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Thread: Pipe Jigs

  1. #1

    Default Pipe Jigs

    I've got a couple lead filled copper pipe jigs...each has 2 treble hooks offset from each other protruding from the body. I've read that they're very effective on lings and halibut....but then so is just about anything if you bonk them on the nose with it. I'm wondering if copper is particularly significant or if any old chunk of pipe would do? A chunk of galvanized pipe is a lot cheaper than copper and could eliminate the need fiddle with melting lead. I never have seen one in a store. Anybody out there use 'em?

  2. #2
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    They work very well. We use to make them in Oregon, and I used them up here till they were all gone. I might have to make some.

  3. #3

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    They (pipe jigs) do work but the problem with a pair of treble hooks is the damage it causes to chickens if you don't intend to keep 'em. There are sooo many lures with single hooks that work great so I've never seen the need to fish trebles for anything. Heck, I can't think of any lure Ifish fresh or salt, that has a treble hook.


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  4. #4

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    Yup, work great. But as others have said, ditch the trebles. You don't need them.

    We used to make a lot, cutting off the ends at 45-60 degrees so they'd "dart" a bit when lifted or sinking. Best for us was to haunt the junk yards for the chrome piping used under sinks and stuff. Tough finish and deadly. We'd also wrap them in duct tape to deaden the "tink" a little in real rocky areas. With all the colored duct tape available today, I'm sorely tempted to make some more. The chrome pipe is harder to find, but with duct tape plain copper would be dandy, and I have lots.

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    I have made some from API rings cut at a 45* angle on the ends. Attach a stringer hook to the top and your done.
    Nice cause they are made of stainless, are heavy, and free on the slope once used...
    Also tried dipping a bunch in plasticote (the stuff you dip tool handles in) and it gives them some color and deadens the clank as well.
    BK

    I really think any

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    You could add a skirt and it would be a lot like the Kodiak jig. We used 3/8 and 1/2 inch copper filled with old tire weight lead, then cut 30deg and 45deg. We cut 4in 6in and 8in. An old timmer in Newport said that the copper and lead gave off a elect charge when jigged, I don't know but they worked very well for lings and rock fish.

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    Well you can't get any newer to this than me...planing my first trip up this June and I'm in "full scale" Pipe Jig production mode. Thanks Garyak for starting a new thread on pipe jigs. My question about them is...Would adding rattles to a pipe jig be an attractant for ling and/or halibut? I saw above about reducing the sound when it hits bottom, so should I make 'em talk or keep 'em stealthy?? Thanks y'all.

  8. #8

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    Sound can be good, but a "thunk" on rocks is better than a "tink" in my experience, both for halibut and ling cod. Dunno about rattles. They've never done much for me in other fisheries. Best way to know is to try some, but have it figured how to add/remove depending on the answers you get. Sure like to hear about it if you get positive answers! I like the way your mind works.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garyak View Post
    I've got a couple lead filled copper pipe jigs...each has 2 treble hooks offset from each other protruding from the body. I've read that they're very effective on lings and halibut....but then so is just about anything if you bonk them on the nose with it. I'm wondering if copper is particularly significant or if any old chunk of pipe would do? A chunk of galvanized pipe is a lot cheaper than copper and could eliminate the need fiddle with melting lead. I never have seen one in a store. Anybody out there use 'em?
    I have found the copper color to be significant when fishing Central California, where many of the ling cod food fish are brown/coppery color. A copper colored jig (copper metal, copper paint, copper/brown duct tape,...) usually outfishes a similar chrome or white jig. I do better with white or other light colored jigs in SE Alaska, with my guess on the difference being due to much of the Alaska food being white or silver, e.g. pollock, herring, salmon. I have seen a few people using galvanized pipe jigs. They are good for shallow water because they offer a big target without a lot of weight. One big siwash hook works fine.

  10. #10
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I am trying some of the big river gammie hooks as recommended by B&J's on my jigs this year.......7/0, 8/0, and 9/0. They do have a nice shape - shall see I hope.

  11. #11
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Bull,
    Use A Mustad hook and you'll be less prone to breakage, stay sharp longer, and they last. I used to break or bend the point on my gammies till I switched to Mustad.
    The Ultra Point line is sharp!
    BK

  12. #12
    Member AKArcher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkmail View Post
    Bull,
    Use A Mustad hook and you'll be less prone to breakage, stay sharp longer, and they last. I used to break or bend the point on my gammies till I switched to Mustad.
    The Ultra Point line is sharp!
    BK

    Which gammies did you have the issues with?
    When all else fails...ask your old-man.


    AKArcher

  13. #13

    Default Pipe Jigs

    ...........

  14. #14
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    I have collected a few pieces of 3/4" Stainless tubing from work I was going to make into pipe jigs. It is all scrap with the longest peices being 10" or so.
    I have so many regular lead jig molds though I am not sure when I will get to the pipe jigs.
    With the price of metals so high nowdays I can see where scrap copper or other pipe is going to be harder to find. When I come across some I wont pass it up but might pass it on just for this purpose.
    When I get mine made I will post some pics.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

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    Try putting some bigger ball bearings in the tube.....make sure they have room to slide back and forth. zip tie a red shop rag soaked in herring oil to it and send it down. It works.

  16. #16
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    While I appreciate all varities of jigs, they can be as simple as a drop shot jig.



    Pick an appropriate sinker weight to hit bottom, and rig a hook ~18" from the weight and put a grub, skirt, berkley gulp, bait, what have you on the hook, and you'll catch fish. You can even use a jig as a weight, so long as the jig as only one hook.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    I am trying some of the big river gammie hooks as recommended by B&J's on my jigs this year.......7/0, 8/0, and 9/0. They do have a nice shape - shall see I hope.
    I have been using the Big Rivers for a few years now and they are very good. Sharp is an understatement but like most Gamakatsu hooks they will rust quick if not maintained.


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  18. #18
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Since I was making halibut Weights and Bullet head jigs today I figured I would make a couple of pipe jigs and post up some pics.
    I used some scrap 3/4" stainless tubing I got from work. The straight one is roughly 6" long and the other one is roughly 6" long in the straight section with 1"taper at each end.As you can see the straight one is drilled through and the other has a hole at each end near the point of the taper.
    On the straight one I put a cotter pin through the hole and bent the ends around.



    Then I stuck them in a bucket of dry sand and filled them up. You must use dry sand. Wet sand will turn to steam and might cause the molten lead to explode all over you. be carefull. Also preheating the pipe a bit wouldn't hurt but it shouldn't be cold.



    I stuck a #3long stainless eye in the straight one but you could always just use another cotter pin with the ends bent a little for extra holding strength.



    If I was to do it again I would definetly add a swivel to the cotterpin then attach the hook with a split ring.In fact I may melt the cotter pin out of this one and redo it.

    They ended up with the straight one weighing 15.8 oz and the tapered one weighing 16.1 oz.
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  19. #19
    Member Alan Sloka's Avatar
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    Smile simple pipe jig

    pipe jig.jpgI have been meaning to do this for a while. Here is a look at what I've been making.
    This one is 1/2" copper tubing, squeezed shut in a vise. I use 500# spro barrel swivels at the top and to attach the hook along with #8 spro split rings rated at 250#. I drill thru the pipe after it is filled with lead and use a 1/8" by 1 1/2" long stainless cotter pin to attach the hook. The nice thing about this set up is I don't have a melter or pot. I just use a propane torch. I hold the tube vertical at the shut end in a vise and drop pieces of lead in the tube until I get it filled. This one weighs about 12 1/2 onces. You can use 3/4" tube and they will come out 16 - 20 ounces.

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