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Thread: Starting your seeds

  1. #1
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Default Starting your seeds

    O.K. there is still over a foot of snow on the ground and I just recieved 30 differant seeds in the mail, all are in the 85%-95%-germ within the last 3 months.

    Here is the question, is it worth sticking some of them in a damp paper towel for a couple of weeks, or just plant them in little cups?

    Thanks I'm just getting into this.

  2. #2

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    What type of seeds do you have ?

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    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    organic, at least thats what they said.

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    I'd use the damp paper towel wrapped with plastic wrap and use a couple extra seeds then you'll have space for. Save the remaining seeds. I store mine in a zip-loc in the fridge and they lose about 5-10% germination per year. Lastly, don't mistake leggy growth (the plant searching for light) for vigorous growth...keep light source close and bright (14-16 hours should do with quality tubes).

    Growing from seeds is the most rewarding form of gardening and the variety cannot be beat.

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    I started tomatoes & celery Saturday, (3-23) some sprouting, now under light & by a sunny window.
    I feel I'm a bit late but hoping they grow fast
    Have some cucumbers seeds for the GH to start but mid to late April for them.

    Pansies should be started in Feb. I will be buying pansies this year.

    Will start my garden plants end of April sometime depending on the weather.

    Type of seeds ? I think we meant Species
    You location is key also for when to plant .

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    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Heck I just put a bunch of differant kinds of seeds in one big damp paper towel, lol, a few quart size ziplocks with the ends open, see what happens.

    I bought a seed pack off e-bay, enough to plant a big garden, and most of the seeds arnt grown in Alaska.

    I just wanted to see if I could make them grow.

    I went with the orka,green beens, black beens, red beens,,etc.

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    I think that you can scratch the Orka from your list.!!!!

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    I start my seeds in 16oz plastic cups.When done this way there's no transplanting nessesary untill they go into the garden/greenhouse.I write each variety on the side of the cup with a sharpie and cut a couple small drainage holes in the bottom.I always have the first seeds sprouting in 3-4 days.I have a second light that also goes in this grow box which allows me to start 58 plants at a time.
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pike it alot View Post
    When done this way there's no transplanting nessesary untill they go into the garden/greenhouse.
    I've been told that transplanting seeds into a larger container actually leads to stronger, more robust plants. Does anyone know if there is truth to this? I start mine in what basically amounts to a small seed tray and then transplant to 4" containers after maybe 3 weeks before a final transplant to the garden after another 3 or so.

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    I've been told that transplanting seeds into a larger container actually leads to stronger, more robust plants. Does anyone know if there is truth to this? I start mine in what basically amounts to a small seed tray and then transplant to 4" containers after maybe 3 weeks before a final transplant to the garden after another 3 or so.
    I can only say what I know about transplanting tomatoes.. All the books and experts advise that when transplanting tomatoes, bury them clear up to the first set of leaves. the buried stalk will put out more roots, greater root mass, greater tomatoes...

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    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    I've been told that transplanting seeds into a larger container actually leads to stronger, more robust plants. Does anyone know if there is truth to this? I start mine in what basically amounts to a small seed tray and then transplant to 4" containers after maybe 3 weeks before a final transplant to the garden after another 3 or so.
    Quote Originally Posted by Old John View Post
    I can only say what I know about transplanting tomatoes.. All the books and experts advise that when transplanting tomatoes, bury them clear up to the first set of leaves. the buried stalk will put out more roots, greater root mass, greater tomatoes...
    Some plants like cucumbers don't do well if you bury the stalk when transplanting.
    But anytime you give more room for root to grow, the bigger & healthier the above soil plant.

    I do like you. 6 packs; then 4" pots ; then into the garden for garden plants.
    I have lots better success with the plants I grow this way than the "store bought", "root bound" ones .

    For tomatoes, I do like John, bury them up to their necks (same for sun flowerers)
    New roots form off the buried stalk.

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=mudbuddy

    I do like you. 6 packs; then 4" pots ; then into the garden for garden plants.
    I have lots better success with the plants I grow this way than the "store bought", "root bound" ones . .[/QUOTE]

    And that might cover part of what Brian's talking about. by moving plants up to bigger pots and then eventually out into
    the GH or garden, you keep from getting plants that are root-bound... anyway that would be my wag

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    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Well since I started a few days ago-

    I took a variaty of seeds and laid them on a moist paper towel and covered them and put them in a big ziplock. Opened it today and some of the seeds had broken open and had stems from 1/4"- to 3/4" on them.

    Did'nt pay to much attention at what I was putting in the towel at the time as I was'nt sure it would work, lol, so now I have transplanted 36 un-named plants into 2" pots.

    Ought to be an interesting summer in the greenhouse.

  14. #14

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    Plants suffer a small setback during every transplant but the tomato can be an exception...there are root nodes along the stem therefore plant them deeper everytime you transplant. I pinch off all but the top three branches/leaves and bury the remaining plant...not so much a larger diameter pot, but a deeper one.

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    This thread caught my eye since I just planted some tomato and lettuce seeds yesterday. I saw an article on facebook, of all places that showed someone in a big city apartment growing a small garden using gallon juice or milk cartons with one side cut off. They filled the containers with potting soil, then planted the seeds and put the containers near a window where they would get sunlight. The size of the containers eliminated the need to transplant.

    I have three containers now, two with tomatoes and one with iceberg lettuce. I'll see how it works.....

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

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    Default Transplant

    Tomatoes love to be transplanted when the stem is buried up to the top leaves. Cut or neatly pinch off the lower leaves, bury it like mentioned, and the plant will grow a much more extensive root ball from the roots which will emerge from the stalk. My tomatoes are transplanted three times and the stalks become very thick and strong, with flowers only inches from the ground, and certain varieties will reach 8-10 ft or so. I have even went as far as to lay the plant sideways in a trench and bury all but the top, which creates big rootballs.
    Above all in AK, choice of variety is paramount for success, and that selection is based on the environment provided.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKsoldier View Post
    This thread caught my eye since I just planted some tomato and lettuce seeds yesterday. I saw an article on facebook, of all places that showed someone in a big city apartment growing a small garden using gallon juice or milk cartons with one side cut off. They filled the containers with potting soil, then planted the seeds and put the containers near a window where they would get sunlight. The size of the containers eliminated the need to transplant.

    I have three containers now, two with tomatoes and one with iceberg lettuce. I'll see how it works.....
    dependant upon which variety of tomato you planted, at some point, I think your going to find a 5 gallon container would be better to contain your tomato plants.

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    Thanks for the advice folks. The tomatoes I planted are Burpee brand bush steak hybrids. I selected them because they are "dwarf plants", and the seed pack said they will only be 20 - 24" at full maturity. I figured they would be ideal for a smaller pot. I'm certainly not adverse to transplanting them later if they need it though.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKsoldier View Post
    Thanks for the advice folks. The tomatoes I planted are Burpee brand bush steak hybrids. I selected them because they are "dwarf plants", and the seed pack said they will only be 20 - 24" at full maturity. I figured they would be ideal for a smaller pot. I'm certainly not adverse to transplanting them later if they need it though.
    It's been my experience with seeds in Alaska that they often (more often than not) exceed the estimated size/height of the plant. Peas are a perfect example. The seed pkgs often say small or short vines, but I've had pea vines reach 7ft tall or better with a trellis to grow on.

  20. #20
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    I'll keep that in mind Old John. It makes sense too, considering how much sunlight they get up here.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

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