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Thread: Anyone else make their own jigs?

  1. #1
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Default Anyone else make their own jigs?

    I have started several posts about my own personal jigs and now I would like to see pictures of jigs other guys on here make.
    The fly guys have threads showing off their work I figured why not have the same for saltwater jigs?
    So aybody that makes jigs post up a few pics of what you make.
    They don't have to be fancy even if you just make pipe jigs post up some pics.
    Ill be sure and post some more pics when I get some more done and whenever I get a new mold or some new paint colors.
    I just ordered some fancy Purple powder paint to try and ordered a new mold for a smaller version of the cook inlet candy jig.
    I am also debating getting a smaller version of the Kachemak candy jig mold.
    So lets see em guys Thanks.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  2. #2
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    At the moment just 16oz and 24 oz leadheads. I got a 16 oz teardrop sinker mold and modified it to make jigs, the middle jigs in this pic. I suppose I should get an 8 oz lead head mold one of these days, but I have a pretty good supply of commercial jigs in that weight.



    The 24 oz is just a hilts and I like to rig them with the large shad bodies or grubs. Here are some commercial lead heads with the large shads.

    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  3. #3

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    One similar to Paul H's commercial 16oz. leadhead with a 12' swimshad/skirt...



    And I've made some 'mini' Kodiak Custom type bottom jigs for fishing ultralight...don't worry Tony I will never sell these!!!



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  4. #4
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Nice jigs guys. The Hilts Big Mojo bullethead has to be the most popular jig in Alaska for Halibut and lingcod.
    I bet a guy could make all kinds of jigs with a little scrap and what not from your average garage.
    Paul I seem to recall a picture I saw somewhere where they put an eye on the front of a large bank sinker. Then they put glow paint on it and a hoochie over that. The hook came off the back eye of the jig and it was an awsome imitation octopus or squid that glowed quite well.
    There has to be more than just three of us making jigs on here.
    Lets see some more pics from some other guys!
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  5. #5

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    No pics, but lots of jigs. Lead heads in assorted styles from 1 oz to 24 oz and the full range of sizes in Do-It flutter jigs. Spray paint mostly on the flutters, but appliance paint on the lead heads. Haven't got around to the appliance paint on the flutters yet, but likely will do so. It's tough stuff, and stands up well to rock pounding.

    I sure admire the creative work others are doing with their coatings, as well as the results from custom molds, but simply haven't had time to go there. I have to cast too many to keep up with losses by family and visiting friends.

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Ak2AZ.....I like how well you treat your 9.9 merc motor. LOL!!
    BK

  7. #7
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Another thing you can do is take a commercial jig and rig it differently. A diamond jig with an assist hook and a hoochie on the assist hook isn't a bad way to go, and if you have some scrap 1/2" or 3/4" ss round stock you can make up the style of jig. The diamond jig doesn't have the hoochie on it, but you get the idea.



    I'll try and take some pics of rigging up assist hooks and post a thread on it.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Member redleader's Avatar
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    I pour my own jigs in many different sizes I normally use tube baits and tip them with a piece of herring or cod fillet. When the bite slows up the jigs outperform bait and circle hooks for halibut and are all I use for rockfish and lings. They work great for kings and silvers also. My favorite hooks are owner super sharp for a good hookset, not much better then feeling the bite and setting the hook.

  9. #9

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    I make a bunch of different types of jigs and weights. From large 32oz bullet style jigs to smaller flutter jigs. I'm even contemplating starting to make jigs out of the round cannon ball weights I make. Now, if I could only get myself closer to the coast than Fairbanks and I might actually be able to use a bunch of them!

    Here is one example

    Jigs.jpg

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by bkmail View Post
    Ak2AZ.....I like how well you treat your 9.9 merc motor. LOL!!
    BK
    haha, I was thinkin "wow, that's one hardcore fisherman!"

    Not so sure my wife would allow that...

  11. #11
    Member fishingyoda's Avatar
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    I'm gonna be making my own here pretty soon. A buddy bought the mold were trying to gather lead and the hooks are ridiculous price wise. The cheapest I've found is online 65 bucks for 100, not sure about shipping As soon as I get some together ill post pics

  12. #12
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishingyoda View Post
    I'm gonna be making my own here pretty soon. A buddy bought the mold were trying to gather lead and the hooks are ridiculous price wise. The cheapest I've found is online 65 bucks for 100, not sure about shipping As soon as I get some together ill post pics
    Actually $65 for the 12/0 34081 hooks from Hilts isn't a bad price.
    My normal vendor wants $78.81 for the same hooks in a 100 pack and $26.27 for the 25 pack plus shipping.
    Checked another source and they want $74.25 for 100.
    Did you buy the Stainless eyes or just the cheapo brass ones? I recommend the Stainless eyes also I like the #3Long VS the standard #3.
    The stainless are only a couple of dollars more per 100 anyway.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  13. #13
    Member fishingyoda's Avatar
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    I think we got the brass eyes. My buddy actually ordered the mold and eyes. Leaving me responsible for finding lead and hooks.

  14. #14
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishingyoda View Post
    I think we got the brass eyes. My buddy actually ordered the mold and eyes. Leaving me responsible for finding lead and hooks.
    The brass ones should work fine just be careful unhooking fish and such so you don't twist the eye. I had some store bought torpedo jigs with brass eyes and hooks on split rings . I had grabbed the jig to unhook a smaller fish and the fish flopped and twisted the eye and the brass broke.
    Thats when I decided to use the Stainless on my own jigs.
    You should have pitched in for hooks when he bought the mold. Probably would have saved a couple of bucks on shipping.
    Either way as you have found out the cost of components adds up. It can be worth it though.
    What are you using to heat your lead? I am using a turkey fryer burner and 50 pound pot.
    Although they are a bit spendier I like the Rowell bottom pour ladles from rotometals.
    http://www.rotometals.com/
    I currently have 2 of them a 2 pounder and a 4 pounder.
    Are you going plane jane or will you be painting these? Either way works.
    Hopefully you find jig making a fun and rewarding hobby as I do.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  15. #15
    Member fishingyoda's Avatar
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    Default Nope

    I think we got the brass eyes. My buddy actually ordered the mold and eyes. Leaving me responsible for finding lead and hooks. Thanks for all the tips and advice.

  16. #16
    Member fishingyoda's Avatar
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    Going to use an old Dutch oven and try it over a fire first but might end up using a turnkey fryer or Coleman stove

  17. #17
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    A coleman stove will work, but it puts out barely enough heat so you'll have to run it wide open and keep pumping the tank to keep the fuel flowing. I've never used a fire to melt lead, you might want something with better heat control.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  18. #18
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    I have always wanted to see if a fire would work especially using the Rocket stove idea Grasslakeron posted about.
    But the reality is you need the lead at 650*-750* and maintaining that over a fire will be difficult. Too hot or cold s not good as the lead will not turn out right. Too Hot and the lead kinda turns crumbly. Too cold and it won't fill out some molds all the way.
    If you do use a fire it would be wise to keep it hot and contained directly under the pot. That of course makes it hard to keep the worktable with the mold on it close enough to be comfortable.
    Like paul has said the camp stove will work but on bigger pots I would guess just barely. And you contaminate your camp stove with lead.
    The Turkey fryer on the other hand can easily get too hot as it has plenty of BTU's but is easy to regulate where you want it. I use a thermometer on my pot to keep me on track heat wise.
    Good luck and let us know how it goes.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  19. #19
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    My lead melting coleman stove is dedicated to that purpose, you definately want to take health and safety precautions when dealing with molten lead.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    A coleman stove will work, but it puts out barely enough heat so you'll have to run it wide open and keep pumping the tank to keep the fuel flowing. I've never used a fire to melt lead, you might want something with better heat control.
    I have melted many hundreds of pounds of lead on a coleman cook stove and it will get the job done but its a ton of work. I hand casted almost a million bullets in my day and melted wheel weights to do it. I still used it for my dipping pot but I graduated to a turkey fryer burner for doing the wheel weights. You do have to keep pumping and you have to be careful not to get your lead too hot. Heat control is a bummer as Paul said

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