Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 47

Thread: 2 sheep hunters one rifle

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,417

    Question 2 sheep hunters one rifle

    Last year while my partner and I were humping 2 sheep out of the Brooks to the Haul Road and making 2 trips, we got to thinking about this and figuring out how to cut redundant gear where we could.


    I seem to remember reading about guys doing it. I think there was a hunt posted here a few years ago where 3 guys flew in to the Brooks. 2 hunters, one non-res along for the ride and 1 rifle. I think they scored 1 ram, could'nt quite connect on another.


    Anyone ever done it? Pro's-Cons?
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,391

    Default

    There was a husband-wife combo that did this last year and, if I recall, took two rams with this approach. Personally, I just hate the thought of such an approach messing up our hunt if things went wrong. But...I only take one rifle when I'm hunting solo, so I suppose one could argue it's not much different.

  3. #3

    Default

    I think one rifle and one bow would make a much better combination. I have a friend tagging along with me on my Delta sheep hunt this August, and I'll have him tote the rifle and I'll carry my bow. There will be a registration bou hunt at the same time, so if we are lucky enough on the sheep, we can spend a couple of days trying to get him a bou.

  4. #4
    Member bushrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Now residing in Fairbanks from the bush
    Posts
    4,363

    Default

    Perry, my take, one practices and becomes proficient with a certain rifle (or bow <grin>). Everything about it is unique to him/her. The way the stock fits against your cheek, the distance between eye and scope, time at the range with it etc. Yeah, anyone can put a rifle to cheek and look through the scope and shoot where the crosshairs are...but man if the two of you haven't spent time with the same rifle and become one with it, 7 or 8 pounds of redundancy seems a small price to pay. That's the bottom line really, you'd both have to spend time with the same rifle. Only other factor is, of course, backup. Hunters fall. They may tweak a scope. There are bears out there <grin>. Maybe you shoot and wound a sheep but your partner is there looking through his/her scope and can follow up and prevent losing it. A certain level of redundancy in the Alaska bush isn't necessarily a bad thing.


  5. #5

    Default

    I did it last year one a sheep hunt and had no worries about it. A lot of things can fail on a backpack hunt. I've had tents, pads, rain gear, stoves, binos fog up...and some more failures I'm sure, but never a rifle. IMO a rifle is one of the more robust things we hunters are taking into the field. I'll be doing it again this year. Flying in two rifles but leaving one at the strip...kinda cheating but still. Last year we did a buddy and I did a walk in off the road. Took his rifle, he took a sheep and I was next shooter. I had no problems with this approach, saves an honest 7 pounds overall. Yes I realize if a rifle fails the hunt is over. I generally don't split up during the day from my hunting partners on a sheep hunt, what few I've been on, but I know some do and for that reason its not an option for most. I realize many have had rifles fail, scopes knocked off zero and what not. But many other things can play a big part in your hunt as well. Heck some guides dont' bring back up rifles along on sheep hunts either.

    I think some would never consider it and others swear by it like so many other topics.

  6. #6
    Member OHTroy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    88

    Default

    I have a friend that uses this approach for every sheep hunt 2 guys 1 rifle. It has worked well for him on multiple occasions. I thought I would try it on a alpine country spring bear hunt with 4 guys and 2 rifles. We had hunted for 3 days and only saw one black bear that did not give us a good shot. On the trip out still in the high country a lone black bear was spotted going over the hill in front of us. The two with guns dropped packs and pursued. While waiting for them to connect/return for packs. A Brown bear and 2 very large cubs dropped over the hill on me and the other unarmed person. The bears saw/smelled us about the same time we saw them and turned on a dime and went back the same way they came. I decided then that a 7 pound rifle in my pack was better than a 7 pound mess in my shorts.

  7. #7
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,055

    Default

    If I hunted sheep pretty routinely with the same partner I'd probably think it was a decent idea- certainly would chop 7 pounds and change to pack around. Both partners spending some range time with the one rifle isn't a bad idea either.

    I've taken several folks hunting who didn't even own a rifle and when the time came to shoot they just used mine... not exactly a weight saving strategy on my part, but it certainly could be.

    I've broken a scope in the field during a fall- off course, I broke myself in the same process so continuing the hunt wasn't on my mind.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  8. #8
    Member Yellowknife's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    803

    Default

    I know a guy that did this last year. Story is that the first shooter went ahead on a stalk of a legal ram and ended up spooking it... at which point it ran up the mountain and right by the second guy with no rifle.

    They did get a sheep eventually, but as I recall it's two rifles planned for the next trip.

    I'm going with the two hunters / two rifles approach primarily so we can split up on a stalk or possibly just hunt different drainage's. Depending on how the partners work together, I can certainly see going with just one though.

    Yk

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    62

    Default

    Have done it a couple times - one rifle, one bow, walking in in the brooks. Shot two rams the first year at about 300 yards. I shot, handed buddy the rifle, he shot. Pretty low drama.

    No rams the second year, but that was just because we couldn't get on a legal ram.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,919

    Default

    Keep in mind that sometimes there is more then one legal in a band of sheep and would suck if the others fled the scene after the first shot..If you take out the big one though first the others will probably hang long enough. Any guided sheep hunt I have done has most always been with just the hunters rifle... Mine get stashed at the drop

  11. #11

    Default

    It was standard in the old days. Some sheep hunter named Frank Cook and his partner Jay Muller only ever carried one rifle. I think that Frank Cook got a fine sheep one year. Lot of the old guides never carried a rifle while guiding sheep hunters, Moose Moore never did. Moose, Frank, and Jay all hung out at the Captian Cook Athletic Club.......That was back when it was owned by some Glacier Pilot.......went by name Bob Reeve. Every day I would ask Bob, "Whats happening".........Bob would say, "Dave....One day chicken....next day feathers". (God, but I loved ole Bob) I had to good luck to spend time with the man who guided Bob to that Monster Brown Bear.

  12. #12
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,748

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    Keep in mind that sometimes there is more then one legal in a band of sheep and would suck if the others fled the scene after the first shot..
    Or......both of you are in a position where there are two bands of sheep containing one legal ram in each band. Problem is, that the bands are on separate mountains. If you have two rifles you could split up and each go after the rams. But if you only have one gun, there could very well be no chance at going after both rams on separate mountains......

    No thanks......besides I feel a whole lot more comfortable always having a rifle with me.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  13. #13
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,417

    Default

    Good input guys. Like anything else, personal preference and it could be ok or go sideways. I think it depends a lot on the hunters, area, plan and hunt logistics and style.


    I was on a DCUA walkin sheep hunt with another friend and at the moment of truth his rifle would not chamber a round. An older Rem 700 BDL 338. I was next to him, handed him my Kimber and he shot the ram. On another hunt, my partner had wounded a ram, emptied his gun and did not have any extra ammo with him. It was in his pack. I polished off that ram. 2 guns were good to have.


    I hear you Mark about marksmanship with your weapon. We/he'd shoot it this summer.

    Firearm dependability. Personally, I'd have no problem going on a solo sheep hunt with only my Kimber. I have 100% confidence in the gun and scope. I know that stuff can happen. I guess it'd be a calculated risk.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  14. #14

    Default

    Lot of those old guys only took one sleeping bag or they took two elephants foots.

  15. #15
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,748

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snyd View Post

    I know that stuff can happen. I guess it'd be a calculated risk.
    Yeah....that's the biggest thing right there........do you want to risk it? Climbing around on rocks all day is a REAL easy way to knock off, or break a scope. I'm always quite surprised that my scope has stayed zeroed after the abuse I've put it through....... Well maybe I shouldn't say that....one time for some reason I couldn't hit the broad side of a barn if my life depended on it........lol.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    738

    Default

    Interesting thread. If it works out to carry one rifle and tag two rams than yes, one could be smug with their decision. However as others
    have pointed out, a lot can go wrong - are you willing to blow a years worth of planning, money, getting sheep shape for one fluke incident?
    Being able to stash a rifle at a strip at least gives you an option, even though its extra work.

    If someone goes with the idea of one rifle, than I'd get it set up to have a "quick detach" mount system whereby a spare scope could be put on, pre-zeroed. A shot to verify zero (you should have checked it out at a local range) and you are good to go. I think we'd agree that it would be the
    scope going haywire before the rifle.

    If I recall, there was a sheep hunting husband/wife team that was successful with a least one ram. However on their hike out, they had a
    pretty close DLP situation with a bear. If someone finds that story, I believe they were going to modify their plan (pistol?) next time.

    Think spring up there!

  17. #17
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    2,443

    Default

    Personally, I wouldn't do it, if we were BOTH hunting. I do not like using someone else's rifle nor do I want to shoot my animal with someone else's. A rifle is special to me and will carry my own even though its added extra weight. There's too many variables as to why. I have no problem with my buddy using my rifle, if his was to jam or go wrong to take an animal. Also, carrying one rifle, if we were to separate for some reason....I want the rifle for sure. and I'm sure he would too..... I could post more cons than pros.
    Now If I was to accompany someone like a family member, where he or she is only one hunting then I'm fine with one rifle. and hopefully a reliable one. In this situation, we are to be together at all times, so rifle is there to protect both people if needed.

  18. #18

    Default

    I have done it on 3 sheep hunts and 3 goat hunts with great success and I think it is the only way to go. In fact, we are fully convinced by this method However, like most things with mountain hunting preparation is key. Both hunters must go to the range and spend time with the rifle and be comfortable with it. It makes for good communal gear sharing, one guy with the tent, stove and the other with the rifle. When it comes time to pull the trigger, you got one guy on the rifle and the other on the spotter\binos.

  19. #19
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,748

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by paulfair View Post
    I have done it on 3 sheep hunts and 3 goat hunts with great success and I think it is the only way to go.
    I'm sure it is..........until it's not.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  20. #20
    Member sheep man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    wasilla, gods country
    Posts
    527

    Default

    I find myself breaking away from my partner, I also find no issues packing a rifle..... Old school....
    I ♥ Big Sheep

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •