Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Kings in the Salt

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    40

    Default Kings in the Salt

    If a guy was so inclined to chase some kings in the bays, what would be a good fly pattern to use? I have done very well silvers, etc, but have not had the opputunity for kings, but I am heading to Kodiak for a bit and would love to try my luck.

  2. #2
    Member Kodiakfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    212

    Default

    I'd be interested in this as well. Last time I was stationed in Kodiak, kings on the road system were incidental, but I understand they run there now and I've got to get a couple. I'll either be in my bay boat, or in close out on my pontoon. I don't need specific patterns; just get me close...big flies, smaller "normal" sized flies, bright, baitfish? Get me close and I'll do the rest....

  3. #3

    Default

    Around the river mouths the few we've seen responded well to #2 Claussers in chartreuse/white on cloudy days, blue/white on sunny. A "sky" blue or "silver doctor" blue was better than a dark or medium blue. Deceivers will work if tied sparse, but they tend to run a little higher in the water on retrieves and maybe even require a sink tip. The problem is the sink tip cuts casting distance, and you'll HATE it in water less than about 4' deep. A floating line works both shallow and deep, switching between the Claussers in deeper water and Deceivers when spot fish cruising the shallows. BTW- Either pattern longer than 4" appears to be a waste of time. They're buggers to cast and the fish don't hit the bigger ones any better- sometimes not as well.

    Timing is pretty critical, because they're either there or not, more often not. There's about a 2 week span when they're coming into the rivers in #'s sufficient for sight fishing, but timing is pretty variable depending on rain. A long period of dry weather with low rivers kind of stacks them up off the river mouth, but they don't seem to want to hang on the flats like all the other salmon. Kind of swirl in for a bit on the incoming tide, but right back out again into a little deeper water. I know guys who've been pretty successful in Monashka over the years, but they're still figuring out the Olds and American. A little mobility from a pontoon boat adds greatly to the score, simply because you can follow the fish around.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    1,098

    Default

    I can only concur with what BrownBear said. I've had the best luck with charteuse/white claussers. Kings don't like shallow water and can be quite spooky so smaller flies have worked better. Kings also love to follow a fly about 6" behind it then turn away. I can't tell you how many fish I've seen swim right up to the fly, open their mouth, then turn and swim off. Gets the blood pumping for sure, because the next fish just might bite.....
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

  5. #5
    Member Kodiakfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    212

    Default

    Awesome, thanks. If I'm not in the pontoon, I'll be in my boat which will help because I can carry 8 rods rigged differently and Power Pole down on the flats and get up higher to see them if it's sight fishing time.

    Good to know about the fly size. Being a halibut and muskie guy on a fly, I tend to usually overshoot it on size, so I'll be downsizing a bit. I also tend to overthink my salmon flies as well. I'm still trying to settle on several patterns for sweetwater kings after they're in.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •