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Thread: Hello All

  1. #1
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    Default Hello All

    Hi,

    I am new to the forum, tried to find a intro area but computer is super slow loading these pages.

    Anyway I do not live in Alaska but in a similar climate and terrain on the east coast of Canada.

    I am in the planning and buying stages of a 26'X30' family woods retreat. It will not be off grid, but it will be basic and cozy.

    I have read multiple books on timber framing, and log home construction and love the log walls but the timber style roof is amazing as well. I have researched forums on both building techniques but each group seem pretty set in their ways that their style of building is best. In my area it is rare to find trees big enough to make a 6x6 log so I bought some rough cut 8x8 Hemlock timbers, I was not sold on the available "kits" on the market as the prices are high for some simple milled logs.

    I love the square log look and intend to stack these to create my walls, I plan to groove and spline all vertical and horizontal joins, bevel the edges of the logs to create an area to chink, then add timber style roof. All of this I plan to acomplish by myself with some help on some areas of construction.

    The roof is where I get caught up in a snare. I want to use my 8x8s for the ridge beam and rafters, but finding it hard to get solid answers on spacing, etc.

    I look foward to sharing my experiances on this project and getting some ideas from the vast wealth of experiance here.

  2. #2
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    What's your snow and wind loads for the area? You've GOT to know that before you can start to build. What kind of roof you going for? If you want T&G decking over those timber rafters, you're probably looking at a 4' spacing; if you're planning to do purlins on clips with sheetrock/paneling underneath, you can double that. 8'x8' probably won't cut it for a ridge beam in this scenario; you need a 30' glulam, probably 6"x16" or similar.
    "– Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Thanks,

    Snow load here is about 2 Kpa, 30-40 psf.

    I have no issues supporting the ridge beam in multiple placed along it length, I don't expect a clear span.

    My roof plan is/was, ridge beam of some sort, either my 8x8s/glulam/built up 2x12???

    Then 8x8 rafters 4' OC, 4"x4" battens notched 1.5" to fit over rafters 4' OC then vertical 2x6 for roofing. Then I plan to either use 3.5 Raycore pannels for the insulation or rigid foam and metal roof.

    Roof is 7/12 pitch. Walls are to be 10' high on the main level and the loft floor beams will be dovetailed in the log wall at the 8' mark leaving me with a 2' knee wall in the loft. This should give me the head room with the 7/12 roof. Also the longest 8x8 I have is 16', so 7/12 is the max pitch that will get me for a rafter with a run of 13'.

    I can also add another purlin to each side to help support the rafters.


    Reason I want the 7/12 roof is I will be doing the roofing myself and anything higher than that is impossible to stay on without help.

    Maybe I am out to lunch but I want a open rafter concept and a sealed roof and tossing around ideas to get it.

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Sounds about right; you could save yourself quite a few hours (or days) and toss the 4x4 battens, they're not necessary. Just run your 2" planking perpendicular to the rafters, then set your dimensional rafters/ roof sheathing on top. Do NOT skimp on your ridge on a setup like this, 'specially with that 2' knee wall; if there are any breaks in the ridge, support them with posts right down to the foundation. Can't stress this enough.
    "– Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Good stuff.

    I was starting to think I was loosing my mind.

    Building with timbers and logs is not very common around here and everyone I talk too knees shake when I run my ideas by them. Everyone wants to be sheepish and follow the herd.

    I agree about the battens but they look great from the inside, but in the spirit of cutting cost and time I will scrap them.

    then set your dimensional rafters/ roof sheathing on top
    I assume you mean the 2x4 framing for the rigid insulation or Raycore pannels.

    I like the pannels as they are screw on and go and you just attach the metal roofing directly but they cost a crap load of money.

  6. #6
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    I'd never heard of Raycore Panels; they look interesting, sort of a reverse SIP, lol. Here's what I have typically done in your situation (not my photos):

    Dimensional lumber framing over planking and vapor retarder


    Urethane foam insulation, with an airspace, then ply decking, then roof underlayment and roofing.
    "– Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    I am not much in to having the Gov involved in my life butdo u plan on having a building permit for the structure. If so I would either get a engineer involvedon your plan so you can sell it to the building department in your area there if there isgoing to be inspections. You said youwere not off of the grid so there may be a building department and a requirementfor a CO. The walls are easy enough toplan out but the roof and snow loads will and can him you up if it’s not right.Could cost a lot more later on. Just athought

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

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    Member anonymous1's Avatar
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    P1010012.JPG

    I have built a couple cabins using a timber frame open cieling plan that worked pretty good not sure how it would pass a building spection though

    We put timber rafters on 4' center covered with 1/2 ac plywood and framed over the outside with blocking and purlins for insulation and roofing.
    Scewed the ply into the purlins from the inside between rafters. Has a clean look from inside.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #9
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    Thats nice anomymus1.

    cdubbin, thats pretty much what I am thinking about.

    As for building inspections, I am not off grid but I'm not under any municipality to issue permits etc. The only thing I need approved from the gov is my well and septic, even out house if I go that route.

    Those Raycore panels are nice and quite like a SIP....quite expensive but really easy to use and quick to install. Sometimes you just have to ballance time vs money. A day extra with my kids is worth quite a bit. Once you add up the framing, vapor barrier, sheeting, I think I was within 20% in the difference...what to do.

    The Raycore pannels act as the vapor barrier as well, so its a one ime deal. Decking, pannels, metal roof. I think I will lay down some Ice shield on the entire roof first anyway.

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