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Thread: Heading up in the summer

  1. #1
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    Default Heading up in the summer

    Hello all, this is my first post on here. Ive been doing a lot of reading on here lately. Great forum, and thanks to all those who take the time to reply to posts. I currently live in The Peoples Republic of California and I'm planning on escaping this Communist state in the summer and heading up to Alaska. I'm originally from Louisiana, brought to Ca. by way of the USMC (0351). After getting out I decided on moving to an urban area (Los Angeles). I hate it with a passion, and that's even being by the beach. I'm looking to come up this summer and get a job on a boat for the salmon season. I don't get out of school until June 11th, but plan on leaving right after. I was hoping to head somewhere on the Kenai Penn. Is mid to late June too late to get a job on a boat? If so, are processor/ cannery jobs easily obtained, and who are some reputable ones in that area? The plan is to do the summer up there, and if I love it like I think I will, I'm going to stay. Once again, I've been doing my research and I understand that it's not all glorious. Like I said I'm currently attending school, so I may end up going to UA. Any information wold be greatly appreciated. Thanks

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I think most canning/processing jobs are now worked by people from what I guess the politically correct term is developing countries. They get "students" from former East Bloc countries a student visa, have them come over and pay them as little as possible to work as hard as possible. As far as getting a job on a boat, many boats are run as family opperations or jobs come via recomendations or being friends of somebody. Not saying you can't find a job in the fishing industry, but don't be suprised if you come up and can't find work in fishing.

    The best advice is to just come up, travel around and enjoy the state for the summer. Work has a way of taking care of itself in due time but having a whole summer off to enjoy the state is something few of us have the opportunity to do. If you get a cannery job you'll just be working long hard hours and won't be seeing the state.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Hey Paul, thanks for the response. Yea, the main goal is to get up there and experience the state. I contacted the American Legion up that way today, who said they may be able to set me up with a captain once I get up there. That being said, I am not opposed to working in any other industry either. I have a buddy from Ak, says he knows some guys in construction in Soldatna/ Sweard area. So I'm pretty much open to anything.

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    Another good summer job is to fight wildfires. You can get started by working for the State of Alaska as EFF (Emergency Fire Fighter) if you are planning on living in the Soldotna area. You will be required to attend some training which is provided free of charge and then you can either work on initial attack (IA) out of your local State of Alaska Forestry office or go out on Type 2 Crew deployments around the state or down in the lower-48.

    Shoot me a PM if you have any questions.

  5. #5

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    Take a look at Sewardresort.com. Employment Opportunities.. It is a Military MWR facility offering rooms, charters and whatnot.. Students are very welcome for summer jobs, which include deck hands.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    You could probably get on at Trident seafood in Wrangell and maybe on a boat. Semper Fi 8652
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Awesome! thanks for all the responses everyone.

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    Where I went to college it was a small town with a huge student population. Being a student and being able to find anything other than minimum wage work was impossible. I had a batch of business cards made with my name, phone number and the word Handyman emblazoned on the front. On the cards back I listed different jobs:
    Trash hauling,
    Auto repair,
    Appliance repair,
    Painting,
    Plumbing,
    Yard work,
    Carpentry (wood butcher),
    and more!
    I left small piles of these cards in the various hardware stores in town as well as on community bulletin boards. Within a few days I had work, for many times the minimum wage, and a grateful client to boot. With a few weeks I had more work than I could handle, much of it from town slum-lords who provided student housing. If Id never done a certain type of job before Id schedule work for the next day and that night Id go to the library and study a few how-to books (nowadays you could just use google).
    My point is, if youre smart, handy and willing to work theres always work to be found out there.
    Steve
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    Approach life like you do a yellow light - RUN IT! (Gail T.)

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Just to add to that, anyone with a work ethic and the ability to show up on time and sober will never lack for work in Alaska once they've made some contacts.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockdoc View Post
    Where I went to college it was a small town with a huge student population. Being a student and being able to find anything other than minimum wage work was impossible. I had a batch of business cards made with my name, phone number and the word Handyman emblazoned on the front. On the cards back I listed different jobs:
    Trash hauling,
    Auto repair,
    Appliance repair,
    Painting,
    Plumbing,
    Yard work,
    Carpentry (wood butcher),
    and more!
    I left small piles of these cards in the various hardware stores in town as well as on community bulletin boards. Within a few days I had work, for many times the minimum wage, and a grateful client to boot. With a few weeks I had more work than I could handle, much of it from town slum-lords who provided student housing. If Id never done a certain type of job before Id schedule work for the next day and that night Id go to the library and study a few how-to books (nowadays you could just use google).
    My point is, if youre smart, handy and willing to work theres always work to be found out there.
    Steve
    What a great Idea! I think I'll get on Vistaprint now!
    If we all agreed....this would be no fun

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    Default Summer work

    June is a little late in the season to start for many of the seasonal employers, but you'll still find something. There is some turnover about that time for the folks that decide their summer job isn't what they thought it would be. To save money, try to find a place that provides housing and food such as a lodge, tour boat operation, mining camp, and so forth. Take a look at www.alaskatourjobs.com and see what this company has available. Sounds like you are interested in attending UA. Check out the University of Alaska Anchorage campus.

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    Thanks for the advice on the cards. I'll definitely be making some before I head up. As for as campuses I'm not too certain that I want to head to Anchorage. From what it sounds like, I don't think I'll really like there. I want to get away from urban life. I'll be looking to take some classes at one of the satellite campuses then probably Fairbanks. Any experience with that campus?

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    UAF isn't a sattelite campus, in fact I'd say it's probably the better of the two schools, but it depends on what you want to study.

    That said urban life in Anchorage is nothing like urban life in California. You're a 0-30 minute drive from hiking, camping, skiing, rock climbing, ice climbing, fishing and there is wildlife in town. Here are a few photos that are either in town or a short drive away.







    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  14. #14
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I know it's popular to bash Anchorage but unless you want to focus on one paticular activity in your backyard, you cannot beat Anchorage as a hub to explore and enjoy the great state.







    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by captainredshirt View Post
    Thanks for the advice on the cards. I'll definitely be making some before I head up. As for as campuses I'm not too certain that I want to head to Anchorage. From what it sounds like, I don't think I'll really like there. I want to get away from urban life. I'll be looking to take some classes at one of the satellite campuses then probably Fairbanks. Any experience with that campus?
    I got my engineering degree from UAF back in 2002 ('97-'02). I really like the school and felt like the professors did a very good job. I had no problem finding a full time job before I even graduated. Having said that, it has been over 10 years since I have been there, so I don't know what has changed and whether those changes were for the better or not. I know they have done a good amount of physical remodeling on the campus, but not sure beyond that. I really liked the professors I had while up there. I got on a first-name basis with most of them after the first couple years. It wasn't uncommon to walk through the Engineering building and get caught up in a 45 minute discussion about hunting or skiing with one of them.

    When I was choosing a school, and after I had decided that I was going to stay in state (born and raised in Alaska), I was mostly choosing between Anchorage and Fairbanks. There were a number of reasons I went with Fairbanks. At that time, UAA only had a Civil Engineering degree available while UAF had a much wider range of options. I wanted civil from the start, but was not so convinced right away that I thought it would be good to go somewhere that had more options if I chose to switch majors to something else along the way (maybe mechanical or petroleum, etc...). I also felt that with more available majors, there were likely going to be a better range of elective courses available. Another of the big deciding factors was the availability of classes I wanted. At the time, there were more full time students at UAF than UAA. Although the average age of students may have been higher at UAF, most of them were going to school full time and thus would be on a similar schedule as you. UAA had a higher percentage of people taking one or two classes at a time while working full time. I had heard a number of people I knew having problems getting the courses they needed when they needed them (prerequisites and such) because those courses were already full with the part-time students who really could take them whenever. A bit annoying if you have to extend your schooling an extra semester or two because John Doe on the 10-year plan decided he wanted the Mechanics of Materials class you need before you can take the next class.... I don't know if this is still an issue or not.

    I stayed on campus for the 4.5 years I was up there, from the dorms to the Student Appartment Complex (SAC). I was able to ride my bike to pretty much all my classes year-round, so a car was not necessary. Anchorage would be a bit harder I think since the campus is a bit more spread out and other things you might need (food, shopping) are a bit further away.

    The topping on the cake for me was that it put me far enough away from home that my parents were not going to drop in all the time to bug me, but close enough that I could drive down for a weekend to visit if I wanted to.

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    A great thing about the interior is that you never find yourself making excuses for living here .

    But double-ditto on the need for flexibility. To be honest I don't think people who come here to get away from where they are tend to do real well here. And if you're trying to get away from hippies, wow are you in for a rude awakening.
    Mushing Tech: squeezing the romance out of dog mushing one post at a time

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Getting your pre-requisites is still a problem at UAA. Several of my daughters friends started UAA this fall and they are having problems getting their pre-req's.

    I've worked with several engineers from UAF, all of them seem to have gotten a top notch education. We've spent some time at UAF when our kids had some summer activities and it's a nice campus and a nice town. UAF feels like a real college campus, UAA not so much.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Thanks for the heads up about Anchorage. Guess I was just going off of all the bashing of it I've seen on here.

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  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    I know it's popular to bash Anchorage but unless you want to focus on one paticular activity in your backyard, you cannot beat Anchorage as a hub to explore and enjoy the great state.
    Great pictures Paul! Thanks for sharing!

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