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Thread: Riverboats or canoes

  1. #1

    Default Riverboats or canoes

    Some of the larger canoes we have now are almost like these old riverboats. At what point does a large freighter canoe become a riverboat?

    This photo, taken by my Dad, is either on the Yukon or the Tanana River.
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  2. #2
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    Very cool picture. Thanks for sharing that.

    Some things never go out of style. Especially things that make such great sense as a large square stern canoe with a 4 stroke outboard that uses practically no gas, compared to any other style of boat. Doubly so when compared to just about anything else on the water.

    If it ain't broke...

  3. #3
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    martyv ... When was that picture taken?

    The Madboater, who works at the BoatShop in Fairbanks, showed me an old, but fully functioning, boat that was canoe shaped ... wider in middle to front, tapering to the stern, that was perhaps 50 years old ... had a homemade console in the center, with remote controls - steering, throttle and jackass lift - for the old 30+ hp motor. I believe the boat was over 30' in length. It was at the BoatShop to get prepped for hunting season. I went back the next day with a camera to get some pictures, but the owner had already picked it up. Long and not too wide, for easy travel in shallow water. Really a neat rig. If Madboater has any pics of that boat, perhaps he will post them.

    The Scott Hudson Bay, among others, is the modern descendent of the Voyager freighter or Montreal canoes of the Fur Trade era. It's been in production since 1965. It's a modern rendition of an old and practical tradition.

  4. #4

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    Well, I can say that I am fairly sure the two in the back are river boats......

  5. #5

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    That photo was taken in the early 60's. in Anvik I'm now informed.
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    Quote Originally Posted by anchskier View Post
    Well, I can say that I am fairly sure the two in the back are river boats......
    Can you see that larger one just behind the two you're getting a bit of drool on? ;-) Pretty sure you'd call that big bad boy a river boat too. Of course not as cool as a canoe.

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    they were long an slender cheeper to move in the water use less GAS per mile that is why I think
    SID

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by FamilyMan View Post
    Can you see that larger one just behind the two you're getting a bit of drool on? ;-) Pretty sure you'd call that big bad boy a river boat too. Of course not as cool as a canoe.
    Those two barges in the back were the ones I was referring to.... The rest all look to be what I would consider a "canoe", but could be wrong. Cool to see the photo either way.

  9. #9

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    Since the Federal Boat Safety Act of 1971, the Coast Guard has regulated the construction of boats less than 20 feet in length, including home-built. For the purpose of those construction regulations, canoes are exempt. To be exempt, a canoe must meet the definition below:


    BOATBUILDER'S HANDBOOK
    Safe Loading - Subpart C

    Applicability

    FEDERAL LAW
    183.31 - Applicability

    This subpart applies to monohull boats less than 20 feet in length except sailboats, canoes, kayaks, and inflatable boats.
    
For the purpose of this subpart, a monohull is defined as: a boat on which the line of intersection of the water surface and the boat at any operating draft forms a single closed curve or "footprint." A pontoon boat is not a monohull, but a catamaran would be if the top of the "tunnel" between the two hulls touches the water aft when in a static position and loaded with water, fuel and passengers. The footprint, in this case, will be a continuous line.

    A canoe or kayak or similar watercraft is defined as: a watercraft designed to be manually propelled or equipped with a low horsepower motor whose ends do not have a transverse dimension greater than 45% of the maximum beam and whose length to beam ratio is as specified below:

    Length
    Length/Beam Ratio

    14 Feet or Less
    3:1 to 5:1
    Over 14 Feet to 16 Feet
    4:1 to 6:1
    Over 16 Feet
    5:1 to 8:1

  10. #10

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    Thanks... a real working definition. By that I would assume some of the old riverboats in the photo would actually be canoes. It appears that some of them narrow down enough in the transom. And some of the canoes we use today would probably not meet that definition.

    Not that it matters all that much. The point is that long narrow boats are an efficient means of running rivers. I also have a photo of one of those boats under power with a bunch of people in it. Kinda cool. I'll see if I can find it.
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  11. #11

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    PICT0067.jpg

    It looks like they are not on step but still making good progress...
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  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by martyv View Post
    PICT0067.jpg

    It looks like they are not on step but still making good progress...
    Ya. That boats' carrying a load. Look at the prop wash. A mid 60s 18hp Johnson maybe? Look how they've got the motor adjusted down to push up the stern.

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