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Thread: Waterless Composting Toilets

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    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    Default Waterless Composting Toilets

    In my office on the North Slope I have an Envirolet Composting Toilet. I've had it for about 7 years and has served me well. It's had a new fan installed in it a few years ago and its getting tired again. I found a new toilet called Natures Head. http://www.natureshead.net/ Seems like a sweet set up as the liquids are separated so it should be easier tro clean up. The Envirolet clean out tray gets hard to pull out when close to full and the raker bars have corroded over the years and hard to work.

    Has anyone had any experience with the Natures Head?

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    Member LindenTree's Avatar
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    Chico, I know this thread is over two years old but perhaps you or someone else may find my reply useful. I have been living in an off grid dry cabin for the last 5 years and use a "Nature's Head" composting toilet. it has been the best thing since sliced bread, not having to go outside when it's 20 below to do my duty. I do not have the electric fan feature on my toilet, I just punched a hole through my log cabin and let it vent with the hose. You use peat moss to help with the composting, if it isn't totally composted by the time the holding compartment is full, I remove whats left and let it finish composting in area outside. The price may be a little spendy it would probably cost you around $1,000 to buy and get it shipped to Alaska but is it nice. as with any type of composting toilet as you stated the key is to have your urine and your solids separated which this toilet does. Anytime they are mixed is when you get the major stink.

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    I am assuming this toilet could only be used indoors in temperatures above freezing. Is that correct? I would be interested in using this toilet for my cabin site, but I am afraid the subfreezing temperatures would ruin it.

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    Member LindenTree's Avatar
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    Bushwhack, I travel a lot and turn off all the heat at my place for weeks on end in the winter and have never had a problem with my composting toilet being damaged by freezing. Just make sure that you empty the urine holding tank and dump it out before you go, otherwise that may freeze and as with any water expansion, then the holding tank could be damaged. It only takes a minute to empty it. The solids compartment will not have to be emptied until it is full, since it is just peat moss and --it in there. I can go 1 to 2 months before I have to empty the solids compartment, and by that time it is about half composted. The separation chambers are hard to explain, but suffice it to say that they work well for my wife also.

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    Member LindenTree's Avatar
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    Bushwhack, one more thing. This type of composting toilets ideal use would be for a cabin. Since I live at my place and use it full time, I have to empty the solids compartment every 6 weeks give or take, and it does not have time to fully compost in that timeframe. I simply use a gardening trowel and scoop it out into a five gallon bucket and then finish the peat moss and solids out in my composting barrel outside. If you only use it when you're at the cabin you could probably go all summer without having to empty it and by that time it would be fully composted and would be not quite as yucky of a job to empty it. As far as the wintertime use of it in the cabin, the only drawback I have is the peat moss and solids freeze in the winter when I leave it unheated, then when I come back to use the cabin it takes a day or more to thaw the peat moss and solids compartment. Every time you take a dump in this you need to agitate it with the agitator shown in the picture, this solid compartment is frozen when you come back to an unheated cabin and cannot be agitated until it thaws, a day and a half is adequate time for the solids compartment to thaw depending on the toilets location to your heat source. The freezing does not damage anything, like I said just make sure you empty the liquids compartment before you leave so it does not freeze and expand. The liquids compartment is in the front of the toilet and has that nifty handle for lifting it out of the toilet to empty, as shown in the picture

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    Member ChugiakTinkerer's Avatar
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    Thanks for the summary of how it works for you.

    The price at http://natureshead.net/ is upwards of $1000 and I didn't even look at shipping. But might be worth looking into to keep everyone snug and happy in a cabin. My only concern about having it compost at the cabin while you are away is if it would be a bear attractant.

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    Member LindenTree's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChugiakTinkerer View Post
    Thanks for the summary of how it works for you.

    The price at http://natureshead.net/ is upwards of $1000 and I didn't even look at shipping. But might be worth looking into to keep everyone snug and happy in a cabin. My only concern about having it compost at the cabin while you are away is if it would be a bear attractant.
    Chugiak, good question and one that I cannot answer. I would guess there are many more things in a person's cabin that would be bear attractants such as toothpaste toiletries and such, not to mention the plastics and fuel that may be stored close by or in ones outbuildings. However, this composting toilet is vented through the wall to the outside so there could be that possibility. There are addatives you can buy to speed up the composting, those addatives could be an attractant. I don't use them and I do not throw any food scraps in mine, I also do not put toilet paper in it. I keep a paper bag nearby for my toilet paper and then I burn it when that is full. The vent could be moved up high on ones cabin and probably out of a bear's reach. I've never had any problems with bears and my composting toilet. Perhaps someone else on this site could chime in on what their thoughts are and experiences with bears in various types of composting areas.

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