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Thread: 10 Alaskan Books before Ice goes out.

  1. #1

    Default 10 Alaskan Books before Ice goes out.

    It is during this lull time that I spend time reading old books. I am wondering if many of the forum members have read these books about hunting in Alaska. They aren't in order but they are all about Alaska.

    1) Alaska Yukon Trophies Won and Lost by G.O. Young.
    2) Alaskan Adventures by Jay Williams
    3) To Far Western Alaska for Big Game by T.R. Hubback
    4) Bows along the little Delta by Glen St. Charles
    5) Shadow of Mt. Mckinley by William N. Beach
    6) Sourdough and Swahili by Bud Branham
    7)Hunting and Fishing in Alaska by Russell Annabel
    8) My Lost Wilderness by Ralph Young
    9)Pinnell and Talifson- Last of the Great Brown Bear men by Marvin Clark Jr.
    10) Alaskan Hunter by Ray Chandler.

    Sincerely,
    Thomas

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    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
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    I plan on Pinnell and Talifson, as soon as I finish Tony Russ' book on bear hunting. My buddy that I hunted Kodiak with last year highly recommended it. I am developing a fascination with float hunting this year, so I plan on reading Larry Bartlett's book as well.
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
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    Cool list kaboku, I'm currently reading the one you listed first - I love it.

    You left Shadows of the Koyukuk by Sidney Huntington off you list; wonderful reading.

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    I have read,,

    Alaska Yukon Trophies Won and Lost by G.O. Young

    Hunting and Fishing in Alaska by Russell Annabel, plus many of his short stories.

    Pinnell and Talifson- Last of the Great Brown Bear men by Marvin Clark Jr.

    Shadows of the Koyukuk by Sidney Huntington

    Alaska's Wolf Man: The 1915-55 Wilderness Adventures of Frank Glaser

    All of Tony Russ's books.

    Even though it is a new book I'm enjoying reading "Alaska and Me" by Billy Molls

    I have enjoyed reading since I was a child, seems like many don't have time for it anymore.

    Best Wishes Mr Thomas, thanks for the list, I will be on the look out for others on your list.

    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

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    If you fellas get a chance, read Shadows on the Koyukuk by Sidney Huntington. Amazing Story... Also don't forget E. Donnell Thomas Jr.'s Book "Longbows in the far north". In my opinion, Mr. Thomas is the best outdoor writer I've read.

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Nice list; I'd add "Alaska Wilderness" by Robert Marshall, and "The Cheechakoes" and "This Raw Land" by Wayne Short.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by standswittaknife View Post
    If you fellas get a chance, read Shadows on the Koyukuk by Sidney Huntington. Amazing Story... Also don't forget E. Donnell Thomas Jr.'s Book "Longbows in the far north". In my opinion, Mr. Thomas is the best outdoor writer I've read.
    MR E.Donnell Thomas was my Internal medicine Doctor when he lived in Soldotna.His father once won the Nobel Prize. A very educated family.

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    And if you think you are one tough SOB read "Born on Snowshoes", by Evelyn Berglund Shore

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Or "Alaska's #1 Guide.....The Journals of Andrew Berg"......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Don't forget "Alaska Nellie".

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    Good lists. I also enjoyed Fair Chase with Alaskan Guides and Alaska Game Trails with a Master Guide by Hal Waugh and Charles J. Keim, Targets Hit And Targets Missed by W Leslie Yaw, And Sitka Man by Al Brookman, are cool southeast ak (specifically Sitka area) reads as well. Growing up out in a cabin, I loved it when my parents would read The Cheechakos aloud at bedtime. Later I ended up spending several falls buying blackcod out in Baranof Warm Springs where some of that took place. I also just got done reading Alaska Wilderness: Exploring The Central Brooks Range by Robert Marshall. Great books for this time of year.

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    Oh-No-We-re-Gonna-Die-9781578333400.jpg

    This is my favorite book ever. It is humorous tales of hunting and fishing in Alaska. It is more like a collection of short stories, say 3-4 pages. Perfect light hearted read. Be careful where you read it, you will be laughing out loud!

    On a serous note "Oh no, were going to die" does foster food for though, as in, how to survive if the worst case scenario plays out!

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    Member Mr. Grayling's Avatar
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    +1 Spookum. His second book is also a must read.
    "In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks." John Muir

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    The only one on your list I have read is Last of the Great Brown Bear Men (Pinnel and Talifson). Good read. I would like to read the Bow on the Little Delta (by Glenn St. Charles). I have heard good reports on that one. Two more good reads you should add to the list are "A Thousand Campfires" and "Bowhunting Alaska's Wild Rivers" by Jay Massey.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    Alaska Yukon Trophies Won and Lost by G.O. Young
    I'm reading this now. I'm just past the part where they'll leave the city for some months. One hunter asks his guide where his family should send a search party if he's a no show on Oct. 1st. The guide tells him to have his family stay put and know that you died doing what you loved. He explained:

    - They had 20 packhorses to get back to where they were headed. To bring out injured parties, a rescue team would also need 20 packhorses. But there weren't 20 left in NWT because there just aren't 40 of them there.

    - And even if they did find packhorses, the rescue team would need to be led by a man that knows the area, but the ones that did were going on the hunting trip themselves.

    Pretty funny. No SPOT or sat phone in sight; this story is many many decades old. Love it.

    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    Shadows of the Koyukuk by Sidney Huntington
    I just loaned mine out again today; he'll be the 5th person to read my copy now. I can't wait to read this one again.

    Lastly, the bookstore here on this site often has books cheaper than amazon or ebay have available - I was surprised, but happy.
    Last edited by FamilyMan; 02-23-2013 at 18:41. Reason: sorry if some inaccuracies of my account. ...just going from memory...

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    For those who appreciate Shadows on the Koyukuk, On the Edge of Nowhere by James Huntington is another must-read.
    Last edited by Brian M; 02-24-2013 at 13:53.

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    Thumbs up Both of the Huntington brothers' books

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    For those who appreciate Shadows on the Koyukuk, On the Edge of Nowhere by James Huntington is another must-read.
    Definitely second that. That's the same yet very different story written by the other male sibling from the first book. Interesting how each tell of the accounts they both witnessed, like on their own in the bush with no parents/anyone, and breaking into the bear's den. Sometime I'd like to reread both of these books you call out but read them side by side and actually compare the two different accounts.

    I probably find that type of book more interesting than most, so sorry to go on. And Brian instead of the book you linked to, I think you might have meant this book, instead.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMCOD View Post
    Don't forget "Alaska Nellie".
    That sounds interesting. Read about Alaska Nellie in Wikipedia.

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    Woman Who Married a Bear

    A compelling narrator/protagonist and colorful local details propel this commanding mystery, the first of a projected series set in Alaska. Cecil Younger is a bundle of paradoxes: a hard-drinking private eye in Sitka, he writes haiku and lives with the guilt of career failure and the pain born when he wife walked out on him. Younger needs a good case to get his mind off his troubles, and it comes when an old Tlingit woman hires him to find out why her son, big-game guide Louis Victor, was shot to death. She does not believe the mentally unbalanced man convicted of the crime was responsible. Younger takes on the closed case mainly to placate the grieving mother, but after he is the target of potshots, he comes to believe there is a deeper story than the facts suggest. Throwing himself into the case, he travels from Sitka to Juneau to Anchorage to track down and question the victim's wife, grown children, friends and fellow guides. Sustaining the suspense from start to satisfying, unexpected finish, first novelist Straley, a criminal investigator for Alaska's Public Defender Agency, since suspense is sustained thru plot, seems awk to mention them separately has written a book whose unique, fully fleshed-out characters readers will be eager to see again.

    The Curious Eat Themselves: an Alaskan mystery: Cecil Younger Series, Book 2 - John Straley

    Publishers Weekly

    With the second adventure of Cecil Younger, a PI in southeastern Alaska, Straley reconfirms his claim to the regional territory he staked out in The Woman Who Married a Bear . Louise Root, who was raped at the Global gold mine where she worked as a cook, hires Cecil to gather evidence of the crime, although she won't tell him who assaulted her. Only days later, Louise's body is pulled from a river, her throat slit. Cecil is soon hired by Global's Lee Altman and Charlie Potts, who want to know "everything" about environmentalist Steven Mathews. They pay in cash, want no written records of the transaction and warn Cecil to "stay clear of this Louise Root thing." But social worker Hannah Elder, Cecil's former lover and Louise's childhood friend, has no qualms about involving Cecil in her probe of Louise's death, especially after she discovers in Louise's things letters addressed to Steven marked "return to sender." Once past the gimmicky assignments that initiate the plot, Straley's atmospheric prose takes hold and the action hums along, through unethical dealings and more killings, to the rugged, backwoods Alaska finale. Author tour.

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    Wolf in death`s clothing - Elizabeth Quinn

    Investigating a friend's near-fatal shooting, Wild America Society investigator Lauren Maxwell travels to a wildlife refuge in Alaska, where she becomes caught in the middle of a tribal conflict between preservationists and corporate warriors.


    Murder Most Grizzly - Elizabeth Quinn

    After discovering the body of her friend, biologist Roland Taft, seemingly murdered by a grizzly bear, Lauren Maxwell, an investigator for the Wild America Society, hunts a dangerous predator - of the two-legged kind.

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