Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23

Thread: STARTING Fluid for cleaning Barrel for PAINTING.....???? OK..???

  1. #1

    Default STARTING Fluid for cleaning Barrel for PAINTING.....???? OK..???

    I have what I have, and I ain't spending $124.00 to drive to Anchorage for what I Don't have....

    YES, I know it is highly flameable.

    I can't remove the handguard, and the finish paint job quality is not important.

    Is there any problem with spraying the barrel through the handguard openings with Starting Fluid, on this AR-15.......???

  2. #2
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Tanana Valley AK
    Posts
    7,217

    Default

    Ether does a fine job of cleaning and leaves no residue. Best to do it outside though, well away from ignition sources.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

  3. #3
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Dillingham, AK
    Posts
    2,482

    Default

    Starting fluid is standard fare for me and gun gleaning. Minding a few obvious caveats (ignition source/ventilation/etc.) it should produce the results you're after.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

  4. #4

    Default

    When you live in a very small cabin with a wood stove.......and you eat baked beans for breakfast with beer.........you go out side to fart, for fear for the entire cabin exploding.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,121

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    When you live in a very small cabin with a wood stove.......and you eat baked beans for breakfast with beer.........you go out side to fart, for fear for the entire cabin exploding.
    That is just plain funny! I needed a good laugh today so thank you!

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    welfare state of Alaska
    Posts
    5,153

    Default ether or starting fluid?

    Pure ether is great but kinda hard to get unless you are in the medical field, and medical grade stuff is pricey.

    Engine starting fluid is basically ether BUT it usually contains an upper cylinder lubricant i.e. oil according to the two brands I have on hand. You don't want to wash the oil off the cylinders with ether so they add some to the starting fluid.

    Brake cleaner spray is the best bet - it states on the label that is leaves no residue as oil and brakes don't go together too well. I pick up the cheap brands at the discount stores.


    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    Ether does a fine job of cleaning and leaves no residue. Best to do it outside though, well away from ignition sources.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post

    Brake cleaner spray is the best bet - it states on the label that is leaves no residue as oil and brakes don't go together too well. I pick up the cheap brands at the discount stores.
    I have to work with what I have on hand.......

  8. #8
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Tanana Valley AK
    Posts
    7,217

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post
    Pure ether is great but kinda hard to get unless you are in the medical field, and medical grade stuff is pricey.

    Engine starting fluid is basically ether BUT it usually contains an upper cylinder lubricant i.e. oil according to the two brands I have on hand. You don't want to wash the oil off the cylinders with ether so they add some to the starting fluid.

    Brake cleaner spray is the best bet - it states on the label that is leaves no residue as oil and brakes don't go together too well. I pick up the cheap brands at the discount stores.
    Well, I learn something new every day. It has been a long time since I had any starting fluid on hand, but am pretty sure it was straight ether. I use a lot of brake cleaner, as well as isopropyl. Definitely want to stay away from acetone, which leaves a residue that can interfere with some paints and adhesives, etc.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

  9. #9
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    Well, I learn something new every day. It has been a long time since I had any starting fluid on hand, but am pretty sure it was straight ether. I use a lot of brake cleaner, as well as isopropyl. Definitely want to stay away from acetone, which leaves a residue that can interfere with some paints and adhesives, etc.
    Yup he is correct, there is a tiny bit of extremely light oil in starting fluid and also in carburetor cleaner sprays. Brake cleaner is cheaper, no residue, fast drying, just the ticket for all kinds of stuff . . . Even starting a cold motor so I buy the stuff cheap as I can find by the gross! The oil in starting fluid is so little it has never been an issue for me but there are likely things it would react with.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    welfare state of Alaska
    Posts
    5,153

    Default easy check..

    An easy way to check for oily residue is to spray some on a brown paper bag - the old kind we used to get everything in the store put into. Let it dry and hold it up to the light - any oil will show up easily.

    One advantage of ether I recall is that it will evaporate and take any water traces with it as it drys. If you get your gun wet it is an easy way to dry out the hard to clean parts like the inside of the bolt, trigger mechanism etc. It would probably be a good treatment prior to taking a gun out in extremely cold weather.


    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    Yup he is correct, there is a tiny bit of extremely light oil in starting fluid and also in carburetor cleaner sprays. Brake cleaner is cheaper, no residue, fast drying, just the ticket for all kinds of stuff . . . Even starting a cold motor so I buy the stuff cheap as I can find by the gross! The oil in starting fluid is so little it has never been an issue for me but there are likely things it would react with.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  11. #11
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    You do dishes, right? Water and dish soap works good to prep stuff for painting. If you are just rattle can painting an AR, it's more than enough to get the job done.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  12. #12
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,291

    Default

    What kind of paint you plan using??? I am interested in doing same thing to a SS marlin bolt rifle I got, plain SS shines too much. Wood stove paint seems to scuff easily,but hear of people using it, maybe a satin clear coat on top of that? Just curious to your plan stan!

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    788

    Default

    Starting fluid, brake cleaner, there all the same at the end. We used it for years in the MILeven thought we were not supposed too. Itwill over time break down the finish but it will clean the carbon out

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

  14. #14
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akrstabout View Post
    What kind of paint you plan using??? I am interested in doing same thing to a SS marlin bolt rifle I got, plain SS shines too much. Wood stove paint seems to scuff easily,but hear of people using it, maybe a satin clear coat on top of that? Just curious to your plan stan!
    High temperature paints like wood stove or exhaust paint need a very high temperature to cure out. You spray them on and they dry but they stay very soft and uncured until they are heated, they then change make-up, the stuff kind of melts into a durable surface. They are no good for guns because guns never get hot enough, we are talking heat that would char the wood stock or flat out melt a composite stock.
     
    For cheap you want cheap rattle can paint, that will cure out on a gun. Stainless is another problem as is aluminum, they don’t hold paint well. To get those to hold paint you need “tooth” for the paint to grab then a high bonding paint like a primer first then your Krylon. But if you truly want it durable you need a two part epoxy type paint system such as automotive paint or Duracoat. Any single stage you spray directly on stainless or aluminum will come right back off it.
     
    For cheap
    Scuff, prime, alow to flash, then Krylon
    Or
    Scuff and shoot with truck bed liner for slightly more durability.
    Or to do it best:
    Beed blast and shoot with automotive epoxy type systems such as Duracoat, Crycoat, Emron and so on.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  15. #15
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,291

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    High temperature paints like wood stove or exhaust paint need a very high temperature to cure out. You spray them on and they dry but they stay very soft and uncured until they are heated, they then change make-up, the stuff kind of melts into a durable surface. They are no good for guns because guns never get hot enough, we are talking heat that would char the wood stock or flat out melt a composite stock.
     
    For cheap you want cheap rattle can paint, that will cure out on a gun. Stainless is another problem as is aluminum, they don’t hold paint well. To get those to hold paint you need “tooth” for the paint to grab then a high bonding paint like a primer first then your Krylon. But if you truly want it durable you need a two part epoxy type paint system such as automotive paint or Duracoat. Any single stage you spray directly on stainless or aluminum will come right back off it.
     
    For cheap
    Scuff, prime, alow to flash, then Krylon
    Or
    Scuff and shoot with truck bed liner for slightly more durability.
    Or to do it best:
    Beed blast and shoot with automotive epoxy type systems such as Duracoat, Crycoat, Emron and so on.
    Not gonna go thru all that work I don't think! If I'd get it bead blasted, I'd leave it like that, atleast it's not shining like a florescent light bulb! Yeah when we painted my boat we had to use an two part acid etch process then primer, lit it kick off but top coat in less than 3hrs I think. Paint was holding up well when I sold the boat in 08. I have some Imron left over, but its firethorn metalic! LOL. If I see it a problem, I'll have Kyle paint it.

  16. #16
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akrstabout View Post
    Not gonna go thru all that work I don't think! If I'd get it bead blasted, I'd leave it like that, atleast it's not shining like a florescent light bulb! Yeah when we painted my boat we had to use an two part acid etch process then primer, lit it kick off but top coat in less than 3hrs I think. Paint was holding up well when I sold the boat in 08. I have some Imron left over, but its firethorn metalic! LOL. If I see it a problem, I'll have Kyle paint it.
    Kyle could blast it for you, it would look much better just blasted stainless.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    893

    Default

    MEK, 99% Isopropyl, higher grade ether, etc., are all good cleaning agents, but you'll want to oil -immediately- after with the lube of your choosing/preference...

    And no smoking or flame/spark sources -anywhere- near the 'cleaning area.' Ether, even in liquid form, boils at ~95 degrees fahrenheit, and explodes shortly thereafter as the temperatures climb; not really stable stuff in the heat in that regard, let alone around/near flames.

    ALL of the items I listed above are items you don't want near any flame or heat sources in your home, to include boilers, quartz ignitions on a cook stove or other device, exposed pilot lights, etc. The down-side of all of these excellent would-be cleaning/carrier agents is that they go 'KABOOM' really, really easily... And I found years ago that even breathing near them in some cases where their fumes are prevalent can carry bacteria more effectively into your lungs (my subjective analysis); wear a respirator when dealing with any of the three in volumes large enough to be a primary presence in your respiratory system... Esp. MEK. Your body doesn't like these vapors AT ALL.

  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ruffle View Post
    MEK, 99% Isopropyl, higher grade ether, etc., are all good cleaning agents, but you'll want to oil -immediately- after with the lube of your choosing/preference...

    And no smoking or flame/spark sources -anywhere- near the 'cleaning area.' Ether, even in liquid form, boils at ~95 degrees fahrenheit, and explodes shortly thereafter as the temperatures climb; not really stable stuff in the heat in that regard, let alone around/near flames.

    ALL of the items I listed above are items you don't want near any flame or heat sources in your home, to include boilers, quartz ignitions on a cook stove or other device, exposed pilot lights, etc. The down-side of all of these excellent would-be cleaning/carrier agents is that they go 'KABOOM' really, really easily... And I found years ago that even breathing near them in some cases where their fumes are prevalent can carry bacteria more effectively into your lungs (my subjective analysis); wear a respirator when dealing with any of the three in volumes large enough to be a primary presence in your respiratory system... Esp. MEK. Your body doesn't like these vapors AT ALL.

    ???????????????????????????

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    welfare state of Alaska
    Posts
    5,153

    Default

    You still have the flammability issues but pure ethanol is the least toxic of the common solvents.

    I used to use MTBE when I had access to it; it was great for cleaning plastic with softening or dissolving the surface. Don't know where you could get the stuff now.

    And you can always degrease the metal parts like we do in hot bluing preperation- boil them in a lye or sodium hydroxide solution.

    Quote Originally Posted by ruffle View Post
    MEK, 99% Isopropyl, higher grade ether, etc., are all good cleaning agents, but you'll want to oil -immediately- after with the lube of your choosing/preference...

    And no smoking or flame/spark sources -anywhere- near the 'cleaning area.' Ether, even in liquid form, boils at ~95 degrees fahrenheit, and explodes shortly thereafter as the temperatures climb; not really stable stuff in the heat in that regard, let alone around/near flames.

    ALL of the items I listed above are items you don't want near any flame or heat sources in your home, to include boilers, quartz ignitions on a cook stove or other device, exposed pilot lights, etc. The down-side of all of these excellent would-be cleaning/carrier agents is that they go 'KABOOM' really, really easily... And I found years ago that even breathing near them in some cases where their fumes are prevalent can carry bacteria more effectively into your lungs (my subjective analysis); wear a respirator when dealing with any of the three in volumes large enough to be a primary presence in your respiratory system... Esp. MEK. Your body doesn't like these vapors AT ALL.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  20. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post
    You still have the flammability issues but pure ethanol is the least toxic of the common solvents.
    SURE ! So now you want him to use his last bottle of Everclear to clean a rifle; He's saveing that for a special visitor! Use the starting fluid and drink the ethanol, just don't drink methanol.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •