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Thread: Bait piles and lure for canines

  1. #1

    Default Bait piles and lure for canines

    With the season pretty much over, I thought I'd gather a few opinions so I can start thinking about next year! I'm exclusively setting snares for fox and coyote.

    1.) How big are your bait piles? Any favorite things to throw on them? Do you end up needing to add to the pile as the season progresses? Are they out in the open or in the really thick stuff? I raise chickens every year and am thinking about saving and freezing their carcasses and guts for bait...

    2.) Anyone use lure? Any success or is it simply a good way to spend money? I'm doing nothing but snares, so I'm wondering if lure
    a fair distance away from my nearest snare would get them coming in on their normal trails to check it out (and hopefully get caught).

    3.) Whammies or not? This year for support I simply used some galvanized wire I dyed, and wrapped it from a branch, around the snare wire, up to the loop.

    Thanks for the input and I hope everyone's season was successful!

  2. #2
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    Bear mountain i guess i will share with you what i learned this year. DO NOT PUT BAIT PILE IN THE REALLY THICK STUFF. That is the most valuable lesson i learned the hard way this year. My bait pile was in to thick of trees and the critters were very skittish and didn't want to go into the trees. Last week i was feeling lazy with all my moose heads i had to haul out so instead of carrying them into the main bait pile i just made my bait pile larger and placed the heads at the entrances of all my trails in the wide open. Well one week later i checked which was this last weekend and there was fox tracks all over the place and my moose heads were half eaten. I added to my bait pile throughout the season but it depends on how much it is being used i want them coming in as often as i can so i threw stuff that i caught throughout the season on top of the bait pile. Oh one thing i learned from Rick on here is for your chicken carcasses and guts you need to go out and buy a couple 5 gallon buckets with lids. throw the guts and carcasses in the buckets and let them sit outside till next season. they will be really nice and ripe and it is a good attractant. Don't waste your money on lure if you are trapping on a bait pile. well i hope this helps good luck next year.

  3. #3

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    Thanks for the tips! I didn't have any bait handy this year, so I just set out a handful of snares on their regular trails and put some urine out on any scent posts they were using. I got lucky and snared one, but I'm sure my chances would improve significantly if I had a bait pile where I could set snares on their incoming/outgoing trails. I'll try the "chicken in a bucket" idea too!

    Where do you get your moose heads? Road kill/moose federation?

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    I think the bucket restricts to much of the smell as it can only come out the top, I use old white pillowcases and fill them with scraps and tie a knot at top. Then tie a rope below the knot and leave a few feet to tie to a tree. then I put it in a heavy duty garbage bag and leave it till the season opens. when your ready hold your breath and open the bag and tie it up in a tree, this will disperse the smell quite well and it will be up higher causing the animals to search for the smell and give more of a chance for them to get in your snares.....................
    I once held the yardstick of anothers perfection, I threw it down and carved my own................

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    Quote Originally Posted by BearMountain View Post

    Where do you get your moose heads? Road kill/moose federation?
    Fish and Game gets all the heads from the road kills for ageing and CWD testing. Give them a call and see if they have any available.

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    I think thunder chicken misunderstood me but his idea would work to. I like the 5 gallon bucket idea because i dont want it to smell around my house during the off season. But during the season i will take the buckets out and dump the goods all over a tree and let that be it. I then would take the bucket home with me to fill up again. The moose heads come from fish and game.

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    By the time trapping season rolls around it will be frozen in the bucket and good luck getting it out................
    I once held the yardstick of anothers perfection, I threw it down and carved my own................

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    The stuff that i used this year from Rick was something nasty. It would not freeze in the bucket and it poured right out. It was a green color almost coming out and it was nasty.

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    But did it work?

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    It worked as a great lure. They will not eat the stuff.

  11. #11
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    I mainly use baits for wolves and some coyotes. What seems to work the best for me is to use routes they already use, don't try and bait them into somewhere else. Then pick the terrain along those routes that will work the best. It is nice to have an open area that is not too large and surrounded by thicker cover. Also try and pick a low spot near rising terrain as the wolves like to work from high to low when they come in.

    If you can keep your bait clean they will eat it. In most cases when I have used bait that has been handled a lot they are leery of it and won't touch it, not always the case it is different from one dog to the next. I like to use whole moose or what ever is left from salvage, this however won't last long with ravens and eagles. That is why the whole moose is nice. Once you get the birds wound up the k9s are soon to follow, if you are setting far enough away and using travel routes it doesn't even need to be something they would eat. They will come just to see what the birds have found. Moose heads are great as the birds can't eat them all but, if you don't freeze them down or tie them all together the wolves will carry them off to eat in the cover and I learned the hard way that it is all but impossible to snare a wolf dragging a moose head through the brush.

    I like to put bait out in the open to get the birds on it fast. In most cases I pre bait with carcasses (lynx & beaver, or moose scraps) once they get some trails in and out then set your traps and snares and re bait.Now they are comfortable coming in and you don't have to guess where to hang snares. Don't just set near the bait set way off several hundred yards to a mile away along their routes.

    Here is a bait I started around two weeks ago. I dumped some heads and lynx carcasses on this log jam. There were three wolves that had been through the are a couple times in the last month. They came back and cleaned up the bait. Then i dumped the remains of a DLP moose carcass which they hit two days later. Sat I hung snares along the top and bottom of the bluff in the back ground and in the alders along the creek boundaries. Tonight I dumped another moose, it is in the center of the log jam on top in the pic. It is a lot of bait for three wolves but it is also mating season so who knows what may hit the bait.
    That was kind of long but I hope it helps someone out a little.



  12. #12

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    I appreciate the details nooksack! Just to summarize from everyone's comments, I'm hearing two different options:

    1. Use some outrageously stinky/rotten bait to get canines to come in and investigate. They probably won't eat the stuff. My guess is I'd have to snare them as they come in to investigate, as they may not come back knowing the stuff is too rotten to eat. Sounds like you guys dump or tie it to trees.

    2. I can use fresh carcasses/scraps/etc but will likely have to rebait often. Birds will bring in the canines but do a number on the bait pile.

    It sounds like I have some options next year. In the meantime, all of this year's carcasses and scraps are going into the freezer or buckets for the trapping season! Thanks again!

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    Sort of bearmountain, When you combine the two options together that is what i am doing. I use really stinky rotten stuff they woun't eat as an attractant and then provide them with a carcass or something of that nature that they can eat.

  14. #14

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    Cool. Sounds like I'm on the right track. The last couple weeks of season I did just that: I didn't have any stinky stuff so I hung a rag drenched with lure from a tree and put some spoiled moose meat at the bottom. I set snares along the little ridges surrounding the lure and meat.

    Do folks leave their snares in the field with the loops close to ensure no scent, or do most folks bring their snares home?

    And how about whammies? Anyone use those to position their snares or have any opinions on their use?

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    For the areas that you know you want to trap next year you can leave your snares in the field just close them up.

  16. #16

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    Well, it sounds like your guys' advice was spot on. On my last line check I placed a rag with lure on it in a spruce tree in an open patch of woods and added some spoiled moose meat to the base of the tree. The fox never came all the way up to the tree, but it interested him enough to travel the nearby ridge and get caught in one of my snares! A great way to end the season. Thanks again for the info and advice.

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