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Thread: Question for Tipi Style Shelter Users

  1. #1
    Member CGSwimmer25's Avatar
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    Default Question for Tipi Style Shelter Users

    I bought and used a Shangri-La SL3 all season last year and really enjoy it. In preparation for a Sheep hunt this year I'm considering leaving the 12oz center pole at home and using my black diamond trekking poles in it's place. My concern though is in the event we leave camp up one day and some gear behind what do I do with the tent? I don't hike without my trekking poles and don't like the idea of my SL3 staked out with no center pole keeping it erect so I'm thinking the extra 12oz to bring the center pole along will be worth it. Anyone out there use this kind of setup with their trekking poles and might have some input?

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    Member CtP's Avatar
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    last year we used the sl-3 for spike and took it with us. That way we don't have to go back. If you have another shelter/plan for spike/bivy then that's a different story. Last year when I left the sl-5, I left one pole with it and put it on a rock to keep the teepee tight and had my other pole and ax if needed for the hills. You could always find a big stick and put it in the ...teepee

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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Just break down the SL3 and take it with you. It's good insurance.

  4. #4

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    Are you hunting solo or with a partner? Luke and I spend a lot of time in our SL5, and typically bring two sets of trekking poles on the hike in (two poles per person). When we set up the shelter we use one set of poles, and then split up the other set (one pole per person) for day trips away from the tent. Not the perfect solution if you knock something over, but it has worked pretty well for us.

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    Member CGSwimmer25's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Becca View Post
    Are you hunting solo or with a partner? Luke and I spend a lot of time in our SL5, and typically bring two sets of trekking poles on the hike in (two poles per person). When we set up the shelter we use one set of poles, and then split up the other set (one pole per person) for day trips away from the tent. Not the perfect solution if you knock something over, but it has worked pretty well for us.
    I usually hunt with partners but I use my tent by myself. I don't think they would take it too well if I asked for one of their trek poles so I could leave my tent up! I think I'll just take my center pole along but it just got me wondering what other people do with their shelters. Thanks for all the input

  6. #6
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    If you can get by with just one trekking pole then you can drop some weight by going to a pole jack from bearpaw

    http://www.bearpawwd.com/poles_stake...takes.html#742

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Another option may be to upgrade to the Seek 84" carbon pole. I am not sure what it's adjustment range is or it's weight but I imagine that it would be lighter than the aluminum pole.

  8. #8
    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    You can go full on crazy and buy a custom carbon fiber telescoping pole.

    Rock West Composites will sell you the pieces to assemble your own. It might set you back about $125 (2 35" pieces and a clamp), but you will have the coolest center pole out there.

    Or you can go to Play it Again sports and find a couple cheap ski metal poles and set up a fixed length pole system for a few bucks.

    The problem with both systems is that neither will pack down to a small size. You could get the carbon telescoping system to do that, but then you are looking at $400 to $500 in labor and parts to have it built.

  9. #9

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    I've never used the carbon fiber poles, but was interested...until I heard a couple first-hand accounts of c-f poles destructing under stress. My opinion today is that c-f might be okay in settings where a broken pole would only screw up a hunt...not risk harm.

  10. #10
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    The 84" seek pole is $115

  11. #11

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    While we're on the subject of tepees, how well does your work in heavy winds?

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bfish View Post
    While we're on the subject of tepees, how well does your work in heavy winds?
    Never mind, found the other thread. Sorry for the hijack

  13. #13
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    They do well in heavy winds.

  14. #14
    Member CGSwimmer25's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    If you can get by with just one trekking pole then you can drop some weight by going to a pole jack from bearpaw

    http://www.bearpawwd.com/poles_stake...takes.html#742
    I actually ordered one of these two days ago along with a new cuben fiber nest. Hopefully it tests out well when I get it so I can leave the original centerpole behind

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