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Thread: KP Gardening?

  1. #1
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    Default KP Gardening?

    So I've heard that the soil on the KP is horrible. I am new to this area and find it hard to believe, but know where I am there is hardly any top soil. If they are correct, what can I add to my soil to improve it?
    -What veggies can I plant directly in soil and harvest in fall?
    -When do you normally put out peas and such? Thank you so much!

  2. #2
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    ESF
    two things to add to any Alaskan soil. Compost and Manure. However, for root vegetables (carrots, beets, turnips, spuds, etc) just add lots of compost.

    plant peas, beans, carrots, turnips, spinich, spuds, directly into the soil. Soak peans and beans in luke warm water overnight before planting

    depending on wx, plant peas and beans middle of may up here in the Mat Valley..

    brassicas need to be started (or bought started)

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    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    John is right Compost, compost & more compost.
    Fastest way to improve soil

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    Quote Originally Posted by Old John View Post
    ESF
    two things to add to any Alaskan soil. Compost and Manure. However, for root vegetables (carrots, beets, turnips, spuds, etc) just add lots of compost.

    plant peas, beans, carrots, turnips, spinich, spuds, directly into the soil. Soak peans and beans in luke warm water overnight before planting

    depending on wx, plant peas and beans middle of may up here in the Mat Valley..

    brassicas need to be started (or bought started)
    I do have a bucket of compost going. I have rabbit and moose droppings, banana peels, lettuce, pine needles, potato peels and some top soil I dug from under the snow. Was thinking of adding coffee grounds but I don't really want to make the soil any more acidic or do I need to? I have it by my wood stove, but outside how would you get it to heat up?

    I am also doing a sample of some top soil and and adding fire ash and rabbit/moose droppings, what do you think?

  5. #5

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    We start our peas in six packs and grow in greenhouse until the weather is good to go outside and then transplant them. They do better that way than dealing with the cool nights. It sounds like your compost is just starting so it will be a while before it is any good.

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    Member BRWHUNTER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eatsleepfish View Post
    I have it by my wood stove, but outside how would you get it to heat up?
    Composting inside, hope it doesn't stink too bad. Young compost has a tendency to smell. With regards heating, the compost will produce its own heat from billions of little exothermic reactions produced from various bacterium chomping down on the all that good stuff. Our compost made it to the mid 150's Fahrenheit, possible 160 I can't remember (we used a long meat thermometer to check it, made sure not to to mix it up with the one we use for human food). Here's a 12 page paper UAF put out about composting in Alaska which I found very helpful. It was our first year composting, successfully I believe, will use the compost this year.

    UAF Composting In Alaska: www.uaf.edu/files/ces/publications-db/catalog/anr/HGA-01027.pdf

    if the link doesn't work google it.

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Rabbit manure is great for enriching the garden soil. Mix it into your garden direct. steer and horse manure you might want to compost a season first to cook as many weed seeds as possible. Chicken manure you definitely want to compost a year first otherwise it will "burn" your vegetables.

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    The UAF paper was very interesting. As far as manure goes, does moose manure have any nutrients? I know there are lots of piles of moose manure in my yard right now.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    We set up a vermicomposting (worm composting) bin this winter and are pretty excited about adding that to our garden. We probably won't have adequate supplies of finished compost to apply this spring, but we've got lots of compost tea set aside for early season application.

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    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Need lots of compost.
    Some procedures I use to make a few yards per year:
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...Alaska-compost

    Several yards of Horse manure compost a few years ago:
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...Manure-compost

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