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Thread: staining question

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    Default staining question

    would it be best to stain exterior wood siding before they go on cabin or can i stain them on cabin. Wondering if i had to stain both sides of my rough cut cedar? And i heard of shinking, i have rough pine going inside for my walls and ceiling. Any thoughts of this kind of method/tips. thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by mooselegs72 View Post
    would it be best to stain exterior wood siding before they go on cabin or can i stain them on cabin. Wondering if i had to stain both sides of my rough cut cedar? And i heard of shinking, i have rough pine going inside for my walls and ceiling. Any thoughts of this kind of method/tips. thanks
    My recommendation would be to use only OLYMPIC "penetrating" stain, not any of that porch and deck stain stuff, which is really more of a paint and stays pretty much on the surface of the wood. It's too heavy bodied to penetrate much. Staining both sides may not be worth the extra cost, since you'll be using twice as much stain. It will be both easier and faster to stain the siding in place on the walls. Shrinkinig won't be much of a problem if the cedar is well dried already. My two cents worth, of course.

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    The case for prefinishing is you can do it in a controlled environment, and only have to set up ladders, scaffolding, etc. once, for installation. Probably don't need to stain the back sides; for paint you should, but not stain. Any pine used for interior work should be VERY well dried, around 7% MC if possible, certainly no more than 10, or it will shrink badly.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Member Akheloce's Avatar
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    If staining while the cedar is horizontal, you will use more stain.
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    In a successful effort to prevent cupping on wide beveled siding, we use to use a dip trough to seal the cedar or spruce siding.
    The trough was made of 2x material and had a leak-proof lining, set on saw horses. Above the dip trough there were vertical 2x4s with timber lock screws partially screwed in for setting dipped boards on. As one board soaked the previously dipped board, dripping off on the rack, would be squeegeed off-front and back (product run back into trough) and carried over to drying racks. These drying racks were made again from 2x and screws and would hold enough product to last for several days. This was with oil based penetrating product. The system worked well and there was very little wasted exterior sealer or siding. Beats climbing a ladder to paint too.

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