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Thread: Dog hunting use

  1. #1
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Default Dog hunting use

    Wondering how many hunters use there dog for more type of bird hunting? Or even rabbits
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    Gary Keller
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    Member Milo's Avatar
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    I used my lab for retreiving stupid chickens and ptarms, but never bothered to train him to quarter a field for them. He certainly had the instinct to do it and I think he could have been pretty good with just a little training.

    I have since trained him to hold down the recliner, couch AND my bed. He's proven himself quite capable of learning new tricks.
    Death is like an old whore in a bar--I'll buy her a drink but I won't go upstairs with her.

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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milo View Post
    I have since trained him to hold down the recliner, couch AND my bed. He's proven himself quite capable of learning new tricks.

    He has mastered this also all on his own. As I type this, he has claimed one half of my bed.
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    Gary Keller
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    Member tod osier's Avatar
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    Along with the bed laying on duties... I use my labs for retrieving and flushing in the uplands. I've really enjoyed the labs in the uplands and they have done very, very well and it is a nice added dimension - and they love it. I haven't done any extra training for the uplands, just on the job training beyond the basic OB and commands used for retrievers. Hand signals get used a lot to get/keep them in position, but I try not to over manage them - in the big picture they follow me and on the small scale I follow them. My older lab has retrieved or flushed and retrieved all but just a few bird species of what is out there - he has been great and has a few good years in him. I've been very lucky to have him.

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    Member tod osier's Avatar
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    As far as rabbits, my older lab likes them a lot and my younger does too, but not as much. I don't get too excited about rabbits and view them as a distraction, so I haven't encouraged it. They would get with the program really fast if I shot a few!

    It always cracks me up with they jump a big jack out of the grass. I would not mind seeing them flush a herd of Arctic Hare this August.

    T

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    I have since trained him to hold down the recliner, couch AND my bed. He's proven himself quite capable of learning new tricks.
    This time of year alot of dogs who have been trained to do the above all winter long start coming out of their holes......LMAO

    I primarily hunt waterfowl and occasionally upland birds, though im sure any dog that understands trailing (or tracking which ever your prefer hear it both ways) and the fetch command could be used for rabbit hunting.
    Jesse
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    Member Milo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thelast2 View Post
    This time of year alot of dogs who have been trained to do the above all winter long start coming out of their holes......LMAO

    I primarily hunt waterfowl and occasionally upland birds, though im sure any dog that understands trailing (or tracking which ever your prefer hear it both ways) and the fetch command could be used for rabbit hunting.
    Oh it's not just a winter thing, it's more like a lifelong pursuit. I hunted him almost exclusively for waterfowl, but he is officially retired at the age of 12. He's earned his spot on the bed, just wish he'd let me use it once in a while.
    Death is like an old whore in a bar--I'll buy her a drink but I won't go upstairs with her.

  8. #8

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    I have trained my lab to hunt upland birds as well as waterfowl. He does really well at everything now (he's five), but I did have a few issues along the way: First, he was a late-born pup, so his first forays into birds were on ptarmigan. His first season on ducks (around one year old) was not impressive, as he wanted to hunt the uplands, not the water. Second, I made the MISTAKE of hunting rabbits with him. I recommend against this if you want to have a true bird dog. He got so wound up over rabbits that he would run right past a dead bird in the chance of chasing a rabbit out of the brush. Three years of training (including an e-collar) later, and now he knows to stay away from rabbits.

    He's five now, and really, a very good all around retriever. However, I would focus on him to start with what his most likely quarry would be, then build up from there. If he gets too many options, you'll regret it if he doesn't focus on what you want right off the bat. My two cents: labs and rabbits don't mix, and if you want a bird dog, focus your training only on birds.

  9. #9

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    Gauge, our Golden Retriever will be 4 this July. He does real well on waterfowl, wether in a blind or jump shooting. He loves to hunt grouse & ptarmigan. On hunting rabbits, he stays at heel, I shoot, he fetch's, he loves it. He's been on 2 caribou kills, a bit to big to fetch-HA. He's placed in 2 hunt tests, I think he likes the competition.

    I've had 2 other Goldens. They were good all around versatile hunting dogs. Blitz didn't care if he was fetching geese, grey squirrels, quail or tennis balls.

  10. #10
    Member tod osier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by miller View Post
    I have trained my lab to hunt upland birds as well as waterfowl. He does really well at everything now (he's five), but I did have a few issues along the way: First, he was a late-born pup, so his first forays into birds were on ptarmigan. His first season on ducks (around one year old) was not impressive, as he wanted to hunt the uplands, not the water. Second, I made the MISTAKE of hunting rabbits with him. I recommend against this if you want to have a true bird dog. He got so wound up over rabbits that he would run right past a dead bird in the chance of chasing a rabbit out of the brush. Three years of training (including an e-collar) later, and now he knows to stay away from rabbits.

    He's five now, and really, a very good all around retriever. However, I would focus on him to start with what his most likely quarry would be, then build up from there. If he gets too many options, you'll regret it if he doesn't focus on what you want right off the bat. My two cents: labs and rabbits don't mix, and if you want a bird dog, focus your training only on birds.
    You observations are spot on mine experiances. I believe that both of my labs enjoy upland hunting more than duck hunting. I don't think that the upland hunting had an overly negative effect on their waterfowl, but I can see how it could.

    I'd would just abou guarentee that they would have the same experiance with rabbits, if I'd shot a couple with them. The only animal that my older lab (once trained) really didn't want to give up was a bunny I lung shot in the garden that I couldn't find and sent the dog for - he really did not want to give that thing up.

  11. #11
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    I just read an article in Wildfowl magazine discussing training techniques for trailing, and they use the "Hunt Dead" command in their training.

    My dog flushes really well. He busts through brush really good; it's a lot of fun to watch. He doesn't really point though.

    Quote Originally Posted by thelast2 View Post
    This time of year alot of dogs who have been trained to do the above all winter long start coming out of their holes......LMAO

    I primarily hunt waterfowl and occasionally upland birds, though im sure any dog that understands trailing (or tracking which ever your prefer hear it both ways) and the fetch command could be used for rabbit hunting.

  12. #12
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    My old chessie hunted it all (but rabbits.....that's a HUGE no no for a bird dog....imo). Anything from doves, quail, ducks, geese, pheasants.....

    I was totally amazed when she started pointing pheasants all on her own one day. I didn't train her to point, I think it was more of the overall way I trained her. Meaning......wait for a command for anything that she would consider good......lol. That includes steady to shot, and even her dog food. She had to wait until I told her it was "ok". So when she smelled that pheasant one morning she just stopped and held point till walked up to her. It was fantastic....!!!

    I don't think I'll ever stop missing that dog.......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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