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Thread: Grinding out the final details

  1. #1

    Default Grinding out the final details

    Quick question on grinding meat. I realize this should go in the meat care forum, but I figured I'd get a faster response here.

    We are butchering tomorrow, and I have a nice cased over layer on all the meat. For the scrap meat, should that just go straight in the grinder, or trim the outer layer of it off?

  2. #2
    Member pacific-23's Avatar
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    For me it depends on the color and the smell. I only add venison fat to my burger (unless making sausage were pork is added), and my criteria is good clean smelling pink fat. I'm not sure if fat is what you're calling the "cased over layer" If you mean cased from contact with air, then my answer is still the same - if it looks and smells good, it is good!

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    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    For me it depends if I want completely lean meat or not. I prefer as lean as I can get and trim it off.

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    Member Sterlingmike's Avatar
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    Straight to the grinder. You'll never know where the stiff stuff went. I always double grind and I add some cheap cut of pork to the meat. About 10%. A good boneless pork roast cut into small pieces and added in the first grind, then grind them all again. Still VERY lean, but with a little extra taste.

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    Member mtncowboy's Avatar
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    I cut the cased over layer off then grind. Just a personal preference, but I also do not add anything to it either.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Jerod... i trim the dried meat off.. if you need some tips or help let me know.. rather busy this weekend, but can take a few moments.. also keep in mind i have hobart mixer, and sausage stuffers sitting on the shelf.. as well a #32 grinder that will do 740 lbs an hour... also have some FAB! sausage receipies...
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    I trim it off too. Just a personal thing

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    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Trim it and get the best product you can.. We always add 10% fat to it from the grocery
    Semper Fi and God Bless

  9. #9
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    I always use the fillet knife to take a thin layer off from the crust. But if you kill a bull and process it right away (like many seem to do these days) before it forms a crust, if it's real clean then no reason really not to grind it up with the rest.

    One time I was over at a native friend of mine. I had killed a bull earlier and was calling around looking for some suet. She asked if there was any particular reason I wanted suet in the burger? You see they had always used suet for their burger as well, but after she had gone through a bout with cancer, she had gotten a bit more health conscience. Another friend mentioned to her about using olive oil instead, so she related that to me. Since then we've never used suet again. Just a bit of the oil mixed in with a burger holds it together nicely and gives a bit of flavor. Works great, and isso much more healthy. Olive oil is extremely good for you.

    Of course if you want the suet mainly for the flavor then go for it. But, I have to admit that I always struggled a bit about putting something unhealthy into such lean quality meat. Really glad I don't do it anymore....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member dieNqvrs's Avatar
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    You have to ask yourself, would you cut the crust off and simply cook it up that way and eat it? If yes then grind, if no then don't grind and use as animal treats. We always trim all ligaments and seams out of the trim/ burger meat as well. If you don't like the way it is whole, it won't make it any better ground IMO.

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    I guess this never comes up for me because I always trim the entire quarter of crust before deboning. If you are referring to the goody bag with the extra chunks you pulled off the neck, backbone etc. then yes I trim anything I would not put in my mouth before grinding, this does not mean every facet of every piece (many of them do not skin over due to being stuck next to each other) but once I'm to the whittling part of a butcher job in the field I'm probably not as particular as I will be in my warm kitchen with a sharp knife so I usually intend to inspect and trim my goody bag pieces.

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    We usally hang our game about 10-14 days, at which point there is a good hard crust and possibility some mold. The outer layer gets removed and goes into a seperate container and not in our meat to be ground. The trimings then go to mushers that use it for their dogs. All other meat goes in the tubs to be ground. With moose we might add a 'little' suet but not much. With bison we do not add anything as there is enough fat to suit our needs.

  13. #13

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    We removed it all. I was mainly referring to the scrap for grinding into burger. We have been processing our meat right away the last few years, so it's been a while since we've let anything crust over. Nice load for the grinder that we'll be doing tomorrow night, and those bison sure do offer some real nice roasts! We've got our systems down for processing, but I do appreciate all the help and tips. I like the olive oil idea. We don't add anything to our burger, but we might try this at some point.

  14. #14

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    If it's clean but just a little dry just grind it. I usually add about 8% beef fat to help hold the burger together but, if you don't want to add any fat you can add a little milk just before you make it into patties, the milk will help bind it.

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    Member 8x57 Mauser's Avatar
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    Clean crust grinds up fine - we don't even notice dryness. The flavor is good. Sometimes we've aged in a smoke shed to keep flies at bay. Didn't even notice the smoke flavor.

    If the crust is moldy or dirty, it's out.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8x57 Mauser View Post
    Clean crust grinds up fine - we don't even notice dryness. The flavor is good. Sometimes we've aged in a smoke shed to keep flies at bay. Didn't even notice the smoke flavor.

    If the crust is moldy or dirty, it's out.
    ^what he said.^

    That bit of dried skin is no different than jerky; it's just dried meat. If it's clean, grind it; it'll rehydrate in the mix. No added fat for me, especially from grocery store feed lot beef. If making sausage, I like some good organic pork shoulder ground in.
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    Member AKdutch's Avatar
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    I'm very interested in the use of olive oil, never heard that before. I always bothers me to have the finest organic meat you can get and add processed beef fat into it. How much olive oil do you add per pound of meat?

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    I slice it thin and then into strips, salt and pepper then hang Ina breezy place ........a meat rack, or inside on strings with a fan blowing them very dry, great stuff!! It's already 1/2 done, so why not?

    Still, glad ya don't toss it!
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  19. #19

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    I grind any and all clean meat, moist or dry and add NO fat til cooking. Fat spoils and becomes rancid long before muscle tissue so the last thing I want is spoiled burger from a less than ice cold cooler for an outing. Sausage is another story completely because of the salt/preservatives added to the meat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKdutch View Post
    I'm very interested in the use of olive oil, never heard that before. I always bothers me to have the finest organic meat you can get and add processed beef fat into it. How much olive oil do you add per pound of meat?
    I put my Oil(mostly Olive,sometimes Vegetable) in the tray and kinda mix it in as I go, swiping most pieces through it right before they go down the Chute. I just ground a caribou and bet I did not use more than 3 cups of oil.

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