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Thread: Traditional archers

  1. #1
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    Default Traditional archers

    I recently ordered myself a recurve and plan on getting back into shooting. I want to network/ talk with other trad shooters up here and learn what I can about hints and tips of improving your shot and hunting tips/ stories and eventually fletching and arrow building.
    So PM me or reply to this and hopefully I can make some new friends/ acquaintances and learn from the older and wiser unique crowd that traditional shooters are. Thanks

  2. #2
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    What did you get?
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  3. #3

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    Welcome to the Forum and welcome to traditional archery. What bow did you order and when is it supposed to be delivered?

  4. #4

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    I am a traditional archer/bowhunter. I don't know if I have any words of wisdom but the two things I have learned over the years that help me in shooting traditional are

    #1. Practice, practice, and more practice

    #2. Pick a spot (this is in my opinion the greatest skill a traditional archer needs to learn that is the hardest to master)

    And when I say pick a spot I mean find the tiniest little speck on the target, whether it is a hair, fly, or whatever and hold your focus on that spot. I've found that if I can find and pick a definite spot, my shooting accuracy increases dramatically. When I am shooting over 25 yards, it is much harder to pick a spot and I think that is where most traditional archers get hung up.

    Good luck.

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    I ordered a PSE Coyote, 55# @ 28". My DL is 26". I ordered it after I learned about ILF. My preference is one piece recurves but it seems that take downs have improved greatly. I understand people haven't given them great reviews, but I'm sure it will be just fine compared to the cheap one I used to shoot several years ago.

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Seems like fine tackle to me; I wouldn't get too hung up on gear....it's important but not the most important thing. If you don't hit the mark in your mind first, you'll never hit it with an arrow.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  7. #7

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    look up traditional archers of alaska...they atleast at one time had a great group down your way. Also keep your ears open for the Massey shoot. Its our states biggest gagle of trad guys, also down your way.

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    That's how I feel about it. I see a lot of reviews saying that this bow or that bow is sooo accurate, but if I sucked at shooting it doesn't matter how accurate the bow is, in my opinion. The difference I would take I to accounts concerning trad bows is smoothness and how it fits in your hand..the rest is on the shooter. Just my 2cents :cheers:

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    The most accurate of trad bows will always be the longbow. Recurve bows have more flexible tips, the reason that Howard Hill, unquestionably the greatest archter/bowhunter ever, stated that he couldn't shoot one with any degree of accuracy. And while longbows have two drawbacks to most archers and bowhunters (they "stack up" and they best serve "instinctive" shooting), they are still the most acccurate under all field conditions. They can even be acccurately used from a prone position. Heavier longbows are not known for their "smoothness", but they remain the most accurate under field conditions. Moreover, they tend to handle heavier arrows better, which of course leads to better game penetration.

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    Bill's shop in Anchorage used to have a traditional night. Back Country Archery I think is the name it is on Arctic. I have stopped by there and shot a few times.

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    I talked to him and that's who I ordered my bow through. He had to move, due to road construction. He's now located @ 500 W Potter. I didn't see his range there but through our talk I don't think his range is anywhere close to his old one.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Riven370 View Post
    I ordered a PSE Coyote, 55# @ 28". My DL is 26". I ordered it after I learned about ILF. My preference is one piece recurves but it seems that take downs have improved greatly. I understand people haven't given them great reviews, but I'm sure it will be just fine compared to the cheap one I used to shoot several years ago.
    You did the most important thing right. You bought a reasonably priced bow at a low enough weight to learn how to use good form. This will help you get started much easier. I'm guessing your true draw weight at 26" will be about 48-49 pounds. Great weight to start with. Don't worry about takedown recurves. They've been around a long time. I'm not familiar with PSE recurve performance but I know my Black Widow takedown is one of the top performing recurves made. Accuracy will depend more on you than the bow. Good luck.

  13. #13
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    Check out Rick Snell with Snell's Silent Stalker. He doesn't have anything online but you can call him and talk to him about his bows. 1-479-331-0161
    One of the best, if not the best, traditional bow hunters of the age and the first person to take all the Alaskan big game animals. Did it with his own recurves and equipment.

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    Not sure if I want to get in a peeing match over which is better, recurve or longbow,but when I hear things like being good for instinctive shooting, and the only drawback is "stacking up", this gives me reason for concern.Stacking of a bow has been one of the leading reasons for establishing the bad habit of snap shooting(target panic).I hear all these stories about how"My friend is a snap shooter and he really kills them" In my over 50 years of shooting archery and hunting, I have yet to run into his friend.Take your new recurve and practice lots.You will find that your shooting ability and success will depent more on your being able to "focus" and concentrate on your shot, and as stated above.Pick a spot.Welcome to the Archery world.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rovingarcher View Post
    Not sure if I want to get in a peeing match over which is better, recurve or longbow,but when I hear things like being good for instinctive shooting, and the only drawback is "stacking up", this gives me reason for concern.Stacking of a bow has been one of the leading reasons for establishing the bad habit of snap shooting(target panic).I hear all these stories about how"My friend is a snap shooter and he really kills them" In my over 50 years of shooting archery and hunting, I have yet to run into his friend.Take your new recurve and practice lots.You will find that your shooting ability and success will depent more on your being able to "focus" and concentrate on your shot, and as stated above.Pick a spot.Welcome to the Archery world.
    There's a WORLD of difference betweeen "instinctive" shooting and "snap" shooting. I won the first Alaska state tournament (it was a York Round), heavy tackle division, with a 70-lb Hill longbow and home made wood arrows. I'm sure I never took more than 2-seconds for a release, and I assure you I wasn't "snap" shooting. That wouldn't work well at 70-yards, the longest range at which we were shooting.

    Mort Mason

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    Riven 330, If your not already a member, you might give some thought to the Alaskan Bowhunters.A great bunch of people who help fight for your seasons.Not to mention the fun banquets.

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