cheaper way of getting in and out,but want to make sure i can do both and seeking a general price on a plane for my needs.

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    Default

    What plane? It depends. Strip length, anticipated load, typical flying conditions (windy?), desired airspeed. A Cub, a Scout, a Cherokee, a 172...they're all good planes. Buy the best airplane available that suits your mission. I'd rather have a good 172 than a marginal Cub, and vice versa.

    Stick or yoke? They're just tools to control the airplane. You'll get used to whatever you have.

    A 1400' strip is plenty for any of the models I mentioned, and a lot of models I didn't mention.

  6. #6
    Member gusuk1's Avatar
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    Default answering some ?'s

    Mr.pid,thanks for the come back,i have few different ways to go on this as a start up,i have been in a number of 172's and see the pay load diff,as a guide i am looking for some thing that i can train myself in for furture tundra landings,so i what i am getting at at is-small plane -speed is not a biggie,but bush landing is.seeing that stick or yok does not really matter.now price wise and when to buy is where i am at.if it is cheaper to get a 172 and train on the gravel strip and then go to a cub would this give a guy more of a feel for the land or should one just go for the cub and learn it?

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    Default

    My best answer is to ask your pilot friends that live the same lifestyle what they think. Or your favorite air taxi pilot that's familiar with your area and your strips. I have my opinions but they're centered around my own life.

    Cost to own and train? That's why I said to get the best plane you can. You want a flyer, not a maintenance project. That issue is more specific to an individual airplane than to a certain model. The only easy answer to the cost question is if you intend to insure, a 172 will be the cheapest plane to own, guaranteed.

    The most important thing is to start with good instruction and learn to exercise good judgement. The pilot is more important than the plane. For example, I'd rather be a passenger of a good pilot in a 172 than a bad pilot in a Cub, even into a small strip.

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    Default Devils Advocate

    Will you really save money by owning your own airplane?

    I've been flying a few years now... own a PA12.... couldn't think of a better way to spend my money/time. But it would be much cheaper and a person would save days (weeks) of time in upkeep/maintenance if they chartered.

    If you intend to fly clients in your aircraft there is also insurance. Insurance could run on the low side of 2k on up to whatever you want to spend.

    In the field you must babysit/worry about your own aircraft. On the other hand when the aircraft that you chartered leaves you behind there is nothing to worry about.

    If flown primarily in the bush you probably want something that runs on auto fuel.

    Those are the big down sides as I see them. But it's all worth it if you are aware of it going in.

    To pick an airplane decide what you want to be able to do with it in the long run. Identify the airplanes that will fulfill those needs. Then decide what you can afford. If you are buying used aircraft don't get in a hurry. It may take a year+ to find the right one for you.


    JB

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    Member gusuk1's Avatar
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    Default quick thanks and---

    almost done with my hunt and have 3 seconds to respond and ask.first yes jb i have in vision whether or not to take pss/clint. but for start up will be me only.as i have two min. home wheelling and dealing and stateing its time to fly,have an offer that i think i can't refuse,a fishing guide that works for a big comp,that has done some buss with me,is willing to sell me and train me in a saritogo(crabb fisherman spelling)he's willing to teach me to fly it and sell for 30k to me its a dream come true.what ?'s do i need to ask about the plane?and can you guys tell me about the sari vs the cub thanks again in advace and hope to be a part of this thread to come.

  10. #10
    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Default

    Without looking, I'd say a 30 grand saratoga is cheap and maybe not in good shape. Saratoga is a 6 seater piper cherokee, nose wheel, somewhat fast cruise speed. Not the best plane for gravel but useable, but really not good for a soft runway.
    The only similiarity between a saratoga and a cub is that they are both airplanes.
    What engine is in the saratoga? Does it have to have avgas? I agree with the previous poster who said get a plane that uses car gas. Noticeably cheaper.The saratoga would be great for hauling groc. It would carry quite a load. Operating costs on the saratoga would be higher than on a cub/citabria type of plane.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

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    Default Grizzly 1

    Quote Originally Posted by gusuk1 View Post
    almost done with my hunt and have 3 seconds to respond and ask.first yes jb i have in vision whether or not to take pss/clint. but for start up will be me only.as i have two min. home wheelling and dealing and stateing its time to fly,have an offer that i think i can't refuse,a fishing guide that works for a big comp,that has done some buss with me,is willing to sell me and train me in a saritogo(crabb fisherman spelling)he's willing to teach me to fly it and sell for 30k to me its a dream come true.what ?'s do i need to ask about the plane?and can you guys tell me about the sari vs the cub thanks again in advace and hope to be a part of this thread to come.

    Guess I have to disagree a little with some of these responses. I'd think a Citabria (maybe a Scout) would be a good starting airplane. It'll handle your strip, and is a reasonably good airplane all round. It's roomy and more comfortable than a Super Cub. Flies just a bit faster, too.

    It's not TOO costly to operate, but you'd best figure in a dab for those little dings and bruises that you'll no doubt pick up from gravel, brush and other items (the prop, horizontal stabilizers, etc).

    Unlike a bunch of you guys, I'm horizontally opposed to auto fuel in an airplane, in spite of the approvals. Avgas just seems to keep them cleaner.

    Don't be afraid of a "stick" airplane. You'll get used to it in the first hour. And, as for the C-172, I (personally!) don't think a nose wheel has any place in the bush. Which would set the Cherokee aside from my own list of desirable airplanes.

    And finally ------------ if I were thinking of something llike a Taylorcraft, I'd jump first for a 65-hp Aeronca Champ. Roomier and with MUCH better visibility.

    Personal opinions, but I hope they help.

    Mort Mason

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    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzly 1 View Post
    Guess I have to disagree a little with some of these responses. I'd think a Citabria (maybe a Scout) would be a good starting airplane. It'll handle your strip, and is a reasonably good airplane all round. It's roomy and more comfortable than a Super Cub. Flies just a bit faster, too.

    It's not TOO costly to operate, but you'd best figure in a dab for those little dings and bruises that you'll no doubt pick up from gravel, brush and other items (the prop, horizontal stabilizers, etc).
    Well now that someone else has recommended it................I just happen to have a Citabria 7GCBC for sale.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

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