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Thread: Boat Navigation

  1. #1
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    Default Boat Navigation

    Was down at low tide one day on the beach in the Cook Inlet and noticed all of the giant boulders sticking up out of the water. How do boats avoid all of the large rocks? Would you navigate through them or avoid them completely?

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    Also, had another question. Is there any way to find out what a buoy is marking? Say at the Kasilof river, there are some green buoys in the fall and summer, but are not there in the winter, is there a particular reason for this? Why are they there?

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Mostly, I use my gps and stay out of the offshore areas and keep a good distance from marked rocks. When I go in shallow, I go slow, look for rocks - if I suspect bad areas, I post someone on the bow the first time entering an area. Cruising guide to PWS is also a good reference book when entering portages.

    You can get the bouy info from the USCG. The bouys at the kasilof are marking fishing areas - dipnetting areas and such. Someone will chime in with more specific info, I am sure.

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eatsleepfish View Post
    Also, had another question. Is there any way to find out what a buoy is marking? Say at the Kasilof river, there are some green buoys in the fall and summer, but are not there in the winter, is there a particular reason for this? Why are they there?
    Channel markers.
    entering port keep the green buoys to your left, Remember 3R's Red on the Right Returning.

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    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
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    Blue on your GPS = shallow water; * on your GPS = rock....some of us didn't know that at first and learned the hard way

  6. #6

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    Old John is correct. Red on the Right Returning.

    Simply, when entering a river or port, stay between the Red and Green buoys, they are the channel markers. Also remember that they are on a chain connected to an anchor of some kind so at low, or even extremely low tide they will drift with current and may be either "high-and-dry" on a sand bar, or floating out in the channel. I commercial fished out of the Kasilof for the past 8 years, and the markers are pretty good, but the channel can change a little. Also at low tide the channel of the Kasilof is only about 3' deep at the mouth, and only about 12' deep out to the Kan, which is about a mile. Slow and steady at low tide. The buoys start at number 1 out at the Kan,(marks the start of the channel) and then gets higher in number as you go into the river.

    They are gone in the winter since the ice flow would wash them away, and there is not a lot of traffic in and out of the rivers.

    If in doubt, hang around a little while and a commercial boat will come by and you can follow him.

    Good luck

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