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Thread: Rocket Stove

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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    Default Rocket Stove

    I just finished my rocket stove. It is made with 2" square tube with a 4" inch tube with vermiculite as insulation over top. It still keeps the ratio of 1:1.5 or 2. It took less then 4oz of wood to boil 12oz of water in about ten minutes. Weigh is about four pounds.uploadfromtaptalk1363532378436.jpg

    Ron
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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    118 views and no questions? I have made these lighter but I wanted this one built like a brick outhouse. The next one will be 10 oz or less. This was a proof of concept build. If anyone wants a materials list I will be glad to pass it on.

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    I'll bite...can you take more pictures from different angles, explain its sole purpose, heat for tent, heating, cooking etc. What materials are you going to make it in, is there a stack system or is it just for camping, hunting etc. Think the square blue thing that looks like one of those metal things you bang metal against with a hammer is what threw us off..

    AT 10oz I personally might be interested..but if its purpose is to do what my jetboil does..not sure.
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    The blue is ford blue engine paint. The whole purpose is to cook with, all tho you could heat up an area with it. The materials are mostly 14 gauge or better steel. The design is from the UN looking into using less fuel to cook with in third world countries. The 10 oz version is different but similar to your jet boil. Costs range from 20 dollars + welding time for the one pictured, to 8 dollars for the lighter one. I built this version to last a lifetime. Similar designs can be found on the net, such as, (http://www.rocketstoves.co.uk/) and (http://www.stockstorage.com/heavy_du...ket_stove.html). With the insulation that was used is sends most of the heat up to the food and not as much into the body of the stove.

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    Gotcha..visited the websites..makes sense now..sorry...lol Just never heard of them before.

    What are you going to make the 10oz out of? I can think of a few reasons to have on hand. I would assume we can develop one about any size. Appears to be just two square tubes welded together performing draft etc..pretty neat idea.

    Is is possible to develop one that would allow the back vertical piece to latch to top of the bottom piece or does it have to be one solid piece? Like a short stove pipe if you will? Could it be made out of round pipe where a stove pipe could be added to it to extend out of a tent etc?

    Sure you could play with designs all day long on this. The one of the first website you mention looks pretty sturdy. The second site shows a much larger and heavier version.

    let me know your thoughts..might not be a bad idea to have one that you could just take camping, hunting or just for around the cabin etc..
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
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    AlaskaWaterfowlAssociation@gmail.com
    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

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    Grasslakesron,

    Nice stove, what about one that folds down somehow for a back pack?

    George

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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duckhunter01 View Post
    Gotcha..visited the websites..makes sense now..sorry...lol Just never heard of them before.

    What are you going to make the 10oz out of? I can think of a few reasons to have on hand. I would assume we can develop one about any size. Appears to be just two square tubes welded together performing draft etc..pretty neat idea.

    Is is possible to develop one that would allow the back vertical piece to latch to top of the bottom piece or does it have to be one solid piece? Like a short stove pipe if you will? Could it be made out of round pipe where a stove pipe could be added to it to extend out of a tent etc?

    Sure you could play with designs all day long on this. The one of the first website you mention looks pretty sturdy. The second site shows a much larger and heavier version.

    let me know your thoughts..might not be a bad idea to have one that you could just take camping, hunting or just for around the cabin etc..
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMfbt...e_gdata_player

    I have made similar ones like this. They last about a season then you have to make a new one. 8 bucks a year compared to 20 in a lifetime. This gentlemen idea is easy to make but uses more fuel. The key is using less fuel especially when good dry stuff is hard to find. I boiled 12oz of water with one vasoline cotton ball and two pieces of dried walnut the size of your thumb.

    Ron
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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Riddle View Post
    Grasslakesron,

    Nice stove, what about one that folds down somehow for a back pack?

    George
    To be honest I haven't tried thin metal to weld. I don't have much luck it that. I have seen online a folding one but it uses more fuel, a lot more. The burn chamber needs to be insulated to improve efficiency as much as 20%. In theory it should be 95+% efficient burning the wood. It is also better at co2 emissions, in theory. Btw, the overall height is 8", 8" long and 6" wide.

    Ron
    "Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science"

    Edwin Hubble

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    If you could make a step by step, or post more detailed photos and measurements it would be awesome! I am definitely going to have to build one! Thanks for the post, that is a cool looking stove, I want to make a couple of them, one to have around and another to leave in my truck toolbox in case the need for it arises.
    Thanks,
    Riley

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    Ron

    When you figure out how to get it down to something lighter..let me know. I am will buy one from ya.

    might even be able to use 1/4in steel if the welder you have is good enough..size then would be the only issue...how big do we want it.

    Quote Originally Posted by GrassLakeRon View Post
    To be honest I haven't tried thin metal to weld. I don't have much luck it that. I have seen online a folding one but it uses more fuel, a lot more. The burn chamber needs to be insulated to improve efficiency as much as 20%. In theory it should be 95+% efficient burning the wood. It is also better at co2 emissions, in theory. Btw, the overall height is 8", 8" long and 6" wide.

    Ron
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
    http://akwaterfowl.com
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alask...78020265619952
    AlaskaWaterfowlAssociation@gmail.com
    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    I wonder if one of these could be built to heat a pot of lead for casting fishing jigs and such?
    Might save me some money on propane! A guy can usually find or acquire some firewood and with propane prices where they are it would be nice.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    10 minutes on google searching and this looks like a pretty cool thing to have around. You can make them out of stacked bricks for the back yard cooking, direct venting thermal mass heaters for home heating, 5 gallon steel pails for emergency use or camping, and tin cans for hiking - just have to plan on filling it with sand from where ever you are camping at each day.

    The tin can stoves and the heating flue bucket stoves are all reported to rust out in less than a year and have to be rebuilt. That is not too bad of a cost as long as there are stores selling flue elbows and tin cans.

    For general hiking in brushy country where I planned on cooking over a controlled fire I think I would stick with a caldera stove to keep it light and simple. however these top feeding stoves are a known PITA when it comes to refueling during a burn. The rocket stove bottom feed with air flow would be an improvement. And probably a simple one to add in to a sheet metal cone.

  13. #13

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    The native americans of the plains used similar design with their firepits...8" dia hole about 16" deep and connected to it was an air shaft from ground level to the bottom of the first hole. The shaft was directed toward the perdominate wind direction and was a little larger in dia and almost as long as the user's arm.

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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKGrayling View Post
    If you could make a step by step, or post more detailed photos and measurements it would be awesome! I am definitely going to have to build one! Thanks for the post, that is a cool looking stove, I want to make a couple of them, one to have around and another to leave in my truck toolbox in case the need for it arises.
    Thanks,
    Riley
    I will work on that sunday for you.

  15. #15

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    That's great! I would love to have a materials list you used to make this one. If you could pass on the dimensions and some building tips, that would also be helpful.

    As far as the vermiculite insulation, when that gets warmed up, do you think it puts out any toxins? Looking online, it seems that what others use, but I would be concerned wtih any toxins put out from it.

    Thanks for sharing!

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    OK here is the materials list:

    1-4" sq tube 8" long
    1-2" sq tube 12" long
    1-.5" sq tube 5" long
    1-.25" flat stock 2" wide x 12" long
    2-.25"x4"x6" plate
    2-cups vermiculite
    High temp paint
    Steel mesh

    Here are a few photos and measured drawing. I did not put the handle on it but the drawing has it.uploadfromtaptalk1364741557152.jpguploadfromtaptalk1364741574915.jpg

    Ron
    "Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science"

    Edwin Hubble

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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    Everything that I have read the vermiculite is safe. Building tips. Keep the 1.5 or 2 to one ratio. The stack should be 1.5 or 2 times the height of the opening. I welded a one inch piece of half inch square stock to keep the combustion chamber off the bottom. That way I could insolate it. Cut the two inch square stock at a 45 degree angle so your weld is easier. Then weld in the flat stock to make your wood feeder opening. Then weld your throat on. Next cut your four inch tubing to length but remember to add your piece on the bottom of your chamber. Cut to length then cut the opening so your L piece fits. You will have to make a piece to fill in under the two inch tube where you feed the wood. Weld that up then weld one 4x6 plate on the bottom. Drill and cut the hole in the top for the other end of the L to fit through then weld it on. Add 4 one inch pieces of half inch tube on top to set your cooking stuff on. Paint.

    Ron
    "Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science"

    Edwin Hubble

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruger01 View Post
    That's great! I would love to have a materials list you used to make this one. If you could pass on the dimensions and some building tips, that would also be helpful.

    As far as the vermiculite insulation, when that gets warmed up, do you think it puts out any toxins? Looking online, it seems that what others use, but I would be concerned wtih any toxins put out from it.

    Thanks for sharing!
    Vermiculite is a dust hazard. Depending on its source material it may have inorganic metals such as lead and arsenic at low concentrations. The good news is that after all that has happened in Libby MT vermiculite in today's market place is well tested. No manufacture wants to buy another town.

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