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Thread: Reloading-where to start?

  1. #1
    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Question Reloading-where to start?

    My buddy just "inherited" some reloading gear and were trying to figure out how to do it and where to get supplies. I'm sure this has been discussed before, but is there a go-to shop in Anchorage for reloading supplies & manuals?

    Tim

  2. #2
    Member Ripper's Avatar
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    Sportsmans warehouse has the best selection and prices on reloading components, but Great Northern Guns and Boondocks are good too.

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    Sportsmans Wh. will offer a selection of reloading manuals and I would suggest a thorough study of brass, primers, your press, setting up dies, specialty tools ie..caliper, deburring/chamfer tool, trimmer, funnels(s) etc.......

    brass and bullet selection would be beneficially cost effective if you were to go to Midway or Natchez or Huntingtons, Shooters Pro Shop.

    It is an exciting hobby/interest rolling your own. There is a strong warning that goes hand in hand in reloading-pay attention. Be safe and enjoy.

  4. #4
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Id get a book. You can have it right on the bench with you and be confident the information is from a competent source. The lee one is pretty good and clear. I havent looked at many others in quite awhile. I just started with the lee, got the basics down, then picked up info from the net or other reloaders I have met along the way.

    Mt View sports (ask for Dave) should be able to give you a good start. I have talked to employees at great northern and sportsmans, and wasnt super impressed with the knowledge they have.

    Reloading basics are very easy.

    1. Lube, Size and reprime cartridge with sizer die.
    2. Check that the case is within specs according to a reloading manual. trim it with a trimmer if not. chamfer the case.
    3 select powder and weight of powder according to load data and fill the case.
    4. Seat a bullet to correct depth.

    Its really that simple. All the tools you need like scale, priming tool come with instruction as to their use.

    ON that note, the most important things you need are
    Scale, powder thrower, calipers, deburing tool (get a good set), case lube, priming tool and a powder funnel. even if your press comes with a built in primer seater get the handheld anyway. Trimmer is pretty optional for basic handloading. Seldom are cases past trim length. However if reloading auto pistol rounds trim length is real important for propper feeding and headspace in the gun.
    anyway, hope I covered everything, I might have not. Get a book. And have fun. Oh and save lots of money, reloading uses it up fast!

  5. #5
    Member alaska bush man's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Reloading Manual

    Buy a Sierra Reloading Manual......gives step by step instructions.

    Sportsman Warehouse has them.
    Alaska

  6. #6

    Default Reloading

    Quote Originally Posted by tccak71 View Post
    My buddy just "inherited" some reloading gear and were trying to figure out how to do it and where to get supplies. I'm sure this has been discussed before, but is there a go-to shop in Anchorage for reloading supplies & manuals?

    Tim
    I stopped counting my reloads after 50,000. rounds. I highly recomend Dillon presses & carbide "new generation", 3 die sets. If any of his reloading tools break, he will replace it for free...and for life! I also recomend STARLINE brass. I have loaded ammo from range/plinking to very unique custom handgun ammo. Fell free to email me any time.

  7. #7
    Member Darreld Walton's Avatar
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    Default Research...

    When I was sixteen, I opened the big green box, pulled stuff out, set it up the way I thought it should look, and proceeded to have at it. The extra couple dollars for the manual was money I didn't have and it was therefore deemed unnecessary!
    In the front of the all the major bullet manufacturers' loading manuals are very specific instructions for setting up and using their equipment, as well as component inspection, preparation and assembly. Check with the shops around town and ask specific questions, and be honest about your skill level.
    Take an inventory of the parts that you have on hand, and compare it to what is basically needed to get started, you don't necessarily 'need' all the bells and whistles now, unless they were already part of the inheritance. Guess what I'm saying is that you don't need to throw cubic money at this to get going!
    Hope you enjoy!

  8. #8
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    I'm curious about the equipment, can you give a detailed list of stuff. It might be easier to see what you're missing.

    I would say this would be a good time to start a collection of loading manuals, they not only give good info to get started but are just a good read and very educational.

    You will need some knowledge of components before you buy "supplies" or you will likely waste lots of money.

    For instance; what powder and primers are needed to load 300 RUM, 44 Mag, and 8x57 Mauser?

    Clerks at the big stores rarely know enough to be of any help, some do but an inexparienced loader cannot separate the wheat from the chaff.

    Ask specific questions here, you could get good answers and if the answer is questionable it will be questioned.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  9. #9
    Member jrt34's Avatar
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    Default Murphy - Here's the list

    Geez fellas, thanks for all the info. It appears that the reloading community is well written and vocal. I'm the buddy who inherited the gear that originally started this particular thread.

    The list of items I recently aquired are:

    RCBS press with built in primer seater
    RCBS Uniflow Powder Measure
    RCBS scale
    RCBS Case Lube Kit
    Various RCBS Dies and Brass
    Various RCBS Shell Holders
    RCBS Burring Tool
    Various small pistol primers - CCI No. 500 (pretty old)

    And at a recent gun show I purchased a couple of very dated Sierra manuals and I've scraped some info off of the RCBS website. So far I've managed to clean, re-size, de-prime and bell the mouths of about 600 straight walled pistol cases. I'm getting ready to purchase a new manual (I think RCBS reccomends Spears??) and start actually rolling my own.

    Other then a set of calipers, does it look like I'm missing any mission critical gear? Any other thoughts or pieces of advice for a first-timer?

    Also, is it wise to try to use the old primers or should I toss them? Are there any special rules regarding disposing of primers in the trash??

    Thanks in advance for any advice.

    JRT

  10. #10
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    You have a pretty good set up. I'd say the dial caliper for sure, also I much prefer a separate priming tool from the press. The press mounted primer isn't as graceful as the individual primer tools and can get lube on the primer. I use and would suggest an RCBS bench mounted Auto-Primer. It comes with two primer tubes and punches for large and small primers and it uses the standard shell holders to fit which ever caliber you are loading. If you don't have much room on the bench maybe one of the hand priming tools would be better.

    You did not mention a primer flipper which is needed with the auto primer tubes to fill them easily and keeps greasy fingers off the primers. Also a bench block type of case holder to aid in the powder charging and to organize things a little better.

    As for the shelf life of the primers, they could easily last for twenty years or only a few months. Were they kept in a cool dry place? A humid warm invironment is harmful to primers. I wouldn't toss them but load a sample of them say fifty rounds and test fire them. If they work try a hundred. I don't know about trash rules. I suppose a large quantity of them would be noticed but it is very unlikely that anyone could be injured from them. They pop in the fire but do absolutely nothing. I wouldn't worry.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  11. #11

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    In your shoes I'd be happiest if I could spend a few hours with an experienced reloader, helping him on his setup and talking. Your own gear will make a whole lot more sense, and it will do wonders for your confidence to see it done firsthand.

  12. #12
    Member 8x57 Mauser's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jrt34 View Post
    The list of items I recently aquired are:

    RCBS press with built in primer seater
    RCBS Uniflow Powder Measure
    RCBS scale
    RCBS Case Lube Kit
    Various RCBS Dies and Brass
    Various RCBS Shell Holders
    RCBS Burring Tool
    Various small pistol primers - CCI No. 500 (pretty old)
    If you're starting with new brass, you're unlikely to need it yet, but at some point, the caliper you're buying will reveal that you either need a case trimmer or new brass. To get the most out of your reloading, I recommend the trimmer.

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