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Thread: Here is another reason to catch your own fish!

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    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    Default Here is another reason to catch your own fish!

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    Man, I catch tuna ALL the time when I fish out of PWS. Now and then I'll pick up a few marlin. Of course they all look like salmon.
    Funny, you'd think that the most likely place for someone to realize that what they're being fed is not what they ordered would be a sushi place. It's not like it's breaded and fried and you can't see it. But then again I've only been in a real sushi place once. Ended up drinking enough saki that all the fish ended up looking and tasting the same

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    Member jmg's Avatar
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    It truly is a blessing living in Alaska and being able to know what is going on your plate when you only eat what you actually catch. Here is another article that was on CNN today about fish being mislabeled. Huge issue apparently. Other than sushi restaurants (which this article makes me just sigh heavily about), I haven't bought a piece of fish in nearly a decade.

    http://eatocracy.cnn.com/2013/02/21/...udy/?hpt=hp_c3
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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I have to admit that my favorite seafood is tuna, raw, lightly seared, poke, all good. But, I've found many tuna recipes are pretty good when you substitute sockeye. Try marinading cubes of sockeye and lightly searing them, they melt in your mouth.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmg View Post
    It truly is a blessing living in Alaska and being able to know what is going on your plate when you only eat what you actually catch. Here is another article that was on CNN today about fish being mislabeled. Huge issue apparently. Other than sushi restaurants (which this article makes me just sigh heavily about), I haven't bought a piece of fish in nearly a decade.

    http://eatocracy.cnn.com/2013/02/21/...udy/?hpt=hp_c3
    jmg! Long time no see! It is good to see your avatar again. You are a fair-minded, sensible person and I missed you.

    OK, highjack over.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    I have to admit that my favorite seafood is tuna, raw, lightly seared, poke, all good. But, I've found many tuna recipes are pretty good when you substitute sockeye. Try marinading cubes of sockeye and lightly searing them, they melt in your mouth.
    No, no, no! After finding balls of worms inside the gut cavity of chrome bright reds, I will never eat anything other than well-cooked fish. If you do so, you are playing Russian Roulette with your health.

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    in sushi bars "white tuna" is usually escolar, also sold as "walu" especially in Hawaii. I generally ask before i order, but i LIKE escolar and don't hesitate to eat it. I have eaten lots of it in Hawaii, and more than my share as sushi and have never suffered any ill effects.
    Ask your sushi-ya if he is serving shiromaguro (albacore or "white tuna") or aburasokomutsu (escolar).
    If he doesn't know, find another sushi bar!
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    What I find most disturbing is that the article did not say what the faux 'tuna' actually was ...

    ... ok, so maybe the side effects of escolar were a bit more disturbing. Didn't Jeff Foxworthy include something like that in one of his skits?

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by homerdave View Post
    Ask your sushi-ya if he is serving shiromaguro (albacore or "white tuna") or aburasokomutsu (escolar).
    If he doesn't know, find another sushi bar!
    Maybe I'll just go to a bar that serves fish n' chips. Color me skeptical about raw fish.

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    Freezing will kill most if not all parasites in saltwater fish, though no way will I eat raw bottom dwellers as I've seen plenty of worms in cod, lingcod and halibut. To me "well cooked" fish is a crime. At most it should be cooked until the flesh just firms up. I'm afraid I'd have a tough time removing raw fish from my diet.

    The only time I've become ill from food was from "well cooked" meat. Once from a restaraunt, once on a 13 hour international commercial airline flight.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    No, no, no! After finding balls of worms inside the gut cavity of chrome bright reds, I will never eat anything other than well-cooked fish. If you do so, you are playing Russian Roulette with your health.
    You, sir, are missing out on one of life's great pleasures! Raw fish or lightly cooked (seared) fish is among the finest foods known to man, provided that the fish was well cared for (bled and iced immediately) and is of a good variety. As for reds, taken from the salt they make nice sushi. Taken from the freshwater, they should be cooked - but certainly not over-cooked.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    You, sir, are missing out on one of life's great pleasures! Raw fish or lightly cooked (seared) fish is among the finest foods known to man, provided that the fish was well cared for (bled and iced immediately) and is of a good variety. As for reds, taken from the salt they make nice sushi. Taken from the freshwater, they should be cooked - but certainly not over-cooked.
    I've eaten my share of raw salmon and trout alongside my Eskimo friends and family. It's called aaripaq, and I do like the taste. I have eaten lots of salted and pickled fish too. Lots! But after seeing slides of what is in fish flesh- and stays there until WELL cooked- I have foresworn completely. All my fish is cooked to flake nowadays. Might say I am religious about it.
    My wife still eats raw fish. She can do what she wants, but the thought of parasites entering my flesh from fish flesh creeps me out.

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    One of my most fondest memories while stationed in Okinawa Japan was fishing with the local fishermen and when the first tuna came aboard, it was immediately cut up and eaten right there on the boat. Can't get any fresher than that unless you take a bite out of it under water. If or when after retirement I start my charter fishing business, that is a tradition I plan to have!

    Have to agree with another post below, the only time I've ever gotten sick was from cooked food. I love sushi and will always eat it, but it's not for everyone.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    You, sir, are missing out on one of life's great pleasures! Raw fish or lightly cooked (seared) fish is among the finest foods known to man, provided that the fish was well cared for (bled and iced immediately) and is of a good variety. As for reds, taken from the salt they make nice sushi. Taken from the freshwater, they should be cooked - but certainly not over-cooked.
    Brian is dead on. I over cooked fish (salmon especially) for more years than I care to admit, once I started listening to my wife about undercooking reds, wow - what a difference. I also fish a lot out of Seward and the silvers are just as good if not a little better fresh out of the saltwater...
    Tony

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Who is talking about over-cooking? Not I!
    I bake or grill fish of any species in a foil pouch with water, butter, lemon, onion and spices in order to poach it in its own "liquor". I cook it just enough to flake the flesh, and I agree, overcooking fish ruins the texture and taste. The key to good fish cooking is to keep it moist and infuse flavors.
    This is not to say that I do not smoke fish... which is a whole other topic.

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    Oh how I love Tuna Poke... I actually made Shrimp Poke the other day and it was not bad. I love shrimp ceviche as well as making it with salmon or halibut. Halibut cheeks fresh off the fish, sliced super think and dipped in wasibi soy sauce is also very good.
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    PAYBACK

    Last August I gave my time to two visiting USCG friends of my Kodiak homeowner whose downstairs apartment I lease. My lease owner is a capable skipper in the seas, but strangely does not river fish in Kodiak. I do. I gave those boys my all, put them on fish and technique, and they were elated.

    How elated?

    Try a one week vacation to Honolulu where they live, guest apartment provided, and a week of comped fishing on both their boats for Ahai tuna during peak season. I've never had at it for this south Pacific prize and now here it comes.

    Be nice to visitors when they make it to the Last Frontier. One never knows what kind of rewards might wind up on the end of your lines...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bernard R. Rosenberg View Post
    ,...How elated?

    Try a one week vacation to Honolulu where they live, guest apartment provided, and a week of comped fishing on both their boats for Ahai tuna during peak season. I've never had at it for this south Pacific prize and now here it comes.

    Rosenberg; Sarasota, FL / Kodiak, AK / Zhengzhou, CN
    Just now, as I was going to work you over for, "all the pics you snapped out there,..."
    I realize this boldened line,

    So this trip is yet to come,...and you will take some photos for us right,...??

    Something about a trip like that, is a DREAM of mine,...have never yet been out to the Ocean Fishing grounds down south
    and Tuna, is certainly one of the most delectable of species I've ever enjoyed

    but the Fish Itself,...is just magnificent example of Bullet Like, form, I like just looking at 'em while they still have the skin on

    so, I'm hoping you take a few pics for the Forum Fish Addicts, to drool over

    Kudos to you BR, for taking care of the travelers,...
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Thanks for the kind words.

    Yes; I will do the pics.

    Interesting tidbit that the USCG guys shared with me is that in warm waters that fish when hooked, actually will start to cook itself. They keep battles short, land quick, cut the gill, and ice immediately.

    I don't know duck-squat about this type of fishing, but I sure look forward to be on the learning curve...
    "Two decades researching and defining fishing opportunities in the Last Frontier!"


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    I ate at a sushi restaurant for only the second time recently. Wanted to try some sashimi, as I was headed out on a tuna fishing trip shortly after. My buddy and I ordered the "Sashimi Sampler" lunch. Three pieces each of three species of fish: tuna, salmon and a white fish. Being the discerning fish eater, I asked what kind of salmon it was. The server said, proudly, "Alaskan salmon!" Being familiar with the various species of salmon in AK, I further asked what species it was. She had to go ask the chef and returned to say, "Oh, it's Atlantic salmon." Hence, farmed. Then I asked about the "white fish." She said, again proudly, "Chilean Seabass!" Which, in fact, is not a bass at all, but rather the Patagonian Toothfish, which comes from incredibly dirty fisheries, is unsustainable, and was given the moniker Chilean Seabass years ago as a marketing ploy (that clearly worked). At least it was in fact tuna. But I'll neveragain eat fish I haven't caught myself.
    "The Gods do not subtract from the allotted span of men's lives the hours spent in fishing" Assyrian Tablet 2000 B.C.

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