Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 43

Thread: Hey you!!

  1. #1

    Default Hey you!!

    When In Doubt Don't!!!!! I don't know how else to say it!!! If you are a Bush Pilot or want to be a Bush Pilot or an ATP flying in Alaska or just a private Pilot flying in Alaska it is all the same!!! Alaska will take your life and won't even think twice about it!!

    Doesn't matter if you have 100 or 50,000 hours!! Alaska will take your life!!

    Man my heart hurts!! When in doubt don't!!! Practice and learn from others!!!

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk 2

  2. #2
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kachemak Bay Alaska
    Posts
    4,218

    Default

    My beloved homeland of Alaska has never tried to kill me....
    But my ego and the demands of others sure has a time or two...
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,461

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    My beloved homeland of Alaska has never tried to kill me....
    But my ego and the demands of others sure has a time or two...
    Yeah - - - like those European hunters who arrive on a flight that came over the pole and don't understand why we can't get out there when even the ducks and geese are huddled on a street corner waiting for the next bus . . . . .

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    northern alaska
    Posts
    1,160

    Default

    I'm not sure what is being implied on this thread. Best to wait and see what the investigators come up with before we jump to conclusions. There could be icing or mechanical issues involved...who knows at this point....

  5. #5
    Member RocketRick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    ANC
    Posts
    410

    Default

    Blame it all on testosterone Ha!

    Now that I stink abt it,....I can't rem any women pilots dieing here can you?

    Even amongst all the Ak flyhing books I've read, many more then once, I can't rem any..Hmmm!!!!

  6. #6
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Ketchikan
    Posts
    132

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RocketRick View Post
    Blame it all on testosterone Ha!

    Now that I stink abt it,....I can't rem any women pilots dieing here can you?

    Even amongst all the Ak flyhing books I've read, many more then once, I can't rem any..Hmmm!!!!
    The Gildersleeve's family in Ketchikan had a woman pilot in the family who provided flight instruction back in the 1950's or 1960's....not quite remembering when, but the story I remember is that she and a student died while on an instruction flight somewhere on the north end of Prince of Wales island.

    Also in Ketchikan, Ed Todd's wife, Helen, was a pilot and died in the 1960's while checking her trapline on Annette Island. The stories I heard said it sounded like she had a glassy water landing go wrong while landing on floats. She made it out of the plane and swam to shore, but died of hypothermia. They named the lake for her (Helen Todd Lake).

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    Gwendolyn Frary?

  8. #8
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Ketchikan
    Posts
    132

    Default

    one more...wasn't it PenAir that had a girl copilot die on the flight out of Cold Bay last year....

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    alaska
    Posts
    187

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by brhrdr View Post
    one more...wasn't it PenAir that had a girl copilot die on the flight out of Cold Bay last year....
    Same company and aircraft type as this accident. Occurred on take off at Sand Point airport.

  10. #10
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kachemak Bay Alaska
    Posts
    4,218

    Default

    Plus the guy and gal formation flying stunt that went bad a year or two ago........But I guess she lived through that one, just like the gal pilot who smacked the beach on Yukon Island .
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Hawaii
    Posts
    330

    Default

    Gwendolyn was flying a yellow supercub and got hit by severe mountain turbulence shortly after takeoff with her boy friend in 2000, both were killed in the crash.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    August 27, 1994. Doesn't seem like 19 years ago. Lost a good friend to a crash in 1999. Seems like a year or two.

  13. #13

    Default

    I started this post because I was frustrated that fellow Alaskan Pilots and passengers are getting killed and or injured and it doesn't have to be that way. All we have to do is get back to the basics. I work in an industry that has a safety topic before each meeting and or before each day of construction. All accidents can be avoided. As pilots flying in the Great State of Alaska we have to get back to the basics!!

    I used the term ALASKA because I didn't know the entire facts of each case other than weather conditions in Alaska. You can choose the other terms used like ego, pure pressure, testostorone, lack of experience, low time pilot, complacent high time pilot etc.

    Bottom line Alaska flying is unforgiving!

    I have read a lot of comments by other pilots on this forum and respect the knowledge that is provided. We all know that feeling we get when we say to ourself man this was a bad mistake and thank god when we get back on the ground. The when in doubt part is the part where you should have made the descion to stay on the ground and not have flown that day or where you should have turned around or just landed to wait for better weather.

    The goal is to fly another day!



    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk 2

  14. #14
    Member EMoss#83's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    511

    Default

    Amen Bro!!
    "f/64 and be there"

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,461

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Loose Change View Post
    I started this post because I was frustrated that fellow Alaskan Pilots and passengers are getting killed and or injured and it doesn't have to be that way. All we have to do is get back to the basics. I work in an industry that has a safety topic before each meeting and or before each day of construction. All accidents can be avoided. As pilots flying in the Great State of Alaska we have to get back to the basics!!

    I used the term ALASKA because I didn't know the entire facts of each case other than weather conditions in Alaska. You can choose the other terms used like ego, pure pressure, testostorone, lack of experience, low time pilot, complacent high time pilot etc.

    Bottom line Alaska flying is unforgiving!

    I have read a lot of comments by other pilots on this forum and respect the knowledge that is provided. We all know that feeling we get when we say to ourself man this was a bad mistake and thank god when we get back on the ground. The when in doubt part is the part where you should have made the descion to stay on the ground and not have flown that day or where you should have turned around or just landed to wait for better weather.

    The goal is to fly another day!



    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk 2
    All that SOUNDS good, but remember that not all accidents (nor incidents) really can be avoided. Think of engine, mechanical, or structural problems. Even with proper and ongoing maintenance. In the end, I suspect that more than 90% of survivable accidents can be laid to pilot experience and ability. Read the book, "YEAGER". A lot of that book relates to Alaska outback flying, though Yeager did none of it. He frequently pushed the envelope, but he had the right mentality, and the hright skills, to be successful at it.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    northern alaska
    Posts
    1,160

    Default

    Remember **** happens....two women pilots who died from structural failure of their aircraft. Shima in a 406 Cessna between AIN and BRW. The Talkeetna Gal who's CE 185 broke up in flight on the way to the mountain. Not always pilot error... Pilots depend on maint. to find structural parts that may be overstressed or corroded and near failure. Engines fail and catch on fire. Anti ice systems fail, usually when you need them the most. And on and on...
    don't jump out there and blame the pilots without knowing the whole story on any accident

  17. #17
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    I don't believe that Keli Mahoney's accident on McKinley was a structural failure of the aircraft. According to the investigation, all the airframe parts were accounted for and attached.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Hawaii
    Posts
    330

    Default

    Excerpts from http://airplane-accidents.findthedat...015/ANC03FA051 regarding NTSB findings for Keli Mahoney's crash on Mt. McKinley in 2003.

    The gross weight of the airplane at the time of the accident was estimated to be 20 pounds over the airplane's maximum gross weight limit of 3,350
    The CG of the airplane at the time of the accident, 154.1 inches, was compared to the limits at maximum gross weight, 140 to 156 inches, and found to be near the aft limit.
    No evidence of any pre-accident mechanical anomalies was noted. The engine was placed on an engine test stand, started, and operated at various power settings, for an extended time. The engine produced its maximum rated rpm.

    The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

    The pilot's failure to maintain adequate airspeed which resulted in an inadvertent stall, an uncontrolled descent and in-flight collision with terrain. A factor associated with the accident was rising terrain.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,461

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Monguse View Post
    Excerpts from http://airplane-accidents.findthedat...015/ANC03FA051 regarding NTSB findings for Keli Mahoney's crash on Mt. McKinley in 2003.

    The gross weight of the airplane at the time of the accident was estimated to be 20 pounds over the airplane's maximum gross weight limit of 3,350
    The CG of the airplane at the time of the accident, 154.1 inches, was compared to the limits at maximum gross weight, 140 to 156 inches, and found to be near the aft limit.
    No evidence of any pre-accident mechanical anomalies was noted. The engine was placed on an engine test stand, started, and operated at various power settings, for an extended time. The engine produced its maximum rated rpm.

    The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

    The pilot's failure to maintain adequate airspeed which resulted in an inadvertent stall, an uncontrolled descent and in-flight collision with terrain. A factor associated with the accident was rising terrain.
    Wouldn't that point to the wrong mentality and a serious lack of the required skills?

  20. #20

    Default

    I believe that is exactly the point they are trying to make.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk 2

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •